Subscribe: Fred's Head from APH
http://fredsheadcompanion.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
american printing  aph  blind  cvi  drawing  house blind  howe press  pictures  press  printing house  raised  students  tools 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Fred's Head from APH

Fred’s Head from APH, a Blindness Blog



Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answ



Updated: 2018-04-21T05:43:14.102-04:00

 



Throw Back Thursday: Tactile Drawing Tools

2018-04-19T08:35:04.756-04:00

Occasionally, like most museums, we will get a “box” in the mail.  Someone is cleaning house, and either they want to remain anonymous, or they absolutely, definitely do NOT want anything returned.  So, there is no return address.  Last week, I received such a box, carefully packed inside were a New Hall Braillewriter (serial# 3268, nothing special), and an old record album box full of drawing tools.  There were eight in total, all stamped with the Howe Press/Perkins School mark.  Now, I’ll admit, I don’t really like receiving these boxes.  Without documentation, we can’t establish ownership, and we’re reluctant to expend resources on things we do not own.  But these tools help tell the story of how our field made it possible for students who are blind or visually impaired to succeed in classes like geometry, or to make all sorts of maps and diagrams.  So our Throwback Thursday blog is a little long this week.  Mea culpa. In 1939, Edward Waterhouse, a math teacher at the Perkins School in Watertown, Massachusetts, was designing pioneering appliances to teach mathematics.  Waterhouse would go on to head both the Howe Press and the Perkins School, and was an influential educator in many ways.  In 1939, there were no commercially available adapted tools that would allow students with visual impairments to draw raised lines for themselves.  The production of tactile graphics was consigned solely to the braille presses who were producing maps, or to individual teachers making their own diagrams using tactile materials, glue, and household tools.  By 1941, the Howe Press, the manufacturing arm at Perkins, had introduced “Geometry Instruments,” which we think meant a compass with a star wheel, a braille protractor, a tracing wheel, and three braille rulers. In 1947, the Perkins Annual Report says that their geometry instruments were being made at the Howe Press machine shop, now in Watertown (having moved that year from Boston).  In 1950, the category was renamed “Mathematical Instruments.”  You could buy all six drawing tools in 1956 for $13.45.  Meanwhile, Harry P. Sewell was part of an ad-hoc research council in the 1940s in New York that met at the American Foundation for the Blind.  He received a patent for his own raised line writing system in 1952.  By 1955, Sewell was manufacturing the kits in a small shop and distributing them through AFB.   (A version is still available today from MaxiAids.)  Sewell’s kit involved a clipboard with a rubber coating, a plastic stylus, and a clear plastic film.  Pressing the stylus into the film (or into aluminum sheets) produced a raised line drawing on the opposite side of the film. Whether inspired by Sewell, or encouraged by the steady sales of their drawing tools (we don’t really know the whole story yet), by May of 1968, Howe Press and Perkins had introduced their own drawing kit, the Raised Line Drawing Kit (RLDK).  It consisted of a rubber-faced drawing board, a nylon tipped stylus, a tracing wheel, a twelve-inch ruler, a protractor, a compass, and a right angle, along with 100 sheets of ten-inch square Mylar.  Like the Sewell Kit, the RLDK produced a raised line drawing on the opposite side of the Mylar. By 1976, Howe had also introduced their Freehand Drawing Stylus, a tool allowing you to place individual raised dots anywhere on the page. The American Printing House for the Blind got into the act originally in 1965, introducing its Swail Dot Inverter, a hand tool, designed to emboss raised dots to create simple charts, graphs, and maps.  In 1980, APH introduced its Tactile Graphics Kit, which was intended more for teachers than students, but included a variety of tools to emboss graphics of all types on heavy gauge aluminum that could then be reproduced on a conventional thermoform machine.  But the most important contribution APH made to student produced graphics would come in 2005, when[...]



Quick Tip: History in the Making

2018-04-18T12:47:42.840-04:00

History in the Making: The Story of the American Printing House for the Blind, 1858-2008 is a handsome keepsake book that describes the rich history of the American Printing House for the Blind.

width="320" height="266" class="YOUTUBE-iframe-video" data-thumbnail-src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/V23IJlbBTGw/0.jpg" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/V23IJlbBTGw?feature=player_embedded" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>






Excerpt from Cortical Visual Impairment: An Approach to Assessment and Intervention

