Subscribe: Brightsurf Science News :: Kidney Cancer News
http://www.brightsurf.com/rss.news.xml?search=Kidney_Cancer&ru
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
breast cancer  breast  cancer cells  cancer  cells  kidney  new  patients  published  researchers  risk  study  treatment 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Brightsurf Science News :: Kidney Cancer News

Kidney Cancer Current Events and Kidney Cancer News from Brightsurf



Kidney Cancer Current Events and Kidney Cancer News Events, Discoveries and Articles from Brightsurf



Copyright: Copyright 2018, Brightsurf.com
 



Herbal products may compromise prescription drugs and cause serious side effects

Wed, 24 Jan 18 00:13:50 -0800

An analysis of published studies and reports indicates that a number of herbal products may affect the properties of prescription drugs, leading to alterations in the drugs' effectiveness as well as potentially dangerous side effects.



Cancer immunotherapy found safe in patients with rheumatologic diseases

Wed, 24 Jan 18 00:13:10 -0800

In the largest single-center study of patients with rheumatologic diseases who were prescribed modern cancer immunotherapy with what are called immune checkpoint inhibitors, only a minority of patients experienced a flare of their rheumatologic disease or immune-related side effects.



Racial and ethnic disparities in live donor kidney transplants

Tue, 23 Jan 18 00:12:00 -0800

Despite efforts over the past two decades to increase the number of black and Hispanic patients receiving kidney transplants from related or unrelated living donors, these racial/ethnic minority patients are still much less likely to undergo such transplants than white patients, Johns Hopkins researchers report. In fact, the investigators say, the disparities have worsened in the last 20 years.



Cases of certain type of eyelid cancer have risen steadily over past 15 years in England

Tue, 23 Jan 18 00:09:50 -0800

New cases of a particular type of eyelid cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) have risen steadily over the past 15 years in England, reveals research published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.



Depressive symptoms linked to shorter survival in patients with head and neck cancer

Mon, 22 Jan 18 00:09:00 -0800

In a study of patients with head and neck cancer, even mild depressive symptoms were associated with poorer overall survival.



Scientists find mechanisms to avoid telomere instability found in cancer and aging cells

Mon, 22 Jan 18 00:00:20 -0800

Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found that a functional component of telomeres called TERRA has to constantly be kept in check to prevent telomeric and chromosomal instability, one of the underlying anomalies associated with cancer.



How breast cancer survivors can increase their reduced life expectancy

Mon, 22 Jan 18 00:09:20 -0800

A USC study suggests regular exercise could add to the life expectancy of breast cancer survivors because it lowers their heightened risk of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and possibly breast cancer recurrence. 'Many people don't know the No. 1 cause of death for breast cancer survivors is heart disease, not cancer,' said Christina Dieli-Conwright, lead author of a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology on Jan. 22.



Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations

Fri, 19 Jan 18 00:16:00 -0800

Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature.



Factor that doubles the risk of death from breast cancer identified

Fri, 19 Jan 18 00:00:30 -0800

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the risk of death from breast cancer is twice as high for patients with high heterogeneity of the oestrogen receptor within the same tumour as compared to patients with low heterogeneity. The study, published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, shows that the higher risk of death is independent of other known tumour markers and also holds true for Luminal A breast cancer.



Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells alive

Fri, 19 Jan 18 00:03:10 -0800

Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway'. Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, Charité scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for patients. Results from this research have been published in the journal Cell Reports*.



CancerSEEK: Generalized screening for multiple cancer types

Thu, 18 Jan 18 00:09:20 -0800

Researchers have developed a noninvasive blood test based on combined analysis of DNA and proteins that may allow earlier detection of eight common cancer types. In more than 1,000 patients, their method, dubbed CancerSEEK, detected cancer with a sensitivity of 69 to 98 percent (depending on cancer type).



Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?

Thu, 18 Jan 18 00:07:50 -0800

A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus.



Cancer gene screening more cost effective in the general population than high-risk groups

Thu, 18 Jan 18 00:10:50 -0800

A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that screening the general population for mutations in specific genes is a more cost effective way to detect people at risk and prevents more breast and ovarian cancers compared to only screening patients with a personal or family history of these diseases.



Patient-derived organoids may help personalize the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:00:40 -0800

A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) review highlights the potential of 3-D organoid models derived from patient cells to help personalize therapy for individuals with gastrointestinal cancers.



Review examines the pros and cons of surgery to reduce the risk of cancer

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:00:10 -0800

Genetic testing is commonplace for many inheritable cancer syndromes, and with that comes the knowledge of being a gene carrier for some patients. Many guidelines recommend that gene carriers take certain steps, such as surgery, to reduce their risk of developing cancer. A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) review explores the quality-of-life consequences of genetic testing and risk-reducing surgery.



Researchers discover structure of anti-aging hormone

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:02:10 -0800

A new study reveals the structure of a key protein, and how it helps to transmit a hormonal signal that slows aging.



