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Preview: Hillary Rodham Clinton from Creators Syndicate

Hillary Rodham Clinton from Creators Syndicate



Creators Syndicate is an international syndication company that represents cartoonists and columnists of the highest caliber.



Last Build Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:18:08 -0800

 



Talking It Over for 01/01/2008

Tue, 01 Jan 2008 00:00:00 -0800

EDITORS NOTE: The following column is the first syndicated column written by Hillary Clinton for Creators Syndicate. It was originally released on July 23, 1995. All subsequent columns are arranged beginning with those filed most recently (in 2000 just before Mrs. Clinton joined the Senate) and ending with her first columns written in 1995. — CREATORS SYNDICATE

On a recent trip to Arkansas, I had a sudden impulse to drive. We were staying at my mother's house in Little Rock and I needed to run some errands. So, on a quiet Friday afternoon, I jumped behind the wheel of a car and, much to the discomfort of my Secret Service detail, drove myself around town. For several hours, I enjoyed a marvelous sensation of personal freedom.

For me this brief taste of everyday life has come to represent the odd duality of my role as First Lady. On the one hand, I feel privileged to meet people and go places totally out of reach for most men and women. On the other hand, experiences that millions of Americans take for granted have become extraordinary for me.

Updated: Tue Jan 01, 2008




Talking It Over for 12/26/2000

Tue, 26 Dec 2000 21:00:00 -0800

When I was a child, we decorated our family tree on Christmas Eve. With only one to decorate, we could afford to wait until the last minute. So, it was a surprise when the Chief Usher and the Social Secretary came to me shortly after my husband's first inauguration to give me the news that it was time to begin planning for Christmas.

Christmas in the White House is magical. There are dozens of trees, dozens of parties and thousands of guests to prepare for. Every detail is planned and executed with the help of not only the White House staff, but also volunteers from all over the country.

Each First Family adds its unique mark to the holiday traditions — from the choice of a theme and a Christmas card, to the decision our family made to light a menorah during Hanukkah, and host a reception at the end of the holy month of Ramadan.

Updated: Tue Dec 26, 2000




Talking It Over for 12/19/2000

Tue, 19 Dec 2000 21:00:00 -0800

The Women's Bank occupies a one-room building in western India. The teller's counter is an old kitchen table covered with cloth. Bank clerks record all transactions by hand, on yellowed sheets that resemble worn-out telephone books. When I visited in 1995, I saw poor women who had walked 12 to 15 hours from their villages to take out loans — some as small as $1 — to invest in dairy cows, plows or goods that could be sold at market.

The most vivid image that has stayed with me from that trip happened there. Although the women in that room were from rural areas with little contact outside their communities, and although most of them certainly didn't speak English, they all stood together and sang as one, "We Shall Overcome."

Later that year, I traveled to Beijing as part of the US delegation to the UN Fourth World Conference on Women, an event that drew 50,000 women from around the world, 7,500 of them Americans. In Beijing, the United States joined 189 other states agreeing to the "Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action," a document that addressed 12 areas of concern regarding the advancement and status of women.

Updated: Tue Dec 19, 2000




Talking It Over for 12/12/2000

Tue, 12 Dec 2000 21:00:00 -0800

Updated: Tue Dec 12, 2000




Talking It Over for 12/05/2000

Tue, 05 Dec 2000 21:00:00 -0800

This week, an important tradition is taking place on Capitol Hill — the biannual orientation for newly-elected members of Congress. Unfortunately, our lawmakers are sharing the stage for a more somber undertaking — a lame-duck session called to finish work on the federal budget.

At midnight tonight, the 16th Continuing Resolution — the temporary spending bill passed to keep the government functioning in the absence of a budget — expires. After passing yet another CR, the members must turn immediately to the appropriations and other spending measures that remain, among them the important Labor-Health and Human Services- Education bill.

Before Congress left in November, a spirit of bipartisan compromise led to an agreement between administration and Hill negotiators on several issues important to Americans and key to the well-being of our country's families and children. Unfortunately, Congress left town for the November election before the bill was passed. Now, for our children's sake, I hope that the constructive spirit that led to an agreement on the Labor-HHS-Education bill will reemerge, preparing us to enter the 107th Congress — the first Congress of the 21st century — energized, optimistic and committed to progress and bipartisanship.

Updated: Tue Dec 05, 2000




Talking It Over for 11/21/2000

Tue, 21 Nov 2000 21:00:00 -0800

At times, over the past week, as I traveled with my family in Vietnam, I was overcome with emotion. Thirty years ago, when our countries were at war, I never could have imagined I'd see Vietnamese and Americans working side by side at an excavation site, searching for the remains of an American pilot. With us at the site were the pilot's two sons, looking on and hoping that, after all these years, they would finally bring their father home. It is a moment I will never forget.

