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Preview: Ben Shapiro from Creators Syndicate

Ben Shapiro from Creators Syndicate



Creators Syndicate is an international syndication company that represents cartoonists and columnists of the highest caliber.



Last Build Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2018 09:58:18 -0800

 



The Virtue-Signaling Anti-Virtue Crowd for 01/10/2018

Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0800

Imagine it's late 2011. The world just found out about Jerry Sandusky, former assistant Penn State football coach who would be convicted of repeatedly raping children in 2012. Penn State higher-ups, in an attempt to turn the focus of the scandal away from the school, decide to turn an annual banquet into a celebration of those fighting child rape. They call up head coach Joe Paterno. They call up President Graham Spanier. They call up athletic director Tim Curley. All of them give long, brave speeches about the evils of sexual exploitation of children resulting in rousing applause from all the Penn State boosters. All the attendees wear pins showing their solidarity with molestation victims. The event is nationally televised.

You'd be disgusted, wouldn't you? You'd think to yourself, "Perhaps it isn't a good idea for a school that just became nationally renowned for one of the worst sex scandals in modern American history to preach about its commitment to the kiddies."

Updated: Wed Jan 10, 2018




America's Left in the Grip of Insanity for 01/03/2018

Wed, 03 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0800

President Trump is unpopular. He's unpopular because he's boorish, crude and silly; he's unpopular because he has a unique capacity to turn winning news cycles into referenda on his use of Twitter. But the United States under President Trump hasn't seen any serious anti-liberty revanchism. In fact, under Trump, regulations have dropped precipitously; the economy continues its pattern of growth; and press freedoms have actually been strengthened. Despite popular opinion, women aren't on the verge of enslavement into Vice President Mike Pence's "Handmaid's Tale," nor are black Americans in danger of resegregation or political disenfranchisement.

Yet while Iranians protest against a regime that reportedly hangs homosexuals from cranes, members of the hard left in the United States insist that protesters against the Trump administration demonstrate bravery similar to that of Iranians risking death by an Islamist regime. Huffington Post political commentator Alex Mohajer tweeted: "The #IranianProtests, the #Resistance, and @WomensMarch are all the same. Across the world, people are fighting autocracies and oppressive regimes. @realDonaldTrump is NO DIFFERENT than the oppressive Ayatollahs in Iran." Oddly, that movement of solidarity hasn't prompted those who walked in the Women's March on Washington to say a single word in support of the Iranian protesters to this point.

Updated: Wed Jan 03, 2018




Time to Defund the United Nations for 12/27/2017

Wed, 27 Dec 2017 00:00:00 -0800

Last week, Democrats and many in the mainstream media became highly perturbed by the Trump administration's suggestion that the United States might tie continued foreign aid to support for its agenda abroad. Foreign dictators agreed. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who spent the last year arresting dissidents, announced, "Mr. Trump, you cannot buy Turkey's democratic free will with your dollars, our decision is clear."

Herein lies the great irony of the United Nations: While it's the Mos Eisley of international politics — a hive of scum and villainy — and it votes repeatedly to condemn the United States and Israel, the tyrannies that constitute the body continue to oppress their own peoples. Among those who voted last week to condemn the U.S. for recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital and moving its embassy to Jerusalem were North Korea, Iran, Yemen and Venezuela. Why exactly should the United States ever take advice from those nations seriously?

Updated: Wed Dec 27, 2017




Does Yes Ever Mean Yes? for 12/20/2017

Wed, 20 Dec 2017 00:00:00 -0800

Over the weekend, Jessica Bennett, gender editor of The New York Times — yes, that's a real title — wrote a piece titled "When Saying 'Yes' Is Easier Than Saying 'No'." She argued that in many cases, women say yes to sex but actually don't want to do so: "Sometimes 'yes' means 'no,' simply because it is easier to go through with it than explain our way out of the situation. Sometimes 'no' means 'yes,' because you actually do want to do it, but you know you're not supposed to lest you be labeled a slut. And if you're a man, that 'no' often means 'just try harder' — because, you know, persuasion is part of the game." Bennett continues by arguing that consent is actually societally defined, that "our idea of what we want — of our own desire — is linked to what we think we're supposed to want."

But Bennett offers no clear solutions to this issue. If it's true that women say yes but mean no, are men supposed to read minds? If a woman says no but a man seduces her until she says yes, is the initial no supposed to take precedence over the final yes?

