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Preview: Deb Price from Creators Syndicate

Deb Price from Creators Syndicate



Creators Syndicate is an international syndication company that represents cartoonists and columnists of the highest caliber.



Last Build Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2018 06:31:40 -0800

 



One Very Gay Time for 06/01/2010

Tue, 01 Jun 2010 21:00:00 -0700

"So tell me, America, how do I introduce Joyce?"

I posed that question back in May 1992 in the first column I ever wrote. That debut was an earthshaking breakthrough — a nationally syndicated, weekly column in mainstream newspapers about life from a gay perspective.

Over the next 18 years — and about 900 columns — I introduced my readers, mostly heterosexuals, to a gay couple — Joyce and me — and countless other wonderful people we met along our journalistic adventure.

Updated: Tue Jun 01, 2010




Imagine no "Don't Ask" for 03/23/2010

Tue, 23 Mar 2010 21:00:00 -0700

Updated: Tue Mar 23, 2010




Openness Driving Nation Forward for 02/16/2010

Tue, 16 Feb 2010 21:00:00 -0800

What's the difference between "homosexuals" and "gay men and lesbians"?

Turns out a lot — a whopping 14 percentage points of support, a New York Times-CBS News poll released on Feb. 11 revealed.

Only 44 percent of adults support the idea of "homosexuals" serving openly in the military, while 58 percent favor allowing "gay men and lesbians" to serve openly.

Updated: Tue Feb 16, 2010




House of Cards Collapsing on Opponents of Gay Soldiers for 02/09/2010

Tue, 09 Feb 2010 21:00:00 -0800

The absolute worst nightmare of diehard defenders of Don't Ask, Don't Tell has become reality: They're now fighting the Pentagon, including the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

"Speaking for myself and myself only, it is my personal belief that allowing gays and lesbians to serve openly would be the right thing to do," Adm. Mike Mullen said in riveting, military-man eloquent testimony Feb. 2 before the Senate Armed Services Committee.

"No matter how I look at this issue," the chairman of the Joint Chiefs continued, "I cannot escape being troubled by the fact that we have in place a policy which forces young men and women to lie about who they are in order to defend their fellow citizens. For me personally, it comes down to integrity — theirs as individuals and ours as an institution."

Updated: Tue Feb 09, 2010




A Gay Celluloid Gem Not to Be Missed for 01/05/2010

Tue, 05 Jan 2010 21:00:00 -0800

College English professor George Falconer, the lead character in the poignant new film "A Single Man," suffers from an all-too-common, devastating illness: a broken heart.

George had achieved something quite enviable at any time, let alone in the conformist years after World War II, when a snickering aside that someone was "light in his loafers" could torpedo a career. He'd settled down with the love of his life, blissfully becoming "George and Jim."

As we see in a bittersweet flashback, the couple built an idyllic life in Southern California, so comfy that neither wants to get up from where they're cuddled up reading — their sweet pups nearby — to change the music. The dogs are the smart ones, Jim observes, because they savor the now.

Updated: Tue Jan 05, 2010




Auditioning to Pick Up Where Kennedy Left Off for 11/24/2009

Tue, 24 Nov 2009 21:00:00 -0800

Moments before Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley boldly announced her challenge to the 1996 federal law that forbids Uncle Sam to recognize same-sex marriages, she paused to stress that extending rights to gay couples is perfectly in keeping with America's highest ideals.

Speaking at a news conference shortly after our nation celebrated Independence Day last summer, she pointed out that the phrase "all men are created equal" was originally taken to mean only certain men. That changed, she continued, because of Americans' "evolving sense of what liberty and justice and equality for all meant."

Coakley is the first attorney general to file suit over the so-called Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). In doing so, she declared that, viewed with 21st century eyes, our Founding Fathers' vision of equality means it's unconstitutional for the federal government to deny the 1,100-plus rights and benefits of marriage to the 16,000 same-sex couples legally wed in Massachusetts. And, likewise, it's wrong to threaten to yank back federal dollars from Massachusetts for treating its gay and heterosexual married couples the same.

Updated: Tue Nov 24, 2009




Obama Invites Gay Americans in for 09/15/2009

Tue, 15 Sep 2009 21:00:00 -0700

Updated: Tue Sep 15, 2009




Gay Lawyers Hopeful About Justice Sotomayor for 08/11/2009

Tue, 11 Aug 2009 21:00:00 -0700

To gay Americans, Sonia Sotomayor isn't just any new justice: She will likely hold the balance on a Supreme Court believed to be evenly divided over gay Americans' basic constitutional rights.

The justice she replaces, David Souter, had tilted the advantage to the court's gay-friendly wing.

How might Sotomayor rule on gay marriage? Gays in the military? In custody disputes between lesbian moms living in separate states with vastly different outlooks on gay parenting rights? Or, on the employment rights of transgender Americans?

Updated: Tue Aug 11, 2009




Massachusetts Challenges Uncle Sam To Be Fair for 08/04/2009

Tue, 04 Aug 2009 21:00:00 -0700

As it has done countless times before, Massachusetts has promised a former military man and his lawfully wedded spouse that — when the time comes — they can both be buried in a veterans' cemetery. But this time, Uncle Sam is threatening to take back up to $19 million in grant money if the state keeps its pledge about the spouse's final resting place.

Why? The federal government doesn't yet recognize the same-sex couple as married.

Refusing to be bullied into discriminating, Massachusetts treats all of its married couples the same. So, it shells out an extra $2.4 million a year to make up for the Medicaid money Uncle Sam withholds as a result of treating low-income gay married couples as single.

Updated: Tue Aug 04, 2009




Bi-National Gay Couples Cry Out for Security for 07/07/2009

Tue, 07 Jul 2009 21:00:00 -0700

Shortly before dawn on Jan. 28, a knock at the door turned the idyllic life of Shirley Tan and her family upside-down.

Agents from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement handed a deportation letter to Tan, the stay-at-home lesbian mom of 12-year-old twin boys. Stunned, Tan, who describes herself as a "housewife," told the agents she had never before seen the letter, dated 2002.

"I was handcuffed and taken away, like a criminal," Tan recently told the Senate Judiciary Committee, which called a first-ever hearing to look into the outrageous harm done to gay bi-national families by locking them out of the protections built into immigration law for heterosexual spouses of U.S. citizens.

Updated: Tue Jul 07, 2009




A Gay Day at the White House for 06/30/2009

Tue, 30 Jun 2009 21:00:00 -0700

President Barack Obama's unprecedented White House celebration of the four-decades-long struggle of gay Americans for full equality hit all the right notes, including the host's acknowledgement that politicians' pretty words are no substitute for getting rid of discriminatory laws.

Standing beside a beaming first lady in the ornate East Room on Monday, Obama warmly welcomed more than 250 gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Americans "to your White House."

The inspiring guest list ranged from two men who in 1969 resisted police harassment at the Stonewall bar — the rebellion that kicked off the modern-day gay-rights movement — to such gutsy contemporary trailblazers as Episcopal Bishop Gene Robinson, former U.S. ambassadors Jim Hormel and Michael Guest, and Office of Personnel Management Director John Berry.

Updated: Tue Jun 30, 2009




Plenty of Smiles in Fifth Anniversary Pictures for 05/26/2009

Tue, 26 May 2009 21:00:00 -0700

Mark Schuster and Jeffrey Webb are immigrants of a different sort.

So are Lynn Adler and Paige Warren.

The gay American couples resettled in Massachusetts, where they are treated — legally and socially — like any other married folks.

Updated: Tue May 26, 2009




Prom Rights Mean Gay Teens Can Enjoy Prom Night for 04/28/2009

Tue, 28 Apr 2009 21:00:00 -0700

A flyer announcing this year's prom at Jim Hill High School in Jackson, Miss., stated upfront what at many schools is usually a far more subtle message to gay students: "All dates must be of the opposite sex."

The flyer, posted around the school, fortunately caught the eye of Brittany Crowell, a heterosexual senior who, thanks to her volunteer work at the American Civil Liberties Union, knows the rights of her gay friends.

The 17-year-old took one of the flyers to the ACLU, which wrote to the principal and district superintendent to explain that banning same-sex dates from the prom would violate the court-recognized constitutional rights of gay students.

Updated: Tue Apr 28, 2009




Can GOP's Old Elephant Learn New Tricks? for 04/21/2009

Tue, 21 Apr 2009 21:00:00 -0700

Rumblings of change are beginning to be heard from deep inside the Republican Party.

The gay Log Cabin Republicans' recent national convention offered a tantalizing peek at a possible not-so-distant future when the Republican Party has finally — and firmly — turned the corner and embraced equality for gay Americans.

Marquee speakers were Steve Schmidt, former senior campaign strategist for 2008 Republican presidential nominee John McCain, and former New Jersey governor Christie Todd Whitman, a founder of the moderate Republican Leadership Council.

Updated: Tue Apr 21, 2009




Air Force Nurse Serves by Fighting Back for 03/22/2009

Sun, 22 Mar 2009 21:00:00 -0700

Margaret Witt's idea of playtime was a bit unusual for a girl growing up in the early '70s:

Dressed in a military uniform, she bandaged "wounded soldier" playmates, just like her heroines, Florence Nightingale and Clara Barton, had actually done in wartime.

"They had that little something extra. And I wanted to be like them," Witt said recently in explaining why she joined the Air Force 22 years ago. "I wanted to be all I could be. And I wanted to have not a job but an adventure."

Updated: Sun Mar 22, 2009




Obama Will Carve Name on Federal Bench for 03/15/2009

Sun, 15 Mar 2009 21:00:00 -0700

Want a hint of just how much President Obama's eventual appointees will change the nation's federal appeals courts? Take a peek at a tip sheet offered by a scholar at the Brookings Institution.

Just before the November elections, Russell Wheeler, a visiting fellow at Brookings and prominent court watcher, calculated what impact the victor could have in one term over these hugely powerful federal courts.

A John McCain presidency, he estimated, would result in all 13 federal courts of appeals having Republican majorities, with 11 of those being "solid majorities."

Updated: Sun Mar 15, 2009




A Simple Change Would End Couple's Nightmare for 02/15/2009

Sun, 15 Feb 2009 21:00:00 -0800

Glance through the snow-framed windows of Vermont homes, and you'll see couples like Sissi and Janet poring