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Preview: Don W Strickland: RadioFAQ

Don W Strickland: RadioFAQ



tips, wishes, faqs see also my Radio notes how to submit or receive dws.RadioFAQs



Last Build Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 22:11:32 GMT

Copyright: Copyright 2004 Don W Strickland
 




Mon, 09 Feb 2004 21:52:00 GMT

Kicking Radio
Periodically I get email from new Salon bloggers who've downloaded Radio Userland and tried to post to their new blog, only to find themselves thoroughly confused by Radio's innovative but initially hard-to-fathom "desktop webserver" approach.

Recently, rather than try to fumblingly explain what's really going on myself, I've just been pointing people to this chapter of Rogers Cadenhead's book "Radio UserLand Kick Start," which explains how to start a Radio blog.

There's more about the whole book here. By putting that chapter online Rogers has performed a great public service (since the documentation from UserLand is not as extensive as it could be). Thanks!

In an amusing side note, Cadenhead, who also has long maintained the "alterna-Drudge" site Drudge Retort at the "drudge.com" domain name, reports that his server was brought to its knees Monday by crazed Web surfers desperately turning to Drudge for their fix of Janet Jackson's breast-flesh. [Scott Rosenberg's Links & Comment]





Thu, 10 Apr 2003 03:57:26 GMT

[RadioFAQs]
Question: Why does my Radio (8.0.8 on 10.2.4) crash when the aggregator runs ? If I set the aggregator to run at startup Radio will launch, initialize, then crash. If I set it to not run at startup Radio runs fine until the aggregator starts and then it crashes. ... sigh ... I want my news! I've tried 8.0.9b2 ... didn't help. Answer: Ah ha! The answer is in one of my subscriptions ... now to figure out which one. When I trim my list down to 5 subs it works fine. Wouldn't it be nice if I could examine a log to see which subscription is the last one to work and what the next subscription to be read is. Hours later ... I got impatient and deleted all but my favorite four feeds. That fixed the problem so I started slowly adding the other 44 feeds back. I found one that pointed to a page that didn't exist anymore. I don't know if that's the real reason, but now my NEWS is flowing again. :-)




Fri, 14 Mar 2003 05:17:40 GMT

Radio tip: Getting tools to use the default template. I've just been working on a Radio tool, and one thing that's been bugging me is that it has been refusing to use the default template.

When you create a new tool and give it a page of its own (http://127.0.0.1/5335/myNewToolName), the template you get is really plain - just enough HTML to get your page to validate (maybe ;).

Deleting the #template node in the myNewToolNameWebsite table in your database and refreshing the page in a browser, the template changes to a very very old template (like the one on this page).

Just found the solution (in this message from 2002): you need to reinstall the tool to get it to pick up the changes. Selecting the .root window for the new tool, then Tools | Developers | Re-install Front Tool... will do this. And now you have a tool that fits in nicely with the rest of the desktop website!

Comment

[Second p0st]




Mon, 06 Jan 2003 17:38:13 GMT

Dave Winer, job seeker..

Dave Winer, software pioneer and entrepreneur, is on the market.

Believe it or not I'm applying for a job in academia, so it's time to put together my curriculum vitae. It's a fancy name for a resume. Basically, the job I want to do is the one I have been doing, with some extras (like teaching), but not in the context of a commercial software company. more...

I think Dave is following his heart. He may have had his fill for now of the daily small business owner grind. And UserLand may be poised for new management and new directions. We'll stay tuned.

p.s. Now is the time for Dave to make weblogs more useful in job search.

Start by acknowledging that CVs are made from microcontent. Then...

  1. Support HR-XML "Resume" protocol, syndicate CVs via RSS.
  2. Create a blogging user and programmatic interface for creating and maintaining a CV.
  3. Make it easy to associate posts with specific jobs, projects, and skills.
  4. Make job availability clearly visible.

Blogging tools should turbocharge your career search. 