I will also never forget the welcome that the Vietnamese people gave us when we arrived, stopping their bicycles and mopeds, smiling and waving as we passed by. We can never erase the past — nor will we completely erase the pain felt by so many men and women on both sides. But we can strive together to make a brighter future for all the people of Vietnam.

This will no doubt be one of our family's very last trips overseas while my husband is President. I wanted to join him on this historic visit to help strengthen relations between our countries, and to see firsthand the role that women are playing to build a more prosperous Vietnam.

Updated: Tue Nov 21, 2000




Talking It Over for 11/07/2000

Tue, 07 Nov 2000 21:00:00 -0800

It was nearly two years ago that I was first asked to consider running for the United States Senate from New York. The thought of trying to fill the shoes of one of this country's finest public servants, Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, was daunting. Yet, the prospect of continuing to work for the issues that Americans care about was the motivation I needed — at least to study the idea. Six months later, I stood with Senator Moynihan at his farm in Pindars Corners, prepared to embark on a listening tour of the state to hear what New Yorkers had to say.

The months between that day and my official announcement the following February offered an unprecedented opportunity to listen to New Yorkers from Brooklyn to Buffalo, Staten Island to Skaneateles. What I heard convinced me that the people of New York care about the same issues I have championed for 30 years-among them, the best education for our children, reliable and affordable health care, and dependable, high-quality child care.

I know that government is not the source of all our problems nor the solution to them. Rather, when people work hard to live up to their responsibilities, it's the role of government to help them make a better life for themselves and their families.

Updated: Tue Nov 07, 2000




Talking It Over for 10/31/2000

Tue, 31 Oct 2000 21:00:00 -0800

After the 1998 election, a survey of 18- to 24-year-olds conducted by the National Association of Secretaries of State drew this frightening conclusion: We may be witnessing the emergence of a permanent class of non-voters.

In 1993, the National Voter Registration Act, or "Motor Voter" law went into effect. Aimed at young voters especially, Motor Voter proved a stunning success. The idea of registering people to vote as they applied for a driver's license added 11 million new names to the list of registered voters.

But something happened on the way to the voting booth: They didn't come. Although Motor Voter was successful at adding millions to the rolls, the turnout was lower than for any election since 1924. Now we need to get those who've registered to actually go to the polls on Election Day.

Updated: Tue Oct 31, 2000




Talking It Over for 10/24/2000

Tue, 24 Oct 2000 21:00:00 -0700

Over the past five years, I have written nearly 300 columns, many of them about issues I have cared about and worked on for 30 years. As I look back over the list, I'm struck by the extraordinary opportunity this column has afforded me — the opportunity to bring these important topics to national and even international attention.

Only a few days remain in the 106th Congress, after which members return to their districts to campaign. Unfortunately, tCongress has not yet acted on several important fronts: They have failed to provide Americans with a Patient's Bill of Rights; they have not passed targeted tax credits for long-term care givers; and they have yet to pass the appropriations bill that would fund our education and child care proposals.

Congressional action has shown, though, that the spirit of bipartisanship can lead to the passage of important legislation, much of which I have written about in this space.

Updated: Tue Oct 24, 2000




Talking It Over for 10/17/2000

Tue, 17 Oct 2000 21:00:00 -0700

Many people in this country would be shocked to learn that a modern form of slavery is one of the fastest-growing criminal enterprises in the world.

According to Theresa Loar, the Director of the President's Interagency Council on Women, "Trafficking in women and children is now considered the third largest source of profit for organized crime, behind only drugs and guns."

Trafficking is distinguishable from the smuggling of human beings in one horrific detail. Trafficking moves people for the purpose of placing them in modern-day slavery or servitude.

Updated: Tue Oct 17, 2000




Talking It Over for 09/26/2000

Tue, 26 Sep 2000 21:00:00 -0700

For nearly eight years, this administration has worked to bring peace to some of the most troubled spots in the world — from Northern Ireland to the Balkans, Africa and the Middle East. But it is hard for us to make peace around the world unless we first commit ourselves to make peace within our own homes.

That is why it is critical that the Senate vote this week to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.

Congress first passed VAWA in 1994. Part of the President's crime bill, this landmark legislation improved the criminal justice system's response to domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking, and provided critical services to victims. Since its passage, VAWA has made a difference in the lives of countless women and children. Between 1993 and 1998 alone, violent attacks on women by an intimate partner declined 21 percent.

Updated: Tue Sep 26, 2000




Talking It Over for 09/12/2000

Tue, 12 Sep 2000 21:00:00 -0700

Let me describe an after-school scene you might recognize. A teenager is slouched on the couch in the family room, doing his homework in front of the television. It's 4 p.m. and he's watching reruns of a video music award program featuring performances by gangsta rappers whose lyrics are obscene and celebrate violence, and where some female singers sport costumes clearly designed to shock. A 15-year-old is sitting in her room with the door closed, surfing the web and talking to strangers in a teen chat room. The youngest son is in the basement with his friends, playing a video game where the one who kills the most wins.

Ask the harried mother or father who has worked a full day and is trying to get a meal on the table and you're likely to get this response: "I'm doing the best I can. And anyway, how do you even know there's a connection between violence on TV and the real world?"

In my 1996 book, "It Takes a Village," I wrote about just such a family and about the steady stream of articles, books and studies that have documented the harm the media's depictions of violence have on children. According to the research, saturating young minds with graphic and sensational violence prevents them from developing the emotional and psychological tools they need to deal with the threat and the reality of violence. Children become, in effect, numbed to violence.

Updated: Tue Sep 12, 2000




Talking It Over for 09/05/2000

Tue, 05 Sep 2000 21:00:00 -0700

Congress is back in session. With only a few weeks remaining, however, before they hit the campaign trail, lawmakers face a daunting task: They must finish work on 13 spending bills before they leave town.

At the top of the Republican leadership's list of priorities this week, though, is not an appropriations bill, but rather an attempt to override the President's veto of the estate tax bill - a measure that would extend sizable tax cuts to 54,000 of America's wealthiest families. The estate tax bill is just one illustrative piece of a $2 trillion tax cut proposal that, taken together, would spend our hard-won surplus and harm our economy.

The American people are too smart to favor unfair and fiscally irresponsible tax cuts. In fact, everywhere I go, hard-working middle-class citizens tell me that they want a government that responds to the pressing issues that affect their daily lives. They would support tax cuts targeted to help America's families afford health care, college tuition and long-term care, as well as to encourage corporate America to protect our environment and invest in our new markets.

Updated: Tue Sep 05, 2000




Talking It Over for 08/22/2000

Tue, 22 Aug 2000 21:00:00 -0700

When her friends and family talk about SuAnne Big Crow, they describe an energetic and good-hearted young woman — a gifted athlete who led the Pine Ridge High School girls' basketball team to the South Dakota state championship. An inspiration both on and off the court, SuAnne dreamed of returning to the reservation after college to work with young people, helping them avoid the pitfalls and dangers that confront so many young Native Americans.

Tragically, SuAnne would not live to see her dreams come true — she died in a horrible automobile accident. Her mother refused to let SuAnne's spirit die with her, seizing instead on the idea of building a center where the reservation's young people could find support, friends, recreation and counseling.

At a time when America is enjoying unprecedented prosperity, Pine Ridge has an unemployment rate approaching a staggering 75 percent. That is why the President included Pine Ridge in last summer's New Markets Initiative tour. Speaking to a large crowd on an incredibly hot and sticky day, he put the nation on notice that Pine Ridge is a good place to invest, and that the government would take the lead in developing private-public and government-nonprofit partnerships to improve the tribe's living conditions.

Updated: Tue Aug 22, 2000




Talking It Over for 08/15/2000

Tue, 15 Aug 2000 21:00:00 -0700

As I write this, my husband and I are about to leave Los Angeles, where we were privileged to speak to the 4,370 Democratic delegates, convened to nominate Al Gore for president and Joe Lieberman for vice-president.

As I contemplated what I wanted to say, not just to the delegates, but to the 10,000 volunteers, 15,000 members of the media and millions of Americans watching at home, I knew the most important message was "thank you."

When Bill, Al, Tipper and I climbed onto the campaign bus in 1992 after the convention, we began a journey that took us to the heartland of America. Along the way, we saw faces full of hope. But we also saw faces bleak with despair - the faces of fathers out of work, mothers trapped on welfare, and children without adequate medical care.

Updated: Tue Aug 15, 2000




Talking It Over for 08/08/2000

Tue, 08 Aug 2000 21:00:00 -0700

Earlier this summer, the President made an offer to the Republican leadership on Capitol Hill: If they would pass an affordable, voluntary Medicare prescription drug benefit, he would sign marriage penalty relief into law. Unfortunately, not only did they fail to pass a prescription drug bill, the marriage penalty bill they sent was regressive and expensive, benefiting the wealthiest taxpayers, and leaving the President no choice but to veto.