2018-04-17T09:10:00.370-04:00

Below is an excerpt from Cortical Visual Impairment: An Approach to Assessment and Intervention(Second Edition), by Christine Roman-Lantzy.* This publication is available through AFB Press (http://www.afb.org/info/publications/afb-press/12). APH is in the process of assuming stewardship of AFB Press. This title and others will soon be available in the APH Store. Introducing Two-Dimensional Materials The suggestions presented here provide methods for including two-dimensional materials in the learning routines of students who have CVI. It is important to remember that two-dimensional materials are generally used with students who score above 6 on the CVI Range, unless the two-dimensional image is presented using a backlit system such as a tablet. Moving from three-dimensional objects, such as Slinkies, pom-poms, and balls, to two-dimensional pictures requires careful planning, so that students will be challenged at, but not beyond, their assessed level of CVI. The suggestions that follow provide a framework for this progression. They primarily address issues related to the CVI characteristic of difficulty with complexity, but they are also helpful when dealing with other characteristics, including color preference and difficulty with the visual novelty.  ·     Simple, translucent colored pictures, such as the Familiar Objects Pictures (available from the American Printing House for the Blind; see the Resources section in the online AFB Learning Center), presented on a light box can teach picture discrimination, picture recognition, and picture identification. ·     Symbols used for communication or to help students anticipate daily routines can be adapted to make them more easily viewable by children with CVI, by selecting them for such features as preferred colors, familiar items, low levels of complexity, movement and so forth. ·     Simple picture books can be created with only one picture per double-page spread. Images should be selected based on color preference, familiarity of subject, and simplicity. ·     Books that have pictures based on a theme – for example, “foods I eat,” “things I wear,” or “toys I like” – can be created or selected from books that are commercially available. Only outlined drawings should be used initially – avoid pictures with internal details as well as photographs until the student is well into Phase III (7+ to 10 on the CVI Range). ·     Commercially available books that are very simple can be selected for use with a child based on color preference and the child’s interest. ·     When photographs are presented, begin with faces, and only later present pictures of familiar people against neutral or plain backgrounds. ·     Additional photo books can be designated around particular themes of interest, for example, photos of balls or animals. ·     Keep in mind that recognition of oneself in photographs generally occurs around the same time that an individual is able to recognize him- or herself in a mirror image (generally after scoring 7 to 8 on the CVI Range). *Reproduced with permission of the American Foundation for the Blind. [...]



Scattered Crowns: Tactile Attribute Game

2018-04-16T10:17:17.703-04:00

Looking for a fun, versatile board game that encourages young children, especially those with visual impairments and blindness, to develop tactile skills? Check out Scattered Crowns!

width="320" height="266" class="YOUTUBE-iframe-video" data-thumbnail-src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/I6gc6yO6PrQ/0.jpg" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/I6gc6yO6PrQ?feature=player_embedded" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>



April has been declared CVI Literacy Awareness Month!

2018-04-13T13:45:50.948-04:00

There have been various strategies explored for learners diagnosed with CVI to help them learn to read. The APH CVI website has several pages addressing literacy, starting with the developmental need of emergent skills. Emergent skills need to be developed before children are ready for formal reading instruction. Exposing young children to books, putting foam letters in their hands, listening to letter sounds and nursery rhymes are great activities! Once a child understands that symbols/pictures have meaning, they may be ready to explore letters and words.  Another prerequisite to reading is the Learning Media Assessment. We cannot assume that we know how any child with visual impairment will best utilize reading materials unless we collect data through a learning media assessment. If a learner is determined to be tactual reader, exposure to braille materials is necessary. If a learner is determined to learn through listening, then listening skills need to be developed. If a learner is determined to be a print reader, exploration will be needed to determine how print is presented. Consideration needs to be given to the background on which letters are presented. Some children may need a solid colored background while others can discriminate the letter from a more complex background. The amount of space between letters and how many letters are presented at one time can also be determined through assessment. CVI Scotland offers a helpful blog on Fonts. They have also developed a free tool with multiple functions and settings, designed to make reading easier for people with CVI.   Look can be used for all level of readers, from a non-reader learning to read, to an experienced reader wanting specific settings to read faster and more comfortably.Look enables the user to insert any text (up to 10,000 words), and adjust the settings, to read a single word on an uncluttered screen, and either change each word manually, or set the speed for Look to present the words automatically at your comfortable reading speed.To build reading skills, there is the further option to select the number of words you wish to appear on the screen at a time, of more than one, including seeing a whole single sentence at a time. It may be that a combination of media will work best for a learner. Consistent and ongoing observation and assessments are essential to determine which materials will help the learner be successful. Once literacy needs are determined, TEACHCVI has developed a Literacy Profile, a practical tool to be used by teachers and other professionals in order to collect information about the functional vision and literacy of children with CVI.  If you have a product idea related to literacy, please submit them to APH using http://www.aph.org/products/product-ideas/#form Susan Sullivan, CVI Project Leader [...]