 [a klog apart's Bloggers for Hire]

[Phil Wolff: bloggers for hire]




Mon, 16 Dec 2002 06:39:21 GMT

New beta releases of Frontier and Radio. Jake Savin: New beta releases of both Frontier and Radio UserLand for Mac OS X are now available. These releases fix a crashing bug introduced with Apple's release of Mac OS X 10.2.2, and also include bug fixes and performance improvements for the DLL interface, thanks to Andre Radke.
[Jake's Radio 'Blog] [Jeff's Radio Weblog]




Mon, 16 Dec 2002 06:39:13 GMT

Radio Userland has been upgraded to support Really Simple Discovery (RSD), an XML-based protocol that enables weblog editing tools to easily find the Web services they can use to read and write a weblog.

This ought to provide a nice boost to weblog editing clients -- especially if they are designed for non-technical users. A prospective weblogger would only need to know three things to get started: his or her username, password, and weblog address.

This can get even simpler on Radio-style weblog servers. The Radio Community Server and Python Community Server will issue a new weblog address to any XML-RPC client that provides a username that isn't already taken and a password for that account (assuming the server is still allowing new accounts). [Workbench]





Mon, 16 Dec 2002 06:34:48 GMT

Radio Userland has been upgraded to support Really Simple Discovery (RSD), an XML-based protocol that enables weblog editing tools to easily find the Web services they can use to read and write a weblog.

This ought to provide a nice boost to weblog editing clients -- especially if they are designed for non-technical users. A prospective weblogger would only need to know three things to get started: his or her username, password, and weblog address.

This can get even simpler on Radio-style weblog servers. The Radio Community Server and Python Community Server will issue a new weblog address to any XML-RPC client that provides a username that isn't already taken and a password for that account (assuming the server is still allowing new accounts). [Rogers Cadenhead: Workbench: Radio Userland Tips]





Thu, 05 Dec 2002 05:07:54 GMT

Phillip Pearson runs down the early history of Radio Userland using cached UserLand pages from the Internet Archive, answering a question that's probably on the mind of many current users: Why the name Radio?

I was a heavy user of Radio Userland's original MP3 queueing and playback features, broadcasting a Live365 station and using it to randomly cycle through my CDs. I may be digging out Music.root again to turn my copy of RU into a radio station -- I bought a U.S. Robotics SoundLink at a doorbuster sale last Friday in Dallas and can use it to wirelessly broadcast music from a PC to a stereo system. [Rogers Cadenhead: Workbench: Radio Userland Tips]





Thu, 05 Dec 2002 04:50:47 GMT

Radio Wishlist - Print to Blog..

We had print-to-fax a long time ago. Why not Print-to-Blog? Weblog as printer driver!

Make it so I can post from almost any app.

Most apps have a document object model on the sending end. I think there are components that render to html. We have the programming hooks on the receiving end. What's left? 

[a klog apart Blue Sky Radio]

[Phil Wolff: Blue Sky Radio]




Thu, 05 Dec 2002 04:50:35 GMT

Radio Wishlist - More firewall support..

Dave Winer reports a new "Radio" feature: Proxy Exceptions. This opens up intranet ftp sites and RSS feeds when I tell Radio to ignore my org's proxy service for servers on an exception list

Excellent for klogging!

Now I want more:

  1. Let me share/publish my exceptions list. Perhaps as an opml file? An RSS file?
  2. Let me subscribe to one or more exceptions lists.
  3. Let me publish an aggregated exception list combined from my own entries and my subscriptions.
  4. Autodetect urls that don't have a known top level domain (.com, .uk, etc.). Perhaps confirm with the user that it isn't a typo. Ask if I want to add this server to my exceptions list.
  5. Validate that exceptions can still be reached and found.

[aka Blue Sky Radio]

[a klog apart]




Fri, 22 Nov 2002 06:10:37 GMT

Blogging Resource Directory found thanks to links on http://randomfoo.net/ which I found on my referers.  Another place to explore links. [Al Macintyre: e Radio Ideas]




Fri, 22 Nov 2002 06:05:36 GMT

Radio Wishlist - Print to Blog..

We had print-to-fax a long time ago. Why not Print-to-Blog? Weblog as printer driver!

Make it so I can post from almost any app.

Most apps have a document object model on the sending end. I think there are components that render to html. We have the programming hooks on the receiving end. What's left? 

