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Preview: Brightsurf Science News :: Eye Cancer News

Eye Cancer Current Events and Eye Cancer News from Brightsurf



Eye Cancer Current Events and Eye Cancer News Events, Discoveries and Articles from Brightsurf



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Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations

Fri, 19 Jan 18 00:16:00 -0800

Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature.



Factor that doubles the risk of death from breast cancer identified

Fri, 19 Jan 18 00:00:30 -0800

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the risk of death from breast cancer is twice as high for patients with high heterogeneity of the oestrogen receptor within the same tumour as compared to patients with low heterogeneity. The study, published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, shows that the higher risk of death is independent of other known tumour markers and also holds true for Luminal A breast cancer.



Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells alive

Fri, 19 Jan 18 00:03:10 -0800

Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway'. Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, Charité scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for patients. Results from this research have been published in the journal Cell Reports*.



Length of opioid prescription spell highest risk for misuse after surgery

Fri, 19 Jan 18 00:06:20 -0800

With opioid overdoses now a leading cause of nonintentional death in the United States, data show most of these deaths can be traced back to an initial prescription opioid. A new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) sheds light on the possible link between physicians' opioid prescription patterns and subsequent abuse.



New instrument lets doctors view the entire eye with unprecedented level of detail

Thu, 18 Jan 18 00:15:10 -0800

Researchers have developed the first instrument that can provide a detailed image of the entire eye that can produce higher quality images than currently available.



Using Hawkeye from the Avengers to communicate on the eye

Thu, 18 Jan 18 00:05:40 -0800

Superheroes can be used to communicate learning objectives to students in an interesting, fun, and accessible manner. Hawkeye, a member of the Avengers, is one such superhero, as Barry Fitzgerald of Delft University of Technology (TU Delft, The Netherlands) argues in the article 'Using Hawkeye from the Avengers to communicate on the eye', published in the journal Advances in Physiology Education.



CancerSEEK: Generalized screening for multiple cancer types

Thu, 18 Jan 18 00:09:20 -0800

Researchers have developed a noninvasive blood test based on combined analysis of DNA and proteins that may allow earlier detection of eight common cancer types. In more than 1,000 patients, their method, dubbed CancerSEEK, detected cancer with a sensitivity of 69 to 98 percent (depending on cancer type).



Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?

Thu, 18 Jan 18 00:07:50 -0800

A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus.



Cancer gene screening more cost effective in the general population than high-risk groups

Thu, 18 Jan 18 00:10:50 -0800

A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that screening the general population for mutations in specific genes is a more cost effective way to detect people at risk and prevents more breast and ovarian cancers compared to only screening patients with a personal or family history of these diseases.



Patient-derived organoids may help personalize the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:00:40 -0800

A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) review highlights the potential of 3-D organoid models derived from patient cells to help personalize therapy for individuals with gastrointestinal cancers.



Review examines the pros and cons of surgery to reduce the risk of cancer

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:00:10 -0800

Genetic testing is commonplace for many inheritable cancer syndromes, and with that comes the knowledge of being a gene carrier for some patients. Many guidelines recommend that gene carriers take certain steps, such as surgery, to reduce their risk of developing cancer. A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) review explores the quality-of-life consequences of genetic testing and risk-reducing surgery.



Dulling cancer therapy's double-edged sword

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:08:50 -0800

Researchers have discovered a very promising new pathway to preventing tumor recurrence -- 'resolvins' could be used in complement with chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapies to stave off the tumor-promoting effects of dead cancer cell debris.



Patients with blood cancer precursor at risk of developing cancer even after 30 years

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:09:30 -0800

Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are at risk of progressing to multiple myeloma or a related cancer -- even after 30 years of stability. These are the findings of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Wednesday, Jan. 17, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.



New drug combination helps kickstart the immune system to fight back against cancer

Wed, 17 Jan 18 00:10:50 -0800

Scientists from King's College London have found a way to boost the immune system to help it fight back against cancer. The breakthrough involves the first ever use of a combination of chemotherapy and a drug being trialed as a treatment for neonatal jaundice, that together help kick start the body's natural defenses.



Math can predict how cancer cells evolve

Tue, 16 Jan 18 00:02:10 -0800

Applied mathematics can be a powerful tool in helping predict the genesis and evolution of different types of cancers, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.



Oral health may have an important role in cancer prevention

Tue, 16 Jan 18 00:12:30 -0800

The bacteria that cause periodontitis, a disease affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth, seems to play a part also in the onset of pancreatic cancer.



NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Berguitta heading toward Mauritius

Tue, 16 Jan 18 00:01:00 -0800

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and saw Tropical Cyclone Berguitta moving southwest toward the island of Mauritius. A tropical cyclone alert class 2 is in effect for Mauritius.



Cleveland Clinic researchers find new gene variant linked to deadly prostate cancer

Tue, 16 Jan 18 00:02:40 -0800

Cleveland Clinic researchers have confirmed for the first time a mechanistic link between the gene HSD17B4 and deadly, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. The research, led by Nima Sharifi, M.D., Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, shows that men who lack a certain subtype of the gene may be more susceptible to aggressive prostate cancer that does not respond to treatment.



