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Comments on: How Aggregate Displays Change User Behavior



A blog about interface and product design by Joshua Porter



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By: » Allison Stokke, Web aggregation effects and privacy2.0 - Paolo blog: Ramblings on Trust, Reputation, Recommender Systems, Social Software, Free Software, ICT4D and much more

Wed, 29 Aug 2007 10:51:25 +0000

[...] all this attention. This attention is just the product of Web aggregation. There is an interesting paper by Duncan Watts which empirically shows that, while aggregation produces items that got a lot of attention (the [...]



By: Social Design Principles « The KSeeker

Wed, 25 Jul 2007 05:15:17 +0000

[...] Posted by Girish Krishnan on July 25th, 2007 Here are some Insights into Designing a social Network [...]



By: tipos de usuarios según comportamiento « Entreveo

Sat, 21 Jul 2007 15:01:15 +0000

[...] Sólo hay q recordar que los usuarios somos todos y que todos tenemos diferentes comportamientos según los sites a los que lleguemos. Y que si esos comportamientos pueden ser influidos por el diseño ( How aggregate displays change user behaviour ) pues a tenerlo en mente. [...]



By: May’s most-popular links: Social social social social porn porn porn blog blog community : Joe Think » Online News Blog Archive

Wed, 11 Jul 2007 13:51:50 +0000

[...] How Aggregate Displays Change User Behavior: “A fascinating study demonstrates how simply displaying aggregate data like Top 10 lists heavily influences the way people make decisions on social web sites.” [...]



By: am Design » Baabelin kirjasto » Artikkelikatsaus: Huhtikuu 2007

Sun, 17 Jun 2007 15:04:26 +0000

[...] Artikkelia jonka ingressi kuuluu kokonaisuudessaan A fascinating study demonstrates how simply displaying aggregate data like Top 10 lists heavily influences the way people make decisions on social web sites ei yksinkertaisesti voi tiputtaa pois artikkelikatsauksesta. Ääni tekstin How Aggregate Displays Change User Behavior takana on Bokardon Joshua Porter, lopputulos taas – no, lukekaa itse artikkeli. [...]



By: Choix de design et influence sociale sur les utilisateurs

Thu, 07 Jun 2007 20:55:44 +0000

[...] (cette note est un traduction partielle et libre de l’article “How Aggregate Displays Change User Behavior“) [...]



By: Teaching Hacks.com » Blog Archive » links for 2007-05-12

Sat, 12 May 2007 02:23:04 +0000

[...] Bokardo » How Aggregate Displays Change User Behavior A fascinating study demonstrates how simply displaying aggregate data like Top 10 lists heavily influences the way people make decisions on social web sites. (tags: socialsoftware web2.0) [...]



By: » Links for 2007 04 23

Tue, 08 May 2007 03:59:26 +0000

[...] Bokardo » How Aggregate Displays Change User Behavior - NYTimes "Is Justin Timberlake the product of Cumulative Advantage?" Paper by Duncan Watts. They created 8 different environments for music download with the same songs. After some time, the top10 lists on the different worlds were different. No intrinsic quality induces popularity but aggregated activity and display (tags: Timberlake, Watts, music, popularity) [...]



By: links for 2007-05-04 (Leapfroglog)

Fri, 04 May 2007 06:17:47 +0000

[...] Bokardo » How Aggregate Displays Change User Behavior I’m reading too much Bokardo lately. This is Porter’s analysis of a New York Times piece on the effect of showing popularity scores for items on social web sites. Good to keep in mind when coming up with aggregate data views. (tags: socialsoftware popularity feedback behaviour) [...]



By: Wisdom or crowds, or just crowdiness of crowds? « Lightspeed Venture Partners Blog

Tue, 01 May 2007 21:39:00 +0000

[...] Josh Porter at Bodarko draws the opposite conclusion, that This result has huge implications for all social web sites, especially those that show aggregate data. Digg, for example, shows aggregate data everywhere on the site. This experiment, in addition to several other issues that I wrote about in Digg’s Design Dilemma, suggest that the results there are socially influenced to such an extent that it would be hard indeed to know where the quality lies… [...]



By: tmulligan

Sat, 28 Apr 2007 17:50:52 +0000

also regarding catherine's comment and the influence of bandwagon behavior on elections, my concern is more about how this can be (and i believe has been) effectively used to split, erode, and ultimately nullify support for fledgling parties with agendas that appear relatively palatable to a fairly large portion of the population — resulting in predictably short term strategies taken in hopes of suffering a lesser evil... i'm speaking here about the US, of course, but it strikes me that a) we definitely need additional parties along with a more representative system of power sharing (coalitions, etc) as is the habit with many democracies the world over these days and b) that if bookmarking is effectively voting (as has been suggested elsewhere on Bokardo), it's no small consolation that when it comes to the internet, at least there are no set limitations on our voting — we need only struggle with our own susceptibility to hype and hyperbole and not the cunning of the Karl Roves of the world...



By: tmulligan

Sat, 28 Apr 2007 17:19:52 +0000

interesting indeed, but with reference to Bell's comment i would point out that in a recent test of a community site for an open source software project, my colleagues and i were surprised to learn that the top and very bottom of almost every page were consistently hot spots... -t



By: Michael

Sat, 28 Apr 2007 09:24:42 +0000

So if you are a musician and if you have uploaded a song to a music community, then just download the song as often as possible and your song will be famous.



By: Noah Brier

Mon, 23 Apr 2007 16:22:46 +0000

I didn't think of this until I read your entry, but Watts' article works right along with the ideas put forth in Wisdom of Crowds. The aggregate displays are really no different than telling people how many jelly beans others were guessing: It takes the independence out of the decision. Interesting stuff, thanks Josh.



By: catherine

Fri, 20 Apr 2007 03:18:19 +0000

Interesting research and results. It demonstrates too why reporting election results before polls close can affect the outcome. People like to back 'winners'.