[a klog apart Blue Sky Radio]

[a klog apart]




Fri, 22 Nov 2002 04:23:10 GMT

Radio Wish: When we have something from News Aggregation, that we Post + Publish as is or edited or with some of our remarks upon on our site, the act of publishing it the first time causes a ping on the referers of where ever we got the data from.  Perhaps if we revise the story, and republish, there goes another ping.  This would automate notification of who is using our stuff, to help expedite our interaction with each other.  Perhaps it could be in Preferences whether or not we want this happening. [Al Macintyre: e Radio Ideas]




Fri, 22 Nov 2002 04:23:02 GMT

Radio Referer Wish:  I have previously stated a desire to get at something more than 24 hours ago, and sometimes think more about what kind of form I want it in, so that I can aggregate it into some kind of personal data base.

  • Search engine hits ... what host sites are they using ... what text strings are they using ... give me the option of ignoring all the search engine hits and just list the real people
  • Other webloggers - point me to WHERE on that web site the link to me came from, and to which of my pages it got directed.

Well my latest thought on this topic is that perhaps we could have additional columns on the chart.

  • Date time of 1st connecton hit out there
  • Date time of last connection hit
  • The above two datums could then tie into preferences of how far back we want our referers to be stored ... for example ... I might normally want to allow for me not looking at the data for 72 hours, then after I got my fill - push a button to get rid of everything that is over 24 hours old.
  • I would like little boxes beside them ... kill all these search engine and spammer links from My personal referer review
  • The mass public sites would still show the same kind of data we now have, but when I am looking at my referers, I am more interested in who is quoting me, and other people interests that are following the threads of those quotes and discussion.  Perhaps there are some other tools that I ought to be using to get a handle on this.
  • I would like something at the very top of the referer list ... when by some miracle I have made it into the top 100 Ranking for the day ... let me know that factoid, so I only know to go look when in fact I am there
[Al Macintyre: e Radio Ideas]




Fri, 22 Nov 2002 04:22:52 GMT

Expanding on my previous post inspired by Phil Wolff on mapping the Blogsphere, we can discuss what we think might do the job effectively, then state a series of wishes for additional standards that apply to more than one vendor for this to work, assuming they are sufficiently motivated for it to happen.  Here is link to other people comments on Phil Wolff idea. There are a lot of sites that don't show up on the radar screens of search engines or weblog directories.  Newbies who might delay self-registration until they get more self-confidence.  Weblogs inside the intranet firewall of a business, school system, or government agency.  People on project teams can have private multi-author sites known only to each other and need password to access the content. Some Blog Software is free unregistered until get paid services, or lacks the high environment options of the leaders.  Pirates want a low profile.  Do we want to count all of this in our blogsphere map? Some Blog Software outfits claim 750,000 customers or some such number, and we know many not registered with weblog.com.  Many can be inactive for a broad spectrum of reasons ranging from newbie got suck or hyper active ran out of disk space and continued on next installment space.  Would some Blog Software places accept an outside audit of where they get their customer count, and who would pay for such an audit? From this we can hopefully get ratios of total customer volume vs. weblog.com radar that are reliable proportions across consistent Blog Software Types (on line, off line, publish, community, etc.).  I call this the radar ratio ... how much is out there as opposed to how much is actually on the radar screens.  I think that journalists and researchers would be highly motivated to get a handle on what that is, and might be where the funding come from for my proposed audit. Some Blog Software is more appropriate for educators, journalists, intranets, and other non-hostile labels of WHAT AM I motivation for weblog.  On/off global radar screen probably vaies by types of such communities. There must be at least 50 different directories of weblogs, and counting.  There needs to be a registration service where it is easier for the beginner to fill in all the info about self, that the various services desire, and say to send this to ALL the directories, or NONE of them, or SPECIFIC ones.  I am thinking of a page connected to the Prefs, in which there would be links to each of the directories basic info, so the blogger could say YES register me with THIS one also.  An important part of this is WHAT AM I in terms of categorizing type of personal interests intended for this blog, which will change over time.  We might need a variant per category. There should be some info pre-calculated here that you cannot change ... WHAT AM I in terms of what Blog Software. I have seen posts saying this or that content focus is not a real weblogger, and the phraseology is invariably somewhat hostile.  We need to come up with non-hostile labels and definitions linked to the self-registration page such that a person who really is that type of user vision for blog usage can say YES that is what I want to be or accomplish, and check off a particular self-assessment, or NO none of these match my self-image goals, so they optionally key in text describing personal blog goals. Different directories for different purposes do want different info, and quite probably someone filling out their page will not have enough info to get properly registered at one or more Link Service direct[...]




Fri, 22 Nov 2002 04:22:38 GMT

PC Question: How do I get rid of this new hassle?  Every time I arrive at the News Aggregation page <http://127.0.0.1:5335/system/pages/news#250> up pops Security Warning (mislabeled advertisement) Do you want to install and run Macromedia Flash Player 6, a quick free download?  I select NO, then the next time I arrive at the News Aggregation page, there it is again.  This started this week, since I got the same thing when visiting one of the sites found in my referers.  I am not interested in downloading any more load onto my PC until it is obvious to me why I need this or that.  I have a clog problem as it is, without adding more baggage. [Al Macintyre: e Radio Ideas]




Fri, 22 Nov 2002 03:43:44 GMT

[Don W Strickland: RadioFAQ] Quotes [Phil Wolff: Blue Sky Radio] asking a question to which I think I can add some answers, starting with the notion that this is worth an occasional review and I agree that there are several tools that can be added to our collection to improve the picture.  Take a look at past stories and posts that I have done of relevance. Sep 30 I did a post listing some Search Engine and Link Service directories of weblogs with how many known to each ... How do they find these places?  Is it purely user registration and www.weblogger.com?  Weblog Compendium lists 35 directories of Weblogs  Look at Sebastien Paquet's Weblogs by Profession - How do Seb and friends locate sites to be listed?  Can we do a SWAG (Scientific Wild Ass Guestimate) what proportion of such sites actually get found to be listed like this?  Will this vary by profession?  Can we help locate additional sites that should be added?  Do weblogs appeal particularly to particular professions?  Can we estimate what percentage of the people in a profession are likely to be turned on to this hobby? Link Services and Search Engine Tips include a score of places that try to keep score on what's going on in blogspace, for those bloggers who register with them.  Perhaps we need some centralized service for all this, that is similar to www.weblogger.com but we also need something to count the secret sites that do not register with weblogger.  Review my Sep 9 post about www.alexa.com because perhaps we need Link Services based on improvements to existing ones.   Do places like www.blogrolling.com have statistics on how many people are using their services? I have found over 100 suppliers of Blog Software but only begun to categorize Blog Software Types.  I suspect our hypothetical census will want to know how many of each combination type are out there.  As I came across claims of how many this or that Blog Software out there, I added that to my Blog Software story.  Also see my Sep 11 link to key info on the Wired article claiming 1/2 million weblogs on the Internet, with analysis of patterns of webloggers giving up on one kind of Blog Software and starting over with another. I might also add some questions to the survey. Proportionally how many posts are never quoted by other people, how many get quoted / copied at least once, how many get multiple copied?  Of those bloggers doing quoting / copying, what proportion of copies are done with proper credit, just copied without comment, commented on by the person copying the material? Which weblog software providers claim to have some number of customers, and are they willing to open that portion of their books to some kind of outside audit to validate those claims? Can ISPs or Search Engines tell whether a web site is a weblog, or something else?  Can information from ISPs and Search Engines be combined to count how much volume is on various domains that is what kind of web site? [Don W Strickland: RadioFAQ] from [Phil Wolff: Blue Sky Radio] QUOTE We need a census of blogspace.. A friend of mine asked: how many webloggers are there? This is like "How big is the Internet?" I searched through Nua and a dozen other internet sites and haven't seen any research on the size of the blogosphere. I ask you: Do you have an educated guess? Do you know of any prior work in this area? Can you think of a methodology or two to create useful measures of the number of bloggers and the number of weblogs? What related questions would you w[...]




Fri, 22 Nov 2002 03:43:28 GMT

Weblogger Hosting Tip: If you running out of disk space for your weblog, you might check out this possibility.  One of my Southern Indiana neighbors in the world of personal web pages is www.greeblie.com (the other one that I have found so far is http://www.countermoon.com/) who is considering offering free hosting for a limited number of experienced journal-type bloggers (Dave not looking for pundits and lookie-heres).  I am now at 70% of my 40 meg and falling, and there is a lot of stuff I am not posting because I know it will accelerate my fall, but my interests are all over the map. [Al Macintyre: e Radio Ideas]




Mon, 18 Nov 2002 03:57:33 GMT

We need a census of blogspace.. A friend of mine asked: how many webloggers are there? This is like "How big is the Internet?" I searched through Nua and a dozen other internet sites and haven't seen any research on the size of the blogosphere. I ask you: Do you have an educated guess? Do you know of any prior work in this area? Can you think of a methodology or two to create useful measures of the number of bloggers and the number of weblogs? What related questions would you want answered? How might you use this information? Pitfalls to avoid? Would you join a BlogCensus.org to provide and share stats? My wild stabs: Do you have an educated guess? Not yet. Do you know of any prior work in this area? No. I've looked. Can you think of a methodology or two to create useful measures of the number of bloggers and the number of weblogs? Some vendors host weblogs and have relevant stats. We could add those up. We could look at download and registrations from the top 5 vendors, and add fudge factors to cover other tools and disadoption rates What related questions would you want answered? LiveJournal.com, has a statistics page: (numbers as of 10 November 2002) Total users: 770910 Users that have ever updated: 635168 Users updating in last 30 days: 280213 Users updating in last 7 days: 200543 Users updating in past 24 hours: 72587 Gender: Male: 201452 (36.3%) Female: 354085 (63.7%) Unspecified: 131153 Account Type Free Account: 718109 (93.2%) Early Adopter: 14282 (1.9%) Paid Account: 36718 (4.8%) Permanent Account: 1218 (0.2%) Country of origin (Mostly English-speaking) US state of origin (California, New York, Florida, Michigan lead) Age distribution (mode=17) Client usage (90% web) Activity: posts by day overall (147k posts last Wednesday) Per-person would be interesting too. New accounts per day (eyeballing a chart it looks like 900-1400 new LJ users per day, averaging about 1100) I'd love to know: How many entries have ever been blogged? (the cumulative number of posts). How many links in posts? (excluding blogrolls and navigation) What blogging tool or service they're using? Blog lifecycles: How long to bloggers of various stripes blog? How many change hosts? Change tools? Why do people abandon blogging? Is there a critical mass, a minimum number of posts per day/week/month that separates those that blog from those that fail? Of people who take a break, how many start again? Number originating within a company or operating behind a firewall Connection speed (does broadband make it easier to blog?) Payload distribution. How many people include pictures, sounds, flash games, or movies? How many bytes are home pages? Syndication. What percentage syndicate their sites? Duplication/Overlap: How many blogs per person? Do you post to them equally? How many are updated daily/weekly/monthly? How many tools do you use? What ancillary tools do you use? Graphics and other media News readers HTML editors email clients blog-specific search (daypop, google) blogosphere navigation (blogdex, blogtree) How might you use this information? As a blogger. Always good to know where I stand in relation to the pack. Trends might tip me to new capabilities As a consultant or IT leader. Make better choices about deploying blogging and community tools Use the "bandwagon" sell when appropriate As a blog tool maker. Understand the markets I serve vs. the ones I don't  Pitfalls to avoid? Hype Irreproducible results Bias - vendor, country Would you join an BlogCensus.org to provide and share stats? As a user, with[...]




Mon, 18 Nov 2002 03:48:30 GMT

[RadioFAQs]
Question: Problems with categories' RSS.

I posted this posted this to Radio discussion, but they keep silent:

Something really strange: shortcuts don't work in categories RSS, but html there is fine. Any idea how to correct it?

There is another problem as well: blog title appears as "Lilia Efimova: category name" instead of "Mathemagenic: category name". In both cases HTML is ok.