Study advances gene therapy for glaucoma

Tue, 16 Jan 18 00:05:20 -0800

In a study published today in the scientific journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kaufman and Curtis Brandt, a fellow professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at UW-Madison, showed an improved tactic for delivering new genes into the eye's fluid drain, called the trabecular meshwork. It could lead to a treatment for glaucoma.



NHS bowel scope uptake boosted by a fifth when patients sent reassuring reminders

Sun, 14 Jan 18 00:12:00 -0800

Bowel scope screening increased by more than a fifth (21.5 percent) when people were sent additional reminders with a leaflet that addressed common concerns, according to a new study funded by Cancer Research UK.



New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate

Fri, 12 Jan 18 00:07:30 -0800

BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in agriculture using a significantly broader data base.



New biomarkers for colorectal cancer

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:04:30 -0800

Researchers from the University of Luxembourg found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the disease stage, and determine a patient's risk for recurrence of the disease. This supports the doctor in choosing the best-fitting treatment plan.



Education and income determine whether women participate in cervical screening

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:05:30 -0800

The impression that foreign-born women in Sweden more often are excluded from gynecological cancer screening needs to be reconsidered. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy, published in the journal PLOS One, makes it clear that foreign-born women participate to the same extent as women born in Sweden with a corresponding educational level and income.



Researchers demonstrate RAS dimers are essential for cancer

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:13:40 -0800

Researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center have shown that RAS molecules act in pairs, known as dimers, to cause cancer, findings that could help guide them to a treatment.



UC biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyes

Thu, 11 Jan 18 00:00:20 -0800

Biologists at UC look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyes to find potential for research into human visual challenges.



Certain factors may predict lung cancer patients' response to chemotherapy

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:14:20 -0800

In a retrospective analysis of 73 lung squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with the chemotherapy regimen of gemcitabine plus cisplatin, higher body mass index and younger age were linked with longer progression-free survival, the length of time that a patient lives with cancer but it does not get worse. Patients with better response to treatment and higher body mass index had longer overall survival in the Thoracic Cancer analysis.



New research improves our understanding of cancer cell regulation

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:05:10 -0800

New research measures how changes in kinase activity can influence the growth, development and regulation of cancer cells. They measure kinase network rewiring that occurs in cancer patients so that they can identify new strategies for killing cancer cells.



New discovery may explain winter weight gain

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:06:30 -0800

We may have a new reason, in addition to vitamin D generation, to bask in a little sunshine. A breakthrough study by UAlberta researchers has shown the fat cells that lie just beneath our skin shrink when exposed to the blue light emitted by the sun.



Biomarkers may help predict outcomes in gastric cancer patients who abuse alcohol

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:06:10 -0800

Alcohol consumption has been identified as a modifiable risk factor for cancers such as gastric cancer. A new report in the the American Journal of Pathology sheds light on how specific proteins interact with alcohol, and how that interplay impacts survival and response to platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer who may or may not still be drinking.



With these special bacteria, a broccoli a day can keep the cancer doctor away

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:08:50 -0800

NUS Medicine researchers have engineered bacteria that specifically targets colorectal cancer cells and converts a substance in some vegetables into an anticancer agent. The system reduced the number of tumors by 75 percent and shrank the remaining tumors by threefold in a mouse model of colorectal cancer. Published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the study suggests that the probiotics taken together with a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables could help prevent colorectal cancer and its recurrence.



Salk scientists curb growth of cancer cells by blocking access to key nutrients

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:10:40 -0800

Salk researchers have discovered how to curb the growth of cancer cells by blocking the cells' access to certain nutrients.



New prostate cancer risk score could help guide screening decisions

Wed, 10 Jan 18 00:01:10 -0800

A new score for predicting a man's genetic risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer could help guide decisions about who to screen and when, say researchers in The BMJ today.



Targeting breast cancer through precision medicine

Tue, 09 Jan 18 00:05:20 -0800

University of Alberta researchers have discovered a mechanism that may make cancer cells more susceptible to treatment. The research team found that the protein RYBP prevents DNA repair in cancer cells, including breast cancer.



Deep sea creatures provide a guiding light in the quest to develop cancer therapies

Tue, 09 Jan 18 00:07:00 -0800

Scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of USC use enzymes responsible for marine animal bioluminescence to help researchers test whether cancer immunotherapies work.



UC researchers find protein that mediates formation of HER2-driven breast cancer

Tue, 09 Jan 18 00:09:10 -0800

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have identified for the first time that the estrogen receptor-binding protein MED1 is a critical mediator of HER2-driven breast cancer, identifying it as a potential therapeutic target.