Dulling cancer therapy's double-edged sword

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:08:50 -0800

Researchers have discovered a very promising new pathway to preventing tumor recurrence -- 'resolvins' could be used in complement with chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapies to stave off the tumor-promoting effects of dead cancer cell debris.



Patients with blood cancer precursor at risk of developing cancer even after 30 years

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:09:30 -0800

Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are at risk of progressing to multiple myeloma or a related cancer -- even after 30 years of stability. These are the findings of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Wednesday, Jan. 17, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.



New study validates clotting risk factors in chronic kidney disease

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:09:00 -0800

In late 2017, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine discovered and published a potential treatment target to prevent chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients from developing thrombosis (blood clots) without causing bleeding complications. They found that boosting a regulatory protein named STUB1 decreased the abundance of tissue factor (TF) and prevented blood vessel blockages in experimental models. Now, these same researchers have tested other aspect of this hypothesis in humans with promising results.



New drug combination helps kickstart the immune system to fight back against cancer

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:10:50 -0800

Scientists from King's College London have found a way to boost the immune system to help it fight back against cancer. The breakthrough involves the first ever use of a combination of chemotherapy and a drug being trialed as a treatment for neonatal jaundice, that together help kick start the body's natural defenses.



Math can predict how cancer cells evolve

Tue, 16 Jan 18 00:02:10 -0800

Applied mathematics can be a powerful tool in helping predict the genesis and evolution of different types of cancers, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.



Oral health may have an important role in cancer prevention

Tue, 16 Jan 18 00:12:30 -0800

The bacteria that cause periodontitis, a disease affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth, seems to play a part also in the onset of pancreatic cancer.



Cleveland Clinic researchers find new gene variant linked to deadly prostate cancer

Tue, 16 Jan 18 00:02:40 -0800

Cleveland Clinic researchers have confirmed for the first time a mechanistic link between the gene HSD17B4 and deadly, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. The research, led by Nima Sharifi, M.D., Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, shows that men who lack a certain subtype of the gene may be more susceptible to aggressive prostate cancer that does not respond to treatment.



NHS bowel scope uptake boosted by a fifth when patients sent reassuring reminders

Sun, 14 Jan 18 00:12:00 -0800

Bowel scope screening increased by more than a fifth (21.5 percent) when people were sent additional reminders with a leaflet that addressed common concerns, according to a new study funded by Cancer Research UK.



New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate

Fri, 12 Jan 18 00:07:30 -0800

BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in agriculture using a significantly broader data base.



Scientists identify genes implicated in the high regenerative capacity of embryos and ESCs

Fri, 12 Jan 18 00:11:30 -0800

Researchers at Insilico Medicine , AgeX Therapeutics and the Biogerontology Research Foundation have published a landmark study titled 'Use of deep neural network ensembles to identify embryonic-fetal transition markers: repression of COX7A1 in embryonic and cancer cells' in the journal Oncotarget.



New biomarkers for colorectal cancer

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:04:30 -0800

Researchers from the University of Luxembourg found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the disease stage, and determine a patient's risk for recurrence of the disease. This supports the doctor in choosing the best-fitting treatment plan.



Education and income determine whether women participate in cervical screening

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:05:30 -0800

The impression that foreign-born women in Sweden more often are excluded from gynecological cancer screening needs to be reconsidered. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy, published in the journal PLOS One, makes it clear that foreign-born women participate to the same extent as women born in Sweden with a corresponding educational level and income.



New AI technology significantly improves human kidney analysis

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:06:50 -0800

The ability to quantify the extent of kidney damage and predict the life remaining in the kidney, using an image obtained at the time when a patient visits the hospital for a kidney biopsy, now is possible using a computer model based on artificial intelligence (AI).



Researchers demonstrate RAS dimers are essential for cancer

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:13:40 -0800

Researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center have shown that RAS molecules act in pairs, known as dimers, to cause cancer, findings that could help guide them to a treatment.



Experts call for action to address physician burnout in nephrology

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:01:50 -0800

Kidney specialists face increasing work demands, high rates of burnout, and declining interest in nephrology as a career. A group of articles publishing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) sheds light on how that these factors threaten to reduce job satisfaction and impair the delivery of high-quality care to patients with kidney diseases.



MDI Biological Laboratory discovery could lead to new therapies for diabetics

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:04:30 -0800

New research by MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy could potentially be used to treat peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes as well.



Certain factors may predict lung cancer patients' response to chemotherapy

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:14:20 -0800

In a retrospective analysis of 73 lung squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with the chemotherapy regimen of gemcitabine plus cisplatin, higher body mass index and younger age were linked with longer progression-free survival, the length of time that a patient lives with cancer but it does not get worse. Patients with better response to treatment and higher body mass index had longer overall survival in the Thoracic Cancer analysis.



New research improves our understanding of cancer cell regulation

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:05:10 -0800

New research measures how changes in kinase activity can influence the growth, development and regulation of cancer cells. They measure kinase network rewiring that occurs in cancer patients so that they can identify new strategies for killing cancer cells.



Biomarkers may help predict outcomes in gastric cancer patients who abuse alcohol

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:06:10 -0800

Alcohol consumption has been identified as a modifiable risk factor for cancers such as gastric cancer. A new report in the the American Journal of Pathology sheds light on how specific proteins interact with alcohol, and how that interplay impacts survival and response to platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer who may or may not still be drinking.



With these special bacteria, a broccoli a day can keep the cancer doctor away

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:08:50 -0800

NUS Medicine researchers have engineered bacteria that specifically targets colorectal cancer cells and converts a substance in some vegetables into an anticancer agent. The system reduced the number of tumors by 75 percent and shrank the remaining tumors by threefold in a mouse model of colorectal cancer. Published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the study suggests that the probiotics taken together with a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables could help prevent colorectal cancer and its recurrence.



Salk scientists curb growth of cancer cells by blocking access to key nutrients

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:10:40 -0800

Salk researchers have discovered how to curb the growth of cancer cells by blocking the cells' access to certain nutrients.



New prostate cancer risk score could help guide screening decisions

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:01:10 -0800

A new score for predicting a man's genetic risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer could help guide decisions about who to screen and when, say researchers in The BMJ today.



Targeting breast cancer through precision medicine

Tue, 09 Jan 18 00:05:20 -0800

University of Alberta researchers have discovered a mechanism that may make cancer cells more susceptible to treatment. The research team found that the protein RYBP prevents DNA repair in cancer cells, including breast cancer.



UC researchers find protein that mediates formation of HER2-driven breast cancer

Tue, 09 Jan 18 00:09:10 -0800

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have identified for the first time that the estrogen receptor-binding protein MED1 is a critical mediator of HER2-driven breast cancer, identifying it as a potential therapeutic target.



Study uncovers healthcare disparities among octogenarians and nonagenarians with advanced lung cancer

Mon, 08 Jan 18 00:03:40 -0800

A new study reveals that, among patients of advanced age with stage III lung cancer, African Americans and individuals who live in lower income areas are more likely to not receive any treatment.



Landmark genetic study better predicts stomach cancer

Fri, 05 Jan 18 00:08:30 -0800

Although stomach cancer is treatable if detected early, diagnosis often occurs at an advanced stage, resulting in high mortality. A new study by researchers at the National University Health System and Duke-NUS Medical School has identified genetic patterns in intestinal metaplasia (a precondition for stomach cancer) which help predict the development of this life-threatening cancer. The discovery could enable targeted screening and earlier detection of stomach cancer, leading to better patient outcomes.



Don't give up now -- keeping your New Year's resolutions could reduce cancer risk

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:11:00 -0800

Research published this week in ecancermedicalscience may provide the motivation needed to stick with your New Year's resolutions for healthy living. Researchers led by Professor Peter Elwood of Cardiff University, UK examined preliminary data from the UK Biobank, a prospective study of half a million subjects. They found that healthy choices may lead to a total reduction of about one-third in cancer risk.



Cancer mortality in the US continues decades-long drop

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:11:50 -0800

The cancer death rate dropped 1.7 percent from 2014 to 2015, continuing a drop that began in 1991 and has reached 26 percent, resulting in nearly 2.4 million fewer cancer deaths during that time.



A new therapeutic target to fight metastasis in ovarian cancer

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:13:00 -0800

Researchers of IDIBELL - ICO have described a key cellular receptor in the processes of metastasis in ovarian cancer. The finding might lead to the use of inhibitors of this receptor as a therapeutic target in the most aggressive variants of the disease.



Breast size dissatisfaction affects self-examination

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:14:40 -0800

New research shows that women who are dissatisfied with the size of their breasts are less likely to carry out regular self-examinations to screen for breast cancer.



Mechanism for resistance to immunotherapy treatment discovered

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:03:10 -0800

Two research groups from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have independently discovered a genetic mechanism in cancer cells that influences whether they resist or respond to immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors. The scientists say the findings reveal potential new drug targets and might aid efforts to extend the benefits of immunotherapy treatment to more patients and additional types of cancer.



Racial, ethnic disparities persist for patients in receiving kidney transplants from live donors

Tue, 02 Jan 18 00:06:50 -0800

Black and Hispanic patients are less likely than white patients to receive a live donor kidney after two years on a waiting list, with an increase in disparity over the last two decades.



Zooming in on protein to prevent kidney stones

Tue, 02 Jan 18 00:08:20 -0800

Researchers have applied Nobel prize-winning microscope technology to uncover an ion channel structure that could lead to new treatments for kidney stones. In a recent study published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, researchers revealed atomic-level details of the protein that serves as a passageway for calcium across kidney cell membranes.



State-of-the-art MRI technology bypasses need for biopsy

Tue, 02 Jan 18 00:12:50 -0800

The most common type of tumor found in the kidney is generally quite small (less than 1.5 in). These tumors are usually found by accident when CAT scans are performed for other reasons and the serendipitous finding poses a problem for doctors.