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Preview: Alex Barnett blog : podcast, SaaS, SOA, webservices

Alex Barnett blog : podcast, SaaS, SOA, webservices



Tags: podcast, SaaS, SOA, webservices



 



Podcast interviews - smart people in the world of the web

Sun, 20 Jan 2008 15:41:00 GMT

One of the fun parts of my job at Bungee Labs is to partner up with Ted and interview some smart people in the world of the web. We publish these as a podcast series (the Bungee Line - podcast feed here) over on the BCDN blog. If you have ideas about someone you think we should interview, let me know! We're focusing on topics we think web developers might be interested in the worlds of software as a service and web app development, in particular profiling web apis. Related topics are good too. I've listed out below our most recent podcasts below...plenty more in the works (previous podcasts are listed here). Hope you like :-) Alan Lewis on eBay Desktop and eBay APIs "As product manager for eBay Desktop, Alan Lewis relies on the same web APIs that eBay makes available to all developers. In this edition of the Bungee Line, Alan tells us about what the eBay Desktop is, how it came about, and various details about eBay’s developer program and web APIs. We ask Alan about eBay’s position Oauth and on open source."  Toby Segaran on “Programming Collective Intelligence” "Since the publication of his O’Reilly book Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications, Toby Segaran has become well noted for his ability to explain easily-understandable algorithms for the kind of deeply complex problems involved in social applications. Toby joins Alex and Ted to discuss some of the high-level concepts that he tackles in his book." Jon Aizen of Dapper.net "Jon Aizen joins Alex and Ted to explain how Dapper.net provides a no-fee tool for making almost any structured web site data accessible via a REST API. In a past life, Jon was involved in creating The Internet Archive. Jon also helps the Bungee Line introduce romantic intrigue into the podcast. Punditry Alert! At the end of this show, Ted and Alex speculate a bit about Android, Google’s open source mobile device platform, the Apache License, and whether Robert Love is involved. Please consider this as another demonstration of Ted’s idiocy, brought to you by the Bungee Line." Jeff Barr on Amazon Web Services (Part 2) "In part 2 of our interview with Amazon Web Services evangelist Jeff Barr, Alex and Ted ask Jeff about Flexible Payment Service, virtual user group meetings in Second Life, the Startup Project, and pry at Jeff’s views of possible futures of technologies that developers might anticipate." Jeff Barr on Amazon Web Services (Part 1) "Developer evangelist for Amazon Web Services, Jeff Barr tells Alex and Ted about how he became a native Amazonian, his recent visit to “The Business of API’s Conference,” and a bunch of stuff on Amazon Web Services, including: Mechanical Turk, EC2, and S3. Additionally, Jeff explains the newly announced S3 Service Level Agreement*."[...]



Scalability at Amazon (notes)

Sun, 01 Apr 2007 13:17:00 GMT

Werner Vogels, CTO at Amazon.com spoke at Supernova 2006 on the topic of Scalability at Amazon and the talk is available as a podcast at IT Conversations (thanks to James Governor for the link).

I made some notes as I listened this morning and thought I'd share:

A services business. Amazon.com is a platform. NBA.com is an application built on Amazon.com

If your online business is successful and you experience a 1000-fold increase in traffic you want your site to stay up! Building, operating and maintaining infrastructure that can be ‘always on’ and scale and is hard.  Wouldn't it be nice to pay-as-you-go, rather than investing your capital up-front?

You need infrastructure that can incrementally scale. In 1995 Amazon.com had 1m books in its catalogue. That was the beginning.  Now it has 35 different stores, not just books. Growing our business is not just a matter of buying bigger databases. Amazon has gone beyond that point.

Internally, Amazon is now a completely service oriented architecture (SOA).

A single Amazon.com page is made up of 100 to 150 individual web services.

What does 'scalability' actually mean? It means that if you add resources to the system the performance needs to increase proportional to the resources that you’ve added. Many of the academic algorithms don’t work like this. Many of the two-phase commit traditional transactional stuff doesn’t work like this. In general, the load on the network relevant to the application increases more than the magnitude of n. It doesn’t mean just handling more requests, it also means handling larger datasets. It needs to be able to add nodes to the system to achieve fault tolerance. It means that if you add bigger nodes you should be able to take advantage of more processing and more memory.  It means that the more bigger nodes you add, the fewer people you require to actually maintain them and that as you add more nodes that system should not become more unstable. It means being more cost effective.

Target came to us and asked 'we really love what you've done with Amazon - can you do that for us?' Our interaction with Target made us realize we could become a platform rather than just a single application. Different sets of Amazon Enterprise web services: content generation and discoverability; identity; inventory management;  fulfillment and customer service; order processing, payment and fraud protection. You can mix and mash these services.

Those services that are consumed by partners are guaranteed as 'always on'.

Cost effectiveness is scale.

Unexpected uses and applications built on top of our web services that we couldn't predict.

Our goal was expose all the atomic pieces that Amazon was really good at and to do that at scale and as web services.

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Alex Barnett Podcasts

Sat, 23 Sep 2006 19:58:00 GMT

Alex Barnett Podcasts - I like podcasting, here are the links to them. 2008 - Podcasts for the Bungee Line Nate Bowler, CTO of @Task, July 20 2008 @task (or AtTask) is a Utah-based tech company providing a comprehensive, web-based project and portfolio-management package delivered in both a SaaS and on-premise model with a very rich web API set. We talked with Nate about the evolution of their web services design and @task's future product plans in light of the market opportunities presented by the availability of the increasing number of 3rd party programmable web services." Steve Bjorg, Founder and CTO of MindTouch, June 20 2008 "Prior to founding MindTouch and Steve worked in advanced strategies at Microsoft focusing on distributed systems and web services. We talked with Steve about MindTouch platform, its rich set of web APIs and the implications of a programmable wiki. But MindTouch goes beyond providing open source wiki collaboration and content management - it's delivering a leading edge application integration and development platform called MindTouch Deki. Michael Coté, an industry analyst with RedMonk (analyst firm) picked up on both the podcast interview and news of the latest release of MinTouch Deki." Update from John Musser of ProgrammableWeb, April 14 2008 "ProgrammableWeb’s John Musser returns to the Bungee Line to give us an update on the API action of early 2008. Alex and Ted apologize for the unfortunate audio treatment to the Bungee sound in the previous episode, promising “never again!” In related news, check out the new intro music for our “Cool Web Tips” segment." Developer Community Management with Jono Bacon, March 14 2008 "There are few developer communities as large and distributed as that of Ubuntu, perhaps the most popular brand of GNU/Linux distributions available today. Jono Bacon is the first official community manager for Ubuntu. He joins to tell us what he has learned in his 18 months of working with this vast and disparate community." Social Design with Joshua Porter, Jan 30 2008 "Joshua Porter is a usability consultant, web designer, researcher and blogger specializing in the art of social design for the web whose experience includes five years at world-renowned User Interface Engineering. Josh’s blog (Bokardo.com) is a must-read favorite for UI and web designers and is finishing up his first book, to be published in the next few weeks (details below)." Alan Lewis on eBay Desktop and eBay APIs, January 15 2008 "As product manager for eBay Desktop, Alan Lewis relies on the same web APIs that eBay makes available to all developers. In this edition of the Bungee Line, Alan tells us about what the eBay Desktop is, how it came about, and various details about eBay’s developer program and web APIs. We ask Alan about eBay’s position Oauth and on open source." 2007 - Podcasts for the Bungee Line  Toby Segaran on “Programming Collective Intelligence”, December 13 2007 "Since the publication of his O’Reilly book Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications, Toby Segaran has become well noted for his ability to explain easily-understandable algorithms for the kind of deeply complex problems involved in social applications. Toby joins Alex and Ted to discuss some of the high-level concepts that he tackles in his book." Jon Aizen of Dapper.net, November 17 2007 "Jon Aizen joins Alex and Ted to explain how Dapper.net provides a no-fee tool for making almost any structured web site data accessible via a REST API. In a past life, Jon was involved in creating The Internet Archive. Jon also helps the Bungee Line introduce romantic intrigue into the podcast. Punditry Alert! At the end of this show, Ted and Alex speculate a bit about Android, Google’s open source mobile device platform, the Apache License, and whether Robert Love is involved. Please consider this as another demonstration of Ted’s [...]