New study finds large increase in non-powder gun-related eye injuries

Mon, 08 Jan 18 00:16:00 -0800

A study investigated sports- and recreation-related eye injuries during a 23-year period and found a slight decrease in eye injuries overall; however, the rate of eye injury associated with non-powder guns (including BB, pellet and paintball guns) increased by almost 170 percent.



Study uncovers healthcare disparities among octogenarians and nonagenarians with advanced lung cancer

Mon, 08 Jan 18 00:03:40 -0800

A new study reveals that, among patients of advanced age with stage III lung cancer, African Americans and individuals who live in lower income areas are more likely to not receive any treatment.



Powerful tropical cyclone irving examined with GPM

Mon, 08 Jan 18 00:10:20 -0800

On Jan. 8, Tropical Cyclone Irving was hurricane-force in the Southern Indian Ocean. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and measured cloud heights and rainfall rates in the powerful storm.



Landmark genetic study better predicts stomach cancer

Fri, 05 Jan 18 00:08:30 -0800

Although stomach cancer is treatable if detected early, diagnosis often occurs at an advanced stage, resulting in high mortality. A new study by researchers at the National University Health System and Duke-NUS Medical School has identified genetic patterns in intestinal metaplasia (a precondition for stomach cancer) which help predict the development of this life-threatening cancer. The discovery could enable targeted screening and earlier detection of stomach cancer, leading to better patient outcomes.



NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Ava's landfall on Madagascar's coast

Fri, 05 Jan 18 00:14:50 -0800

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ava as it made landfall along the coast of northeastern Madagascar.



Don't give up now -- keeping your New Year's resolutions could reduce cancer risk

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:11:00 -0800

Research published this week in ecancermedicalscience may provide the motivation needed to stick with your New Year's resolutions for healthy living. Researchers led by Professor Peter Elwood of Cardiff University, UK examined preliminary data from the UK Biobank, a prospective study of half a million subjects. They found that healthy choices may lead to a total reduction of about one-third in cancer risk.



Cancer mortality in the US continues decades-long drop

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:11:50 -0800

The cancer death rate dropped 1.7 percent from 2014 to 2015, continuing a drop that began in 1991 and has reached 26 percent, resulting in nearly 2.4 million fewer cancer deaths during that time.



A new therapeutic target to fight metastasis in ovarian cancer

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:13:00 -0800

Researchers of IDIBELL - ICO have described a key cellular receptor in the processes of metastasis in ovarian cancer. The finding might lead to the use of inhibitors of this receptor as a therapeutic target in the most aggressive variants of the disease.



Breast size dissatisfaction affects self-examination

Thu, 04 Jan 18 00:14:40 -0800

New research shows that women who are dissatisfied with the size of their breasts are less likely to carry out regular self-examinations to screen for breast cancer.



Pong paddles and perception: Our actions influence what we see

Wed, 03 Jan 18 00:16:00 -0800

Most people think of vision as simply a function of information the eye gathers. For cognitive psychologist Jessica Witt, vision is a little more complicated than that. She has a new paper that faces head-on the notion that her experimental subjects have been victims of a psychological phenomenon called response bias. She employed a classic, action-specific experiment involving a video game familiar to children of the 80s: Pong.



Virus could treat brain tumours by boosting immune system

Wed, 03 Jan 18 00:07:10 -0800

Virus could act as an immunotherapy when injected into bloodstream. First human trial shows virus can cross blood-brain barrier to infect tumors and stimulate the body's immune system to attack the cancer.



Malcolm Gladwell published in the Journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

Wed, 03 Jan 18 00:07:40 -0800

In his best sellers 'The Tipping Point,' 'Blink' and 'Outliers,' Malcolm Gladwell writes about the unexpected implications of scientific research, urging readers to think different. In an editorial published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Gladwell offers another example of his stock in trade: to make medical students better doctors, send them to art school.



Immune cells play key role in early breast cancer metastasis even before a tumor develops

Tue, 02 Jan 18 00:03:40 -0800

Mount Sinai researchers have discovered that normal immune cells called macrophages, which reside in healthy breast tissue surrounding milk ducts, play a major role in helping early breast cancer cells leave the breast for other parts of the body, potentially creating metastasis before a tumor has even developed, according to a study published in Nature Communications.



NIH discovery brings stem cell therapy for eye disease closer to the clinic

Tue, 02 Jan 18 00:09:30 -0800

Scientists at the National Eye Institute report that tiny tube-like protrusions called primary cilia on cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) -- a layer of cells in the back of the eye -- are essential for the survival of the retina's light-sensing photoreceptors. The discovery has advanced efforts to make stem cell-derived RPE for transplantation into patients with geographic atrophy, otherwise known as dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the US.



Restasis: Why US consumers paid billions for drug deemed ineffective in other countries

Tue, 02 Jan 18 00:08:40 -0800

Restasis, a blockbuster drug sold by Allergan to treat chronic dry eye, has done $8.8 billion in U.S. sales between 2009 and 2015, including over $2.9 billion in public monies through Medicare Part D. In an article in JAMA IM,