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Preview: Brightsurf Science News :: Eye Cancer News

Eye Cancer Current Events and Eye Cancer News from Brightsurf



Eye Cancer Current Events and Eye Cancer News Events, Discoveries and Articles from Brightsurf



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Skin cancers linked with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:02:50 -0700

Previous studies have demonstrated a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in individuals with various cancers, including non-melanoma skin cancers (including squamous cell cancers and basal cell cancers).



Study examines sperm production in men with testicular cancer

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:05:20 -0700

In a study of men with testicular cancer, increasing tumor size relative to testis size was linked with a reduced ability to produce sperm.



Bedside art therapy decreases pain and anxiety in patients with cancer

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:05:10 -0700

A brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improved mood and reduced pain and anxiety in a study of inpatients with hematological cancers.



GLUT5 fluorescent probe fingerprints cancer cells

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:10:00 -0700

Getting the results of a cancer biopsy can take up to two weeks. What if it could happen in 10 minutes? In two new papers, a team of chemists and engineers from Michigan Technological University lay the groundwork for cancer detection and diagnostics based on a fluorescent GLUT5 probe. Documented in the new research, a cancer's type and malignancy changes the GLUT5 activity in a cell, creating a detectable 'fingerprint' of cancer.



Landmark study links tumor evolution to prostate cancer severity

Thu, 19 Apr 18 00:12:40 -0700

Findings from Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) researchers and their collaborators, published today in Cell, show that the aggressiveness of an individual prostate cancer can be accurately assessed by looking at how that tumor has evolved. This information can be used to determine what type and how much treatment should be given to each patient, or if any is needed at all.



Improved method of delivering anti-cancer drugs

Wed, 18 Apr 18 00:16:20 -0700

A new non-toxic method for delivering anti-cancer drugs to specific parts of the human body could mean the end of the severe and nasty side effects associated with many cancer therapies, according to researchers at Cardiff University's School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.



An artificial mole as an early warning system

Wed, 18 Apr 18 00:10:40 -0700

ETH researchers working with Martin Fussenegger have developed an early warning system for the four most common types of cancer. Should a tumor develop, a visible mole will appear on the skin.



Researchers identified a protein associated with breast cancer

Wed, 18 Apr 18 00:12:20 -0700

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a protein that is strongly associated with metastatic breast cancer and that could be a target for future therapies.



An eye toward regeneration

Wed, 18 Apr 18 00:01:20 -0700

UNLV scientist Kelly Tseng, Ph.D. and her team have found that frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injuries, a breakthrough that may lead one day to the ability to orchestrate tissue regeneration in humans.



Diagnosing, treating neuropathy symptoms in cancer patients not exact science

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:07:10 -0700

Most of the roughly 15.5 million cancer survivors in the US receive chemotherapy, and roughly 65 percent develop some degree of the chemotherapy-induced nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy.



Scientists find some human cancers to be 'evolutionary accidents'

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:11:40 -0700

New research, published in Biological Reviews and conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool and Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde (Brasília, Brazil) has found some type of cancers unique to humans may be a result of evolutionary accidents.



A new, streamlined approach to diagnosing and treating bowel cancer

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:13:50 -0700

Researchers at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and the University of Adelaide have discovered a faster, more cost-effective way to determine which DNA mutations cause human bowel cancer.



Study reports possible novel method for stopping untreatable pediatric brain cancers

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:12:40 -0700

Researchers used an experimental molecular therapy in preclinical laboratory tests to effectively treat several types of deadly pediatric brain cancer and now propose advancing the treatment to clinical testing in children. Scientists report in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics testing the small molecule 6-thio-2'deoxyguanosine (6-thio-dG) in brain cancer stem cells derived from tumor cells donated by patients. Researchers also tested the treatment in humanized mouse models of pediatric brain cancer.



FDA approves new standard of care for kidney cancer

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:01:40 -0700

The US Food and Drug Administration granted approval to the combination of two immunotherapy drugs, ipilimumab and nivolumab, for the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer.