If you watched any of last week's Republican convention in Philadelphia, you heard a great deal about cutting taxes. What you didn't hear, though, was this number — $2 trillion — or nearly the total cost of the Republican proposals. Nor did you hear anything about the effect that these cuts would have on our nation's hard-won prosperity, nor that it would be the wealthiest Americans who would enjoy the lion's share of the financial windfall. Finally, you didn't hear about the President's own plan for affordable, targeted tax cuts.

The President's plan puts working families and children first, offering middle-class families substantially more benefits than the wealthy. Among other provisions, it includes targeted and affordable marriage penalty relief and help with college expenses. The College Opportunity Tax Cut provides a choice between a tax deduction or a 28 percent tax credit on up to $10,000 in college tuition. The President would also extend the child care tax credit to parents who stay at home, and help millions of working families by defraying up to 50 percent of child care expenses.

Updated: Tue Aug 08, 2000




Talking It Over for 07/25/2000

Tue, 25 Jul 2000 21:00:00 -0700

This week marks the 10th anniversary of one of the most far-reaching pieces of legislation ever enacted into law in this country. In 1990, for millions of Americans with disabilities, the Americans with Disabilities Act offered the hope of a brighter future. Before the ADA, the doors to opportunity and achievement were closed, discrimination was a way of life, talent was ignored, passion unimagined and beauty invisible.

With the passage of the ADA, activities once the sole province of the so-called "able-bodied" — dinner in a restaurant, a night at the theater, tickets to a baseball game — were, for the first time, not just a dream. But beyond dinner and the theater, the ADA, in concert with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, passed 25 years ago, offered the hope of a life without harassment or discrimination — a life where children would no longer be relegated to "special schools"; where capable adults could go to college, take a job, commute, and even pay taxes.

To mark the 10th anniversary of the ADA, the President and I chose the new FDR Memorial in Washington. There, we unveiled a series of initiatives designed to build on the foundation of this landmark legislation — initiatives intended to expand employment opportunities and strengthen the ADA's promise of equal treatment under the law.

Updated: Tue Jul 25, 2000




Talking It Over for 07/18/2000

Tue, 18 Jul 2000 21:00:00 -0700

On Jan. 1, 1892, a 15-year-old from Ireland arrived in the United States with her two brothers. When she stepped off the boat onto dry land, Annie Moore became the first immigrant to pass through the new federal processing facility at Ellis Island.

This week, as I toured the island, I thought about Annie and tried to imagine what it must have been like for her and the millions of others who followed — many of whom arrived in America speaking no English and carrying no more than the clothes on their backs, their hearts filled with hope.

In the 62 years between the day Annie walked through the Main Hall and 1954, when the federal government closed its most famous port of entry, over 12 million immigrants passed through those gates, profoundly affecting the country that they came to call home. Today, nearly 100 million — or 40 percent — of all Americans trace their ancestry back to relatives whose first taste of America came at Ellis Island.

Updated: Tue Jul 18, 2000




Talking It Over for 07/11/2000

Tue, 11 Jul 2000 21:00:00 -0700

Last month, the President announced that, at $211 billion, our budget surplus this year will be the largest in history. Over the next 10 years, the surplus — after protecting Medicare and Social Security — will reach almost $1.5 trillion, exceeding even our own projections of just four months ago.

Our booming economy did not occur by accident or coincidence. Rather, it came about because we maintained much-needed fiscal discipline, while expanding trade and investments in our people and our future. If we are to continue to enjoy these good times, we must not abandon the path that brought us to this place. We must instead identify and invest in our most pressing priorities.

Among these priorities is providing affordable and dependable medical care to the elderly and disabled — just what, 35 years ago, the Medicare system was created to do. But over the course of these last three decades, the face of medicine has changed, nowhere more than in the use and availability of prescription drugs.

Updated: Tue Jul 11, 2000




Talking It Over for 07/04/2000

Tue, 04 Jul 2000 21:00:00 -0700

"Imagine, for a moment, that we could all live underwater. The oceans are so vast that if we divided them up amongst us — all 6 billion of us on this planet — we would each have an ocean-view living room a mile long, a mile wide, and a ceiling 800 feet high."

That's quite a picture, isn't it? It's a picture painted for us recently by one of this country's foremost geophysicists, Dr. Marcia McNutt, who, along with Dr. Neil de Grasse Tyson, director of the renowned Hayden Planetarium in New York City, joined us in the East Room for the ninth in a series of Millennium Evenings at the White House — this one actually a matinee entitled "Exploration Under the Sea - Beyond the Stars."

The story of America is the story of exploration. For generations, we have endeavored to understand the unknown and expand the boundaries of our knowledge. From the explorers and seekers who ventured across the ocean to American shores, to the settlers who pushed westward, our history is told in the tales of those who strived to conquer the unknown.

Updated: Tue Jul 04, 2000