Updated: Wed Dec 20, 2017




How to Deal With Bullies for 12/13/2017

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 -0800

This week, America found a new cause to rally around: Keaton Jones. Keaton is a middle school student who was apparently viciously bullied at school for the crime of having a scar on his head from the removal of a tumor. His mother filmed a video of him crying as he explained that other kids had poured milk over his head and mocked him; through his tears, Jones questioned why kids treat one another this way.

The video was absolutely heartbreaking.

Updated: Wed Dec 13, 2017




Fiscal Responsibility or Lower Taxes? for 12/06/2017

Wed, 06 Dec 2017 00:00:00 -0800

This week, Republicans in the Senate finally passed their long-awaited tax reform plan. It lowers individual income tax rates across the board, although it does claw back some government revenue in the form of elimination of state and local tax deductions. It drops corporate tax rates as well. It is, in other words, a significant but not atypical Republican tax cut designed to boost economic growth by allowing Americans to keep more of their own money.

The tax cut will almost certainly increase the deficit, however. Even with dynamic scoring — the assumption that the economy will grow at a faster clip thanks to tax cuts — the tax cuts could lead to $1 trillion in lower revenue through 2027. This has led some conservatives to sour on tax reform altogether, rightly saying that Republicans were, until a few months ago, complaining incessantly about former President Obama's blowout deficits and the burgeoning national debt, which now stands at a cool $20.5 trillion. That doesn't include long-term unfunded liabilities, which are slated to bring the debt to some $70 to 75 trillion in coming decades.

Updated: Wed Dec 06, 2017




Bill Clinton Won After All for 11/29/2017

Wed, 29 Nov 2017 00:00:00 -0800

Two weeks ago, it seemed that former President Bill Clinton was finished as a public figure. A variety of public intellectuals on the left had consigned him to the ashtray of history; they'd attested to their newfound faith in his rape accuser Juanita Broaddrick or torn him to shreds for having taken advantage of a young intern, Monica Lewinsky.

The moral goal was obvious: Set up a new intolerance for the sexual abuse of women. The political goal was even more obvious: Show that Democrats are morally superior to Republicans, and in doing so, shame Republicans into staying home rather than voting for Alabama Republican senatorial candidate Roy Moore, who has been credibly accused of sexual assault of minors.

Updated: Wed Nov 29, 2017




The Sultans of America and Their Harems for 11/22/2017

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 00:00:00 -0800

Americans have been buried in the last six weeks by a blizzard of reports of sexual harassment, assault, misconduct and malfeasance from our politicians, journalists and Hollywood glitterati. In the last week alone, we've seen a picture of Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., during his pre-senatorial days placing his hands over a sleeping woman's breasts; the suspension of New York Times journalist Glenn Thrush for allegedly harassing young female journalists; and eight women telling the Washington Post that fabled television host Charlie Rose had made unwanted sexual advances ranging from groping to lewd phone calls. That follows on the heels of allegations of child molestation against Alabama Senate Republican nominee Roy Moore, confirmed accusations of unwanted exposure from comedian Louis C.K. and allegations of sexual assault against Russell Simmons. Every day, it seems, a new member of the cultural aristocracy comes tumbling down.

What's behind all of it? Why did it take so long for this avalanche to start? And what does it tell us about the culture we've built?

Updated: Wed Nov 22, 2017




What Are Our Representatives Supposed to Do? for 11/15/2017

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 00:00:00 -0800

During America's founding era, a significant debate took place about the nature of representation in a democratically elected government. Were representatives supposed to act as simple proxies for their constituents? Or were they supposed to exercise independent judgment? Edmund Burke was a forceful advocate for the latter position: A representative, he said, was supposed to exercise his "mature judgment, his enlightened conscience. And "he ought not to sacrifice to you, to any man, or to any set of men living." John Stuart Mill, too, believed that representatives ought to act independently; he said: "A person whose desires and impulses are his own...is said to have a character. One whose desires and impulses are not his own, has no character, no more than a steam-engine has a character."

Then there were those who argued that to exercise independent judgment would be to betray voters, that they sent you there with a mission, and your job is to fulfill that mission. This so-called delegate view of representation is supremely transactional — we only bother electing representatives in this view in order to do the work we're not willing to do. They aren't elected to spend time learning about the issues or broaden their perspective beyond the regional. They're there to do what you want them to do.