[Lilia Efimova: Radio]




Wed, 13 Nov 2002 02:55:59 GMT

[RadioFAQs]
Question: For the last couple months, my Radio installation has been brutalized by a truly horrendous memory leak of some sort. I've asked for help with this over at the Radio discussion boards at Userland, but all I've ever heard from the Userland powers-that-be is "email your configuration" and "compact your data files". I never got anything in the way of a useful response to emailing my configuration, and no matter how I compact my data files, uninstall tools, turn on or off upstreaming, etc, even reinstall Radio, I still have massive memory problems. I'm on Windows 2000 Professional, and it seems to jump up a dozen or two Kbytes every 10 seconds or so. Does anyone have any actual suggestions as to how to fix this? I know it's not just me - plenty of people have posted messages about this kind of problem, and gotten the same response I have, or none at all. Is Radio even QA tested on Win2k? In fact, I've heard that the problems are even worse on XP. Please, don't suggest that I should compact my data files, turn off upstreaming, uninstall tools, or any of the things that have already been said five times over. I love Radio, but this makes it so that I can only have Radio running if I'm not trying to do anything else, which is completely unacceptable. [Andrew Bayer: Radio Questions]




Wed, 13 Nov 2002 02:51:20 GMT

This month I have continued to update many of my stories.  Those with the most additions and updates are shown below with links to the respective stories.  The most volume of recent input to my stories categorized here as NEW A B C D. Alternate Realities - This Science Fiction Topic has nothing to do with Radio or Weblogging how-to.  Here I basically try to explain the Games Dimension, with a few movies, and I plan to do books later.   This is NEW in the last few days.   It could well be that this concept is so alien for some people, that it is as difficult to explain to newbies as it is to do documentation for weblogging. Blog Books - still stands at a dozen choices - I have now got my hands on a couple of them, and I have inserted brief overviews of what their contents are all about.  C Blog Money = a few more ideas. D Blog Software directory - I have not added much in the way of new links to software providers, but rather most of my recent additions have been expanding details about what each has to offer that is different, and links to more info. A Blog Software Types - this is a NEW story (2 pages long) started today, supplementing my Blog Software directory, by helping understand the fundamental differences that are out there - off-site / on-line / Radio mixture, and stating major advantages and disadvantages with each kind. BPCS Doc Sources - This has nothing to do with Radio or Weblogging.  BPCS is the ERP at my day job.  Documentation Sources is a recurring hot topic in some discussion groups, so I thought I would create something conceptually similar to Radio Doc Sources, and this is a NEW story (8 pages so far) built up this weekend. Link Services is a story that I started last month, and periodically been adding to, with respect to syndicating your weblog. D Heaven Dimension - This Science Fiction Theology has nothing to do with Radio or Weblogging how-to.  I have been a long time Science Fiction fan of Alternate Realities and I came across a depiction of Religion in a novel that I thought was extremely well done, although to some people this might seem a rather controversial notion.  NEW Radio Doc Sources - directory of links to different people who supply documentation for Radio users ... just a little amount added so far this month.  D Radio Start = a few more links for beginners. D Search Engine Tips - this keeps growing with links to cool things we can get from different sites.  C Understand Radio Categories = additional nuances.  C Understand Radio News Aggregation got a major rewrite expansion (now 6 pages), to clarify some jargon and concepts that had not previously been spelled out in what I thought was a satisfactory manner.  I am now making heavy use of analogies, comparing aspects of this to how TV News shares the headlines. A Understand Radio Referers - periodically I add additional nuances to this big picture. D [Al Macintyre: e Radio Ideas][...]




Wed, 13 Nov 2002 02:51:08 GMT

Radio Weblogs Wish:  I have checked the preferences box to notify www.weblogs.com when my Radio Weblog is updated.  There are various other services that feed off of this, that I talk about in my stories about Link Services, Search Engine Tips, etc.  My updates are often in the area of the individual stories, most of them have to do with some Radio Documentation, or Blog Software in general, but the latest one I working on is a Science Fiction topic.  What seems to show up on www.weblogs.com is the url for my general home page.  It might be nice if it was the url of what changed or updated, unless the story I working on is not quite ready for people to see yet.  So here is my idea for a future variant on the current service.

On the page where we do the Preferences to notify www.weblogs.com there would be a secondary box ... if we are updating stories do we want what is sent to www.weblogs.com to be the url of our home page or the individual stories we just updated?  Then on the page where we have a submit button to input the text to some stories we just added or changed, there would be another check box (only if notifying www.weblogs.com had been activated by us on the regular Preferences) where we would have the option for this particular update to just have our regular home page url be what goes to the folks viewing www.weblogs.com - this way we can have the best of all possible worlds.

Some people may continue to keep their stories hidden from public view until ready to share them, while other people can make it easier for people to see what stories just got updated or added. 

[Al Macintyre: e Radio Ideas]




Sun, 10 Nov 2002 18:45:50 GMT

[RadioFAQs]
Radio Tip: Radio UserLand : Radio's XML-RPC Interface for the Aggregator. "Here's a new feature for Radio UserLand's news aggregator -- an XML-RPC interface that makes it possible to create user interfaces for UserLand's engine in any language or environment: In Flash, .Net, Java, DHTML, Cocoa, Python, Tcl, Perl, you name it. People want every kind of user interface imaginable. We want to leverage our work in aggregation engines across all possible environments." [Cool.] [Archipelago]




Sun, 10 Nov 2002 06:59:56 GMT

Experiences of switching to a new Radio weblog theme. Matt Croydon::postneo answered my question about how easy applying the new theme was: The transition went pretty well.  I had also tweaked my old theme, adding links and blogrolls down the side.  I saved my home page template so that I could keep these tweaks. The next step was to turn upstreaming off in Radio.  I didn't want things to go live until they were ready.  I had to remove every reference of Veranda and Garamond from the movable type CSS file after applying the theme.  I'm an Airal guy.  It's clean. After removing a few things like smaller fonts on links and adding a new section on the sidebar with my blogroll, I turned on upstreaming. I opened Radio, and ran Tools -> Publish -> Entire website.  A good backup of your www folder should be done beforehand. Overall I'm pleased with the result.  It didn't take a whole lot of time and was definately worth it.Thanks for the answer! I think I'll have to look at my style definitions to make the new theme a bit more readable. But this is a good start, I believe. I also used the following hint on Centralized CSS in Radio: If you would like to centralize your Radio CSS you can simple save your Style sheet as "#cascadingStyleSheet.txt" then place it in your "www" folder. Then simply add the body { margin:20px 20px 20px 20px; background:#6C6457; } A { color: #993300; font-family: verdana, arial, sans-serif; text-decoration: none; } A:link { color: #993300; text-decoration: none; } A:visited { color: #993300; text-decoration: none; } A:active { color: #FFCC66; } A:hover { color: #FFCC66; } #banner { font-family:georgia, verdana, arial, sans-serif; color:#FFFFFF; font-size:26px; font-weight:bold; border-left:1px dotted #FFF; border-right:1px dotted #FFF; border-top:1px dotted #FFF; background:#993300; padding:15px; } .description { font-family:verdana, arial, sans-serif; color:#FFFFFF; font-size:12px; font-weight:bold; background:#993300; text-transform:none; letter-spacing: .none; } .radioMenuLinkFont { font-family:verdana, arial, sans-serif; color:#993300; font-size:10px; font-weight:bold; } .radioMenuLink { font-family:verdana, arial, sans-serif; color:#993300; font-size:10px; font-weight:bold; } a.radioMenuLink:link { color: #993300; text-decoration: none } a.radioMenuLink:visited { color: #993300; text-decoration: none } a.radioMenuLink:hover { color: #993300; text-decoration: underline } #content { float:left; position:relative; width:70%; background:#FFFFFF; margin-right:15px; margin-bottom:20px; border:1px dotted #333; } #links { background:#FF9933; padding:15px; border:1px dotted #FFF; } .blog { padding:15px; background:#FFF; } .blogbody { font-family:verdana, arial, sans-serif; color:#666666; font-size:11px; font-weight:normal; background:#FFFFFF; line-height:14px; padding:10px; } .body { font-family:verdana, arial, sans-serif; color:#666666; font-size:11px; font-weight:normal; background:#FFFFFF; line-height:14px; padding:10px; } .title { font-family: verdana, arial; font-size: 15px; color: #003366; text-transform:uppercase; } .footer { font-family:verdana, arial, sans-serif; color:#666; font-size:10px; font-weight:normal; backgr[...]