Global ROS1 initiative: A patient-researcher collaboration targeting ROS1 cancer

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:04:20 -0700

CU presentation at AACR2018 describes the first research-focused group of patients organized around the genetic mutation that creates their cancer, namely changes to the gene ROS1.



For aggressive breast cancer in the brain, researchers clarify immune response

Tue, 17 Apr 18 00:04:50 -0700

In a preliminary study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2018 in Chicago, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center revealed findings for what kind of immune response the body is staging against triple negative breast cancer that has spread to the brain. They hope they can use these findings to improve patient responses to drugs that work by unleashing the immune system against cancer.



When prostate cancer reaches bone, bone cells may drive overall growth of the disease

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:14:50 -0700

When prostate cancer metastasizes to bone, it can become especially dangerous. A CU study at AACR18 hints at why: cells involved in these bone metastases may release signals that drive the progression of the disease.



Study examines accuracy of test for lymph node metastases in women with breast cancer

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:15:30 -0700

A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that axillary ultrasound imaging is inferior for detecting axillary node metastasis in patients with breast cancer.



Three-fold higher risk of cancer after acute thrombosis in the leg

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:16:20 -0700

The risk of developing cancer is more than three times higher during the first six months following blood clot in the leg, compared with the background population. This is shown by a register-based study that medical doctor and Ph.D. Jens Sundbøll has recently published in the journal Circulation. Jens Sundbøll is employed at the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, which is part of the Department of Clinical Medicine at Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital.



Is whole-brain radiation still best for brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer?

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:02:40 -0700

University of Colorado Cancer Center study compares outcomes of 5,752 small-cell lung cancer patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) with those of 200 patients who received stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), finding that the median overall survival was actually longer with SRS (10.8 months with SRS versus 7.1 months with WBRT).



Man-made antibodies show promise in attacking cancer cells in animal models

Mon, 16 Apr 18 00:04:30 -0700

Using chemotherapy along with aptamers -- lab-made molecules that function like antibodies -- Duke Health researchers showed that they can zero in on and kill prostate cancer tumors in mice while leaving healthy tissue unscathed.



First-in-human clinical trial of new targeted therapy drug reports promising responses for multiple

Sun, 15 Apr 18 00:16:20 -0700

A phase I, first-in-human study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reveals for the first time, an investigational drug that is effective and safe for patients with cancers caused by an alteration in the receptor tyrosine kinase known as RET. The drug appears to be promising as a potential therapy for RET-driven cancers, such as medullary and papillary thyroid, non-small cell lung, colorectal and bile duct cancers, which have been historically difficult to treat.



A novel precision cancer model opens doors to personalized cancer treatment

Fri, 13 Apr 18 00:05:50 -0700

Researchers from the Seve Ballesteros Foundation-CNIO Brain Tumour Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have developed an extremely powerful and versatile mouse model that will improve cancer research and accelerate preclinical testing of novel targeted therapies. Their work appears in Nature Communications.



Mount Sinai research on omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for dry eye

Fri, 13 Apr 18 00:14:00 -0700

Results show the supplement is no better than placebo in relieving signs and symptoms of disease.



Omega-3s from fish oil supplements no better than placebo for dry eye

Fri, 13 Apr 18 00:13:50 -0700

Omega-3 fatty acid supplements taken orally proved no better than placebo at relieving symptoms or signs of dry eye, according to the findings of a well-controlled trial funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health.



New study finds omega-3 fatty acid supplements ineffective in treating dry eye disease

Fri, 13 Apr 18 00:13:40 -0700

Findings from a new randomized clinical trial, now show that contrary to long-held beliefs, omega-3 supplements are no more effective than placebo at alleviating dry eye symptoms. For years, patients and their eye doctors have turned to omega-3 fatty acids commonly found in fish-derived supplements as a treatment for the disease. The results are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.