This debate has finally come to a head recently, not because sectional representatives have forgone their voters but because characterless people are running for office more and more. Those who believe in the Burkean model oppose such people — we say that to put those without character in charge of policy is to leave our future in the hands of the untrustworthy. Those who believe in the delegate model can embrace such people — they say that so long as the representative votes the right way on the issues, they can murder dogs in the backyard or allegedly molest young girls. Nina Burleigh's perspective on then-President Bill Clinton falls into this second camp. "I would be happy to give him a blow job just to thank him for keeping abortion legal," she said. So does Rep. Mo Brooks' perspective on Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore. He said: "Roy Moore will vote right ... That's why I'm voting for Roy Moore."

Updated: Wed Nov 15, 2017




What an American Hero Looks Like for 11/08/2017

Wed, 08 Nov 2017 00:00:00 -0800

This week, a discharged Air Force airman with a criminal record of domestic abuse, including cracking the skull of his infant stepson, stepped into a church in rural Texas and murdered 26 people, at least a dozen of them children. Americans broke out into their usual arguments over gun control and whether "thoughts and prayers" are helpful; we argued over politicizing tragedy and legislating away rights.

But each time an evil human being decides to attack innocents, it isn't the Twitter battles that stand between the monsters and children. It's heroes. It's men like Stephen Willeford.

In a vaccum, Willeford would be despised by the media. He's a former NRA instructor — you know, the National Rifle Association, a "domestic terror group" devoted to allowing bloodbaths, according to the left. He probably voted for President Trump. His family has lived in Sutherland Springs for four generations. He's parochial enough to attend church regularly. You know, he's a typical bitter clinger.

Updated: Wed Nov 08, 2017




The Swamp Is D.C. for 11/01/2017

Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 -0700

Get ready for a word problem.

Paul Manafort was Donald Trump's presidential campaign chairman. He allegedly had deep, long-lasting, corrupt ties to Russia for which he will likely go to prison if convicted — he's just been indicted by special counsel Robert Mueller. According to the indictment, he contracted with the Podesta Group — headed by Tony Podesta, a longtime Democratic lobbyist and brother of former Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta — to run interference for the Ukrainian government under now-deposed leader Viktor Yanukovych. Podesta stepped down from the group on Monday amid the Manafort allegations.

Updated: Wed Nov 01, 2017




The Delusional Optimism of Both Sides for 10/25/2017

Wed, 25 Oct 2017 00:00:00 -0700

This week, President Trump went to battle with Gold Star widow Myeshia Johnson. Johnson's husband, Sgt. La David Johnson, was killed in Niger earlier this month. Trump called his widow to offer his condolences. But Myeshia Johnson apparently interpreted that call as a callously indifferent attempt to curry favor. She conveyed her displeasure to Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla., who promptly went public with it. Trump responded to Johnson's anger not with compassion but with indignation: He stated that he had never been callous toward her.

The most likely explanation for this hubbub is misinterpretation on one or both sides. The chances that Trump wanted to offend Johnson are slim and none. But it's not politically or morally wise for Trump to begin a public firefight with a grieving widow.

Updated: Wed Oct 25, 2017




'Raising Awareness' Isn't Helping Much for 10/18/2017

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 00:00:00 -0700

"Awareness must be raised."

"A spotlight must be brought to this crucial issue."

Updated: Wed Oct 18, 2017




The Power of Good for 10/04/2017

Wed, 04 Oct 2017 00:00:00 -0700

This week, an evil human being murdered nearly 60 Americans and wounded more than 500 others in Las Vegas. His attack was well-planned: The shooter had some 23 guns in his hotel room, including a semi-automatic rifle affixed with a "bump stock" allowing the shooter to operate the rifle like an automatic weapon; he had another 19 guns in his home. Video of the incident is chilling: the rat-a-tat of the gun raining bullets down on unsuspecting innocents from the hulking profile of the Mandalay Bay on the horizon, the wounded concertgoers screaming in the darkness.

But there was heroism, too.

Updated: Wed Oct 04, 2017




The Strategy of Going Too Far for 09/27/2017

Wed, 27 Sep 2017 00:00:00 -0700

There's a running argument on the right these days. It begins each time the left overreacts to a Trumpian move with wild radicalism, alienating Americans in the middle. Some on the right attribute the left's penchant for political hara-kiri to President Donald Trump's masterful manipulations — it's just part of his genius. But the more plausible argument is that Trump isn't playing anyone — he's perfectly authentic. And most importantly, he always goes just a bit too far.

Updated: Wed Sep 27, 2017




The End of the First Amendment for 09/20/2017

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:00:00 -0700

Last week, I visited the University of California, Berkeley.

The preparations for the visit were patently insane. First, the school charged the sponsor group, Young America's Foundation, a $15,000 security fee. Then, the school blocked off the upper level of the auditorium, fearful that radicals from the violent far-left-leaning group antifa would infiltrate the speech and begin hurling objects from the balcony onto the crowd below. Finally, the school ended up spending some $600,000 on additional policing, including the creation of cement barriers and hiring of hundreds of armed police officers for a prospective riot.

Updated: Wed Sep 20, 2017




Democrats' Newest Plan: Nationalized Health Care for 09/13/2017

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 00:00:00 -0700

On Monday, two seemingly unrelated headlines made the news. The first: America's national debt had finally reached $20 trillion. The second: New Jersey Democratic Sen. Cory Booker had finally come out in favor of Vermont independent Sen. Bernie Sanders' magical, mythical "Medicare-For-All" plan.

Of course, the two aren't unrelated at all. Once again, the Democratic Party is signing checks the country can't cash. Sanders' Medicare-For-All scheme would add some $13.8 trillion in spending over the first decade alone. Medicare already carries $58 trillion in unfunded liabilities, according to National Review. How unrealistic is Medicare-For-All? It's so unrealistic that the state of California has rejected a single-payer health care for being too expensive — and California currently has a Democratic supermajority in the state assembly.

Updated: Wed Sep 13, 2017




If Republicans Don't Make a Move, They Deserve to Lose for 09/06/2017

Wed, 06 Sep 2017 00:00:00 -0700

Politics is the art of shifting the playing field.

This is an art Republicans simply don't understand. Perhaps it's because they spend so much time attempting to stop the Democratic snowball from running downhill too quickly, but Republicans in power have an unfortunate tendency to conserve their political capital rather than invest it. That's unfortunate because political capital doesn't accrue when you save it; it degrades. Just as sticking your cash in a mattress is a bad strategy when it comes to investment, inaction in power is a bad strategy when it comes to politics.

Updated: Wed Sep 06, 2017




What Hurricane Harvey Teaches Us About Humanity for 08/30/2017

Wed, 30 Aug 2017 00:00:00 -0700

The pictures, videos and social media posts coming out of Houston, Texas, thanks to Hurricane Harvey are horrifying: children camped out on kitchen counters in order to avoid flooding; elderly women stuck in rest homes and up to their waist in water; tweets from local police departments reminding residents to bring axes into their attic in case they have to cut their way through their roof to escape rising waters. But just as many pictures and videos are inspirational: local men and women hopping into their boats and looking for victims to rescue; police carrying children out of flooded houses; Americans helping one another.

Whenever disaster strikes, we're always inspired by images of human beings helping one another. Disaster often brings out the best in us: our capacity for care, our bravery in risking our lives to help others. Then we're inevitably disappointed in our unending ability to leave those qualities behind the moment disaster ends. We'll rush into burning buildings to save each other, but we'll club each other on the head at political rallies.

Why?

Updated: Wed Aug 30, 2017




President Trump and the Politics of Attitude for 08/23/2017

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 -0700

Last week, President Trump ousted his White House chief strategist, Steve Bannon. Bannon was widely perceived as a divisive figure — a self-promoting rabid political attack dog dedicated to "winning" at all costs; a fellow who declared the website he used to run, Breitbart, a forum for the "alt-right." To put it mildly, Bannon wasn't well-liked. For months, he had been living on borrowed time at the White House and was marginalized by Trump in favor of now-chief of staff John Kelly, national security adviser H.R. McMaster, and senior advisers Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump, among others.

Bannon's firing caused a bit of a firestorm on the right, particularly after Bannon stated that "The Trump presidency that we fought for, and won, is over." He meant that Trump's allegiance to "nationalist populism" was over — that Trump was now surrounded by Democrats and generals.

Updated: Wed Aug 23, 2017