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OJDLA Journals & News



Welcome to the University of West Georgia Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration news feed. Here you can find a variety of articles and news pertaining to the OJDLA.



Published: Thursday, June 15th, 2017 5:00:00 -0500

 



Welcome!!! New edition of the OJDLA Journal - Summer 2017 - Volume 20 Issue 2

Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00:00 -0500

Here is our new edition of the OJDLA Journal - Summer 2017 - Volume 20 Issue 2(Double click on the article titles to see the entire article).

Here is a letter from our editor:


Greetings, Next week is my favorite week of the year, our annual Distance Learning Administration Conference in Jekyll Island, Georgia. This year is very special to me as we welcome back our first keynote speaker from 2000 - Dr. Barbara Truman of the University of Central Florida. Looking back on that first year (seventeen years ago) makes me realize how much has changed. In that summer, my middle child was a newborn. Now, he is a rising senior taking an online class as a dual-enrolled student at the University of West Georgia. By the time he graduates and enters college, he will nearly be a sophomore. Truly, the opportunities that all of our collective work in online learning has produced over the past two decades are something of which we can all be truly amazed and proud. At the same time, I also see too many new barriers being put into place, whether driven by regulatory or political interests, or misguided perceptions of the threat of online learning. As quality continues to improve and online learning becomes a larger part of the fabric of higher education, I believe we as administrators must be proactive in our big-picture thinking, rather than waiting until we are forced to react. I look forward to these and more conversations on the beautiful Georgia coast next week. Happy Summer! - Melanie Melanie N. Clay, Ph.D. Thursday, June 15, 2017



A Comparative Typology of Student and Institutional Expectations of Online Faculty

Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00:00 -0500

Summer 2017 - Volume 20 Issue 2

by Melanie E. Shaw , Meena C. Clowes , Scott W. M. Burrus

Online faculty must uphold institutional expectations for their performance. Typically, online institutions have specific guidelines for faculty-to-student interactions; yet, student expectations of faculty may not necessarily align with institutional requirements. This study included a typological analysis of institutional requirements for online faculty in terms of student engagement. Then, student comments regarding faculty performance expectations were compared. Based on the findings, there are substantive differences which should be considered by institutions to ensure online student satisfaction with faculty is maximized. Recommendations for further study include replicating this with a purposeful sample of online students and doing a quantitative study of the relationship between faculty outcomes after implementing student performance expectations.



A Concierge Model for Supporting Faculty in Online Course Design

Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00:00 -0500

Summer 2017 - Volume 20 Issue 2

by David S. McCurry and Bonnie B. Mullinix

Individualized approaches to online course design benefit faculty in numerous ways. Using a “concierge” model approach, this paper describes the working principles and steps used in course development. The general approach directly addresses many inherent problems with instructional design processes, which often highlight discrepancies in preparation and background between instructional designers and faculty as “subject matter” specialists. The concierge model outlined re-centers the course development process around the unique qualities of individual faculty, their academic and professional knowledge of the course “content”, and the body of skills and knowledge introduced by a partner instructional designer. All members of this partnership stand to gain in positive ways, as faculty can share their passion and depth of knowledge “translating” traditional course material to online teaching formats with the supportive skills and insights of the partner course designer. To guide this interaction, the paper provides “10 Concierge Keys of Supporting Individualized Online Course Development”. Together these offer a manifesto to guide academic instructional design support staff and units responsible for course development.



Distance Learning: A Game Changer

Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00:00 -0500

Summer 2017 - Volume 20 Issue 2

by Rodger Bates and Bryan LaBrecque

Previous research identified a variety of special populations which may be serviced through online learning activities. These have included the military, Native Americans, prisoners, remote occupations, and others. This paper focuses the growing role of distance learning opportunities for student and professional athletes. Special attention is directed at the rules and regulations at the high school and college levels as well as the various types of programs and resources that have been developed for this population. Also, the development of online degree completion and graduate degrees for professional athletes are explored.  



Full-Time and Adjunct Faculty Priorities for Online Instructional Behavior

Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00:00 -0500

Summer 2017 - Volume 20 Issue 2

by Chad Maxson

This study explored priorities for online instructional behavior in post-traditional programs at Private Christian University (PCU). No prior study had been identified that compared the online instructional priorities among full-time faculty (n = 73) and online adjunct faculty (n = 69). This study would benefit those who oversee online instructional standards or who operate online adjunct faculty development programs. Quantitative research was conducted using a survey instrument to answer the three research questions. A t-test for independent means was used to analyze how full-time and adjunct faculty members prioritized 29 online instructional behaviors. The results indicated statistically significant differences on two items. An implication of the study is that, based on the lead indicator of instructional priorities, adjunct faculty members may provide as high or higher quality online instruction than do full-time faculty members.



Age Difference in Research Course Satisfaction in a Blended Ed.D. Program: A Moderated Mediation Model of the Effects of Internet Self-Efficacy and Statistics Anxiety

Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00:00 -0500

Summer 2017 - Volume 20 Issue 2

by Lu Liu and MD Haque

This study identified the moderated mediation relationship among age, Internet self-efficacy, and statistics anxiety on student satisfaction after controlling for demographics and technology experiences in research methods courses in a blended professional doctoral program. One hundred and thirty-one students in a three-year Ed.D. Program participated in the study. The results show that after controlling for gender, ethnicity, and technology experiences, age was negatively associated with Internet self-efficacy and Internet self-efficacy mediated the relationship between age and course satisfaction as well. Although the moderation effect of statistics anxiety between self-efficacy and student satisfaction was not supported, there was still partial evidence that the group with statistics anxiety behaved differently from the group without statistics anxiety in terms of the conditional indirect effect of age on course satisfaction. The authors call for future studies to focus on online or blended research courses in professional doctoral programs and test the proposed conceptual model.



Facilitating Professional Learning Communities Among Higher Education Faculty: The Walden Junto Model

Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00:00 -0500

Summer 2017 - Volume 20 Issue 2

by Laurie A. Bedford and Katie A. Rossow

Virtual Professional Learning Communities (PLC) have become an innovative way to meet the professional development needs of faculty in the online learning environment. Walden University’s model for PLCs, the Walden Junto, uses a combination of synchronous and asynchronous online strategies and is based on a philosophy that embraces the faculty members’ needs for professional growth as well as building community among the faculty population. However, previous research into virtual PLCs has examined either exclusively synchronous or asynchronous settings and has primarily focused on the processes of the community rather than outcomes.  The intent of this research was to determine the impact of participation in the Walden Junto on faculty perception of collegial relationships and on classroom performance.  An exploratory survey design was employed to answer these research questions. The survey was administered to volunteers from the population of faculty who participated in a Walden Junto within a one-year time frame. Descriptive statistics and chi square analysis were used to examine the data.  Findings suggest that a PLC model such as the Walden Junto can be a means to reinforce participants’ needs for belonging through collaboration and sharing of resources. In addition, it may be an appropriate professional development activity to create knowledge transfer to practice in some faculty roles.