To starve pancreatic tumors, researchers seek to block 'self-eating,' other fuel sources

Fri, 13 Apr 18 00:15:00 -0700

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and their collaborators are reporting preclinical findings for a potential two-treatment strategy to block multiple mechanisms of cancer cell metabolism in pancreatic cancer at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in Chicago. The findings will be presented from 8 a.m. to noon on Wednesday.



Nutrition, physical activity guidelines and survival after colon cancer diagnosis

Thu, 12 Apr 18 00:10:30 -0700

A lifestyle consistent with the American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines to maintain a healthy weight, engage in regular physical activity, and eat a diet rich in nutritious foods was associated with a lower risk of death in patients with colon cancer.



Discovery of switchblade-like defensive system redraws family tree of stonefishes

Thu, 12 Apr 18 00:11:40 -0700

A study from the University of Kansas appearing in the journal Copeia details for the first time evolution of a 'lachrymal saber' unique to stonefishes -- a group of rare and elaborately dangerous fishes inhabiting Indo-Pacific coastal waters. The new finding rewrites scientific understanding of relationships among several groups of fishes and reveals a previously unknown defensive strategy -- also, it likely will fuel a few nightmares.



Inhibiting metabolism found to be effective in treating aggressive form of lung cancer

Thu, 12 Apr 18 00:00:00 -0700

Researchers from UCLA and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center have found that two targeted therapies could be more effective if used in combination to treat squamous cell carcinomas of the lung



Art is in the eye of the beholder

Thu, 12 Apr 18 00:06:50 -0700

A researcher from James Cook University in Australia has found that a person's mental state affects how they look at art.



The emotions we feel may shape what we see

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:14:20 -0700

Our emotional state in a given moment may influence what we see, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. In two experiments, researchers found that participants saw a neutral face as smiling more when it was paired with an unseen positive image.



New glaucoma treatment could ease symptoms while you sleep

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:14:00 -0700

Eye drops developed by UBC researchers could one day treat glaucoma while you sleep -- helping to heal a condition that is one of the leading causes of blindness around the world.



Simultaneous chemo and immunotherapy may be better for some with metastatic bladder cancer

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:15:50 -0700

Researchers from Mount Sinai and Sema4, a health information company and Mount Sinai venture, have discovered that giving metastatic bladder cancer patients simultaneous chemotherapy and immunotherapy is safe and that patients whose tumors have certain genetic mutations may respond particularly well to this combination approach, according to the results of a clinical trial published in European Urology.



Having one eye better than the other may explain ants' left bias

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:15:20 -0700

Unlike Derek Zoolander, ants don't have any difficulty turning left. New research from the University of Bristol has now found rock ants often have one eye slightly better than the other, which could help explain why most of them prefer to turn left, given the choice.



Babies make the link between vocal and facial emotion

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:13:20 -0700

The ability of babies to differentiate emotional expressions appears to develop during their first six months. But do they really recognise emotion or do they only distinguish the physical characteristics of faces and voices? Researchers from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, have just provided an initial answer to this question, measuring the ability of six-month-old babies to make a connection between a voice expressing happiness or anger and the emotional expression on a face.



Training the immune system to fight ovarian cancer

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:13:00 -0700

A personalized cancer vaccine safely and successfully boosted immune responses and increased survival rates in patients with ovarian cancer, according to results from a pilot clinical trial.



Ludwig scientists share new cancer research findings at 2018 AACR Annual Meeting

Wed, 11 Apr 18 00:15:00 -0700

Ludwig Cancer Research released today the full scope of findings to be presented by Ludwig researchers at this year's American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill., April 14-18, 2018. Research conducted by more than 100 Ludwig scientists will be presented in symposiums, plenaries, town meetings, education sessions and poster sessions.



Early 'chemobrain' intervention needed for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy
More support is needed to help breast cancer patients and survivors manage 'chemobrain' symptoms, such as memory loss, short attention span and mental confusion, according to a study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore.