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Last Build Date: Tue, 30 May 2017 06:08:00 +0000

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The big asks of British Airways

Tue, 30 May 2017 06:08:00 +0000

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The big asks of British Airways

It’s hard to know what to fully make of the dreadful mess in which British Airways finds itself today. It follows over three full days of massive disruption to the airline’s business that has resulted in wide scale flight cancellations around the world, huge queues at terminals at the UK’s major airports and many in other countries, and a severe hit on reputation and trust that could cost BA dearly. According to BA, a computer systems failure led to all this. It was caused by a power outage at a data centre near Heathrow airport in London on Saturday May 27, they said. That event knocked out all the airline’s means of managing flights, aircraft movements, passenger bookings, check-ins, baggage handling, you name it, even their phone systems. The impact was global, affecting operations everywhere. The result has been ugly scenes on the TV screens in every broadcaster’s news bulletins throughout this past weekend and during the Monday Bank Holiday in the UK, showing airport terminals packed with crowds looking for answers and solutions that nobody was able to answer or fully deliver. It’s been splashed across the front pages of newspapers here and worldwide, every day for three days.

First published as The big asks of British Airways on NHC




How to play your part in fighting fake news

Tue, 09 May 2017 06:21:00 +0000

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How to play your part in fighting fake news

One of the scourges of modern connected times is the rise of so-called fake news, a phenomenon that’s invasive and pervasive and a driver of distrust about what you read, see and hear online as well as fear, uncertainty and doubt about the sources that publish it. And not only such reactions upon immediate discovery, but also the unwitting spread of fake news by those who publish, talk about or share such content without knowing it’s false. It’s not new by any means – in the pre-internet days, it was called propaganda. Today, though, with the vast connectedness with others we enjoy via the global internet, it is so easy to amplify falsehoods, wittingly or unwittingly, with a quick retweet here and a Facebook share or like there. Add to this the overt and covert acts of states, corporations with hidden agendas, political activists with multiple agendas, and anyone with a subjective view and an internet connection, and it’s not hard to see that we’re in a time of ongoing distrust. But with the rise of such a scourge comes increasing awareness by people online that what you see too often isn’t what you actually get. More people no longer

First published as How to play your part in fighting fake news on NHC




Call for entries for UK Social Media Communications Awards 2017

Sat, 06 May 2017 11:24:00 +0000

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Call for entries for UK Social Media Communications Awards 2017

For seven successive years, the UK Social Media Communications Awards contest (hashtag: #somecomms) has been a benchmark of good and best practices in the roles and uses of social media in organisational communication. This week, organisers Don’t Panic Events announced the call for entries for the eighth annual competition: The UK Social Media Communications Awards celebrate the very best in UK social media communications and reward the individuals, companies and organisations who are using online platforms to communicate in fresh and innovative ways. The awards are open to all corporate, creative, design, digital, marketing, advertising, media and public relations organisations that are based in the UK. The 2017 awards will attract over 300 digital and communications professionals from across the UK and will be presented at a prestigious awards dinner on the 20 October 2017 at the Montcalm Marble Arch, London. If you’d like to participate and compete to win one or more of the awards, here’s how: Look at the categories to decide which one(s) you’d like to enter for. Download the entry form (a Word document). You’ll need to fill out a separate entry form for each category if you plan to submit more than one entry. Gather

First published as Call for entries for UK Social Media Communications Awards 2017 on NHC


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Artificial intelligence survey finds UK public broadly optimistic

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 11:20:00 +0000

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Artificial intelligence survey finds UK public broadly optimistic

Support for ‘machine learning’ depended on what it would be used for, with mass unemployment among main fears

First published as Artificial intelligence survey finds UK public broadly optimistic on NHC




For Immediate Release 84: the ‘limited return engagement’ episode

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 09:40:00 +0000

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For Immediate Release 84: the ‘limited return engagement’ episode

Recording episode 84 of the For Immediate Release podcast with Shel Holtz yesterday evening was like stepping into a new – but, at the same time, familiar – room to start a friendly conversation. It was The Hobson and Holtz Report again as we discussed a handful of highly-topical issues: Will social media will be a significant factor in the snap election called for by UK Prime Minister Theresa May? We also considered the role of social media in the French presidential election. Social media evidently had a larger-than-apparent impact on advertisers that pulled their commercials from Fox News’s “O’Reilly Factor,” the US cable news network’s biggest show. The Telegraph newspaper in the UK has launched a daily audio show specifically for the Google Home smart speaker/voice appliance. Could Facebook’s AR, VR, add hardware plans spell the end for smartphones (and anything else with a screen)? Google’s plans to add an ad blocker to Chrome could be a game changer. In addition, regular contributor Dan York reported on a plethora of topics, including Mastodon’s growth and video ads on Twitter. Links to all the discussion topics are on Contentle. Download the show or listen right here: This episode continues the

First published as For Immediate Release 84: the ‘limited return engagement’ episode on NHC


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Generation Z vs Millennials: There’s quite a difference

Mon, 24 Apr 2017 06:21:00 +0000

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Generation Z vs Millennials: There’s quite a difference

For much of the past decade, Millennials has been the generation that was the comparative one whenever anyone talked about behavioural and other differences between generations in contemporary society. Not only in the cultural and consumer contexts but also in the workplace. It’s fair to say that marketers and brand managers now understand a great deal about that generation in terms of behaviours, expectations, preferences and other consumer indicators. Employers understand much about them in terms of workplace expectations and behaviours. Yet I wonder whether there’s a fixation on Millennials that doesn’t see how time has passed and that there’s a next generation that requires attention, far more than has been given thus far, apparently. That generation is the so-called Generation Z and it comprises young people with markedly different characteristics to the generation immediately before, ie Millennials. As a quick reminder, this is the generational sequence since the mid 20th century according to Wikipedia, working backwards from today: Generation Z born mid 1990s to early 2000s Generation Y aka Millennials born early 1980s to mid 1990s Generation X born mid 1960s to late 1970s Baby Boomers born mid 1940s to early 1960s When considering each of these generation groups,

First published as Generation Z vs Millennials: There’s quite a difference on NHC