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Preview: Brightsurf Science News :: Neck Cancer News

Neck Cancer Current Events and Neck Cancer News from Brightsurf



Neck Cancer Current Events and Neck Cancer News Events, Discoveries and Articles from Brightsurf



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Skin cancers linked with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:02:50 -0700

Previous studies have demonstrated a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in individuals with various cancers, including non-melanoma skin cancers (including squamous cell cancers and basal cell cancers).



Study examines sperm production in men with testicular cancer

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:05:20 -0700

In a study of men with testicular cancer, increasing tumor size relative to testis size was linked with a reduced ability to produce sperm.



Bedside art therapy decreases pain and anxiety in patients with cancer

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:05:10 -0700

A brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improved mood and reduced pain and anxiety in a study of inpatients with hematological cancers.



GLUT5 fluorescent probe fingerprints cancer cells

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:10:00 -0700

Getting the results of a cancer biopsy can take up to two weeks. What if it could happen in 10 minutes? In two new papers, a team of chemists and engineers from Michigan Technological University lay the groundwork for cancer detection and diagnostics based on a fluorescent GLUT5 probe. Documented in the new research, a cancer's type and malignancy changes the GLUT5 activity in a cell, creating a detectable 'fingerprint' of cancer.



Landmark study links tumor evolution to prostate cancer severity

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:12:40 -0700

Findings from Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) researchers and their collaborators, published today in Cell, show that the aggressiveness of an individual prostate cancer can be accurately assessed by looking at how that tumor has evolved. This information can be used to determine what type and how much treatment should be given to each patient, or if any is needed at all.



Improved method of delivering anti-cancer drugs

Wed, 18 Apr 18 00:16:20 -0700

A new non-toxic method for delivering anti-cancer drugs to specific parts of the human body could mean the end of the severe and nasty side effects associated with many cancer therapies, according to researchers at Cardiff University's School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.



Researchers identified a protein associated with breast cancer

Wed, 18 Apr 18 00:12:20 -0700

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a protein that is strongly associated with metastatic breast cancer and that could be a target for future therapies.



Diagnosing, treating neuropathy symptoms in cancer patients not exact science

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:07:10 -0700

Most of the roughly 15.5 million cancer survivors in the US receive chemotherapy, and roughly 65 percent develop some degree of the chemotherapy-induced nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy.



Scientists find some human cancers to be 'evolutionary accidents'

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:11:40 -0700

New research, published in Biological Reviews and conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool and Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde (Brasília, Brazil) has found some type of cancers unique to humans may be a result of evolutionary accidents.



A new, streamlined approach to diagnosing and treating bowel cancer

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:13:50 -0700

Researchers at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and the University of Adelaide have discovered a faster, more cost-effective way to determine which DNA mutations cause human bowel cancer.



Study reports possible novel method for stopping untreatable pediatric brain cancers

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:12:40 -0700

Researchers used an experimental molecular therapy in preclinical laboratory tests to effectively treat several types of deadly pediatric brain cancer and now propose advancing the treatment to clinical testing in children. Scientists report in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics testing the small molecule 6-thio-2'deoxyguanosine (6-thio-dG) in brain cancer stem cells derived from tumor cells donated by patients. Researchers also tested the treatment in humanized mouse models of pediatric brain cancer.



FDA approves new standard of care for kidney cancer

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:01:40 -0700

The US Food and Drug Administration granted approval to the combination of two immunotherapy drugs, ipilimumab and nivolumab, for the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer.



Global ROS1 initiative: A patient-researcher collaboration targeting ROS1 cancer

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:04:20 -0700

CU presentation at AACR2018 describes the first research-focused group of patients organized around the genetic mutation that creates their cancer, namely changes to the gene ROS1.



For aggressive breast cancer in the brain, researchers clarify immune response

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:04:50 -0700

In a preliminary study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2018 in Chicago, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center revealed findings for what kind of immune response the body is staging against triple negative breast cancer that has spread to the brain. They hope they can use these findings to improve patient responses to drugs that work by unleashing the immune system against cancer.



Abramson Cancer Canter studies show promise of immunotherapy combinations, including CAR T

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:06:40 -0700

As immunotherapies continue to make up a larger share of new cancer drugs, researchers are looking for the most effective ways to use these cutting edge treatments in combination with each or with other pre-existing options. New studies from the Abramson Cancer Center are providing clues on potentially effective combinations with CAR T therapy in brain cancer as well as a novel therapeutic target in head and neck cancer, and also providing greater understanding of the mechanisms of resistance in pancreatic cancer.



Randomized clinical trial examines therapies for chronic spinal pain

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:10:30 -0700

In a randomized clinical trial of patients with chronic spinal pain, a program that combined education to help patients think differently about pain with an exercise program that increasingly introduced movements patients feared or avoided (pain neuroscience education plus cognition-targeted motor control training) appeared better than usual care (combining education on back and neck pain and general exercise therapy) at reducing pain and improving function and thoughts of pain.



Beyond PD-L1: Taking away TIM3 and Tregs stops cancer regrowth after immunotherapy

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:15:00 -0700

CU Cancer Center study presented at AACR18 shows that TIM3 and/or increased regulatory T cells (Tregs) within a tumor may help cancers inactivate immune system killer T cells that would otherwise identify and attack the cancer.



When prostate cancer reaches bone, bone cells may drive overall growth of the disease

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:14:50 -0700

When prostate cancer metastasizes to bone, it can become especially dangerous. A CU study at AACR18 hints at why: cells involved in these bone metastases may release signals that drive the progression of the disease.



Study examines accuracy of test for lymph node metastases in women with breast cancer

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:15:30 -0700

A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that axillary ultrasound imaging is inferior for detecting axillary node metastasis in patients with breast cancer.



Three-fold higher risk of cancer after acute thrombosis in the leg

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:16:20 -0700

The risk of developing cancer is more than three times higher during the first six months following blood clot in the leg, compared with the background population. This is shown by a register-based study that medical doctor and Ph.D. Jens Sundbøll has recently published in the journal Circulation. Jens Sundbøll is employed at the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, which is part of the Department of Clinical Medicine at Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital.



Ear infections can lead to meningitis, brain abscess and other neurological complications

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:01:30 -0700

While antibiotics have greatly reduced the dangers of ear infections, serious neurological complications, including hearing loss, facial paralysis, meningitis and brain abscess still occur, according to a report in the journal Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.



Is whole-brain radiation still best for brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer?

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:02:40 -0700

University of Colorado Cancer Center study compares outcomes of 5,752 small-cell lung cancer patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) with those of 200 patients who received stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), finding that the median overall survival was actually longer with SRS (10.8 months with SRS versus 7.1 months with WBRT).



Man-made antibodies show promise in attacking cancer cells in animal models

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:04:30 -0700

Using chemotherapy along with aptamers -- lab-made molecules that function like antibodies -- Duke Health researchers showed that they can zero in on and kill prostate cancer tumors in mice while leaving healthy tissue unscathed.



New liquid biopsy-based cancer model reveals data on deadly lung cancer

Sun, 15 Apr 18 00:16:10 -0700

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 14 percent of all lung cancers and is often rapidly resistant to chemotherapy resulting in poor clinical outcomes. Treatment has changed little for decades, but a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center offers a potential explanation for why the disease becomes chemoresistant, and a possible avenue to explore new diagnostic approaches.



First-in-human clinical trial of new targeted therapy drug reports promising responses for multiple

Sun, 15 Apr 18 00:16:20 -0700

A phase I, first-in-human study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reveals for the first time, an investigational drug that is effective and safe for patients with cancers caused by an alteration in the receptor tyrosine kinase known as RET. The drug appears to be promising as a potential therapy for RET-driven cancers, such as medullary and papillary thyroid, non-small cell lung, colorectal and bile duct cancers, which have been historically difficult to treat.



A novel precision cancer model opens doors to personalized cancer treatment

Fri, 13 Apr 18 00:05:50 -0700

Researchers from the Seve Ballesteros Foundation-CNIO Brain Tumour Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have developed an extremely powerful and versatile mouse model that will improve cancer research and accelerate preclinical testing of novel targeted therapies. Their work appears in Nature Communications.



To starve pancreatic tumors, researchers seek to block 'self-eating,' other fuel sources

Fri, 13 Apr 18 00:15:00 -0700

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and their collaborators are reporting preclinical findings for a potential two-treatment strategy to block multiple mechanisms of cancer cell metabolism in pancreatic cancer at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in Chicago. The findings will be presented from 8 a.m. to noon on Wednesday.



Nutrition, physical activity guidelines and survival after colon cancer diagnosis

Thu, 12 Apr 18 00:10:30 -0700

A lifestyle consistent with the American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines to maintain a healthy weight, engage in regular physical activity, and eat a diet rich in nutritious foods was associated with a lower risk of death in patients with colon cancer.



Study explores carbohydrates' impact on head, neck cancers

Thu, 12 Apr 18 00:11:30 -0700

Consuming high amounts of carbohydrates and various forms of sugar during the year prior to treatment for head and neck cancer may increase patients' risks of cancer recurrence and mortality, a new study reports. However, eating moderate amounts of fats and starchy foods such as whole grains, potatoes and legumes after treatment could have protective benefits, reducing patients' risks of disease recurrence and death, said lead author Anna E. Arthur, a professor of food science and human nutrition at the University of Illinois.



Inhibiting metabolism found to be effective in treating aggressive form of lung cancer

Thu, 12 Apr 18 00:00:00 -0700

Researchers from UCLA and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center have found that two targeted therapies could be more effective if used in combination to treat squamous cell carcinomas of the lung



An unexpected discovery in a central line

Thu, 12 Apr 18 00:04:40 -0700

An otherwise healthy 6-year-old had a central line that tested positive for a type of fungal infection that typically strikes adults with compromised immune systems.



Training the immune system to fight ovarian cancer

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:13:00 -0700

A personalized cancer vaccine safely and successfully boosted immune responses and increased survival rates in patients with ovarian cancer, according to results from a pilot clinical trial.



Ludwig scientists share new cancer research findings at 2018 AACR Annual Meeting

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:15:00 -0700

Ludwig Cancer Research released today the full scope of findings to be presented by Ludwig researchers at this year's American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill., April 14-18, 2018. Research conducted by more than 100 Ludwig scientists will be presented in symposiums, plenaries, town meetings, education sessions and poster sessions.



UTSA researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections

Tue, 10 Apr 18 00:14:30 -0700

A new study by Althea Campuzano, Ph.D., a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Floyd Wormley, Jr., Professor of Biology and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer.



Early 'chemobrain' intervention needed for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy
More support is needed to help breast cancer patients and survivors manage 'chemobrain' symptoms, such as memory loss, short attention span and mental confusion, according to a study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore.