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God Is Approachable

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

(image) To each of you and to all of us, God is approachable, the Father is attainable, the way is open...

The Urantia Book, (5:1.8)




God Lives Within You

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

(image) What a mistake to dream of God far off in the skies when the spirit of the Universal Father lives within your own mind!

The Urantia Book, (5:2.3)




Sooner Or Later

Sun, 21 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

(image) Sooner or later, these concealed truths of the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of men will emerge to effectually transform the civilization of all mankind.

The Urantia Book, (194:2.8)




The Essence Of Beauty

Sat, 20 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

(image) Love is the ancestor of all spiritual goodness, the essence of the true and the beautiful.

The Urantia Book, (192:2.1)




Not An Accident

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

(image) Mortal man is not an evolutionary accident. There is a precise system, a universal law, which determines the unfolding of the planetary life plan on the spheres of space.

The Urantia Book, (49:1.6)




The Right Direction

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

(image) The important thing is not the rapidity of your progress but rather its certainty. Your actual achievement is not so important as the fact that the direction of your progress is Godward.

The Urantia Book, (147:5.7)




Meekness

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

(image) "You do well to be meek before God and self-controlled before men, but let your meekness be of spiritual origin..."

Jesus, The Urantia Book, (149:6.11)




The Lord's Prayer controversy

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

Here is a true example of a tempest in a teapot regarding the inerrancy of the Bible: Accepting Pope Francis' revised 'Our Father' would imply Jesus was wrong by Andrew Guernsey. As you may have heard, Pope Francis made the case that the long-accepted translation of the Lord's Prayer in the Bible might be improved. He suggested that a slight difference in the translation of one of its phrases might be a closer representation of the actual working of the Father; he suggested changing "lead us not into temptation" to "do not let us fall into temptation." We actually think it is a better translation; furthermore it is a closer interpretation of the Lord's Prayer in The Urantia Book, too, which reveals this phrase to be "save us from temptation." More on that below; but here are some pertinent snips from the article: "January 15, 2018 (LifeSiteNews) – As the press widely reported, Pope Francis has suggested changing the text of Our Father from "lead us not into temptation" to "do not let us fall into temptation." "Pope Francis told TV2000 channel that to pray that God would "lead us not into temptation," as Christians have prayed for two millennia, 'is not a good translation because it speaks of a God who induces temptation.' Pope Francis insists that the Our Father's translation should be changed to render God's agency passive regarding temptation because 'I am the one who falls; it's not him pushing me into temptation to then see how I have fallen. A father doesn't do that, a father helps you to get up immediately. It's Satan who leads us into temptation, that's his department.' "Pope Francis' comments regarding the Our Father, however, are not merely esoteric issues of proper translation. Rather, Pope Francis' remarks imply that the words of Jesus Christ themselves are objectively erroneous, and that he as pope has the power to change them." Click to read more ____________ If you decide to wade through this article, your eyes may glaze over, as mine did. It is a lengthy, scholarly, and detailed thesis regarding the original translation: how it was done, who did it, divine inspiration, "dire implications" of the Pope's suggestion, the Ten Commandments," etc, etc. In my view this controversy is an example of those who, like the Scribes and Pharisees, "strain out the gnat and swallow the camel." Or, as in this Urantia Book passage, a case of maybe trying a little too hard to get the point across: 48:7.30 28. The argumentative defense of any proposition is inversely proportional to the truth contained. Why be so concerned over this phrase, or the Pope's suggestion about it? Do we really believe that God will not approve of us if we use one or the other of these phrases? Is God so petty that he will not hear us if we don't adhere to the Biblical version of this prayer? I suspect that this is the very reason that Jesus was so reluctant to leave writings behind; he may have seen ahead and he maybe knew that this sort of thing could happen...he did not want his words to become stumbling blocks for his children. When he prayed, he prayed from the heart, and we can do the same. The Simple Message There's a simple message contained in this simple prayer that Jesus gave us. It has five basic themes: Acknowledgment and praise of God Acknowledgment of his kingdom which comes as a result of doing his holy will A prayer for sustenance through our lives A prayer to strengthen us for forgiving our brethren, and finally a prayer to be delivered from evil But, true to form, those who believe in the inerrancy of Scripture can manage to ruin it for the sincere seeker by suggesting that the Biblical words - and ONLY those words - are the true wo[...]



Fair, Just, Patient, And Kind

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 07:00:00 MST

(image) You should realize that there is a great reward of personal satisfaction in being first just, next fair, then patient, then kind.

The Urantia Book, (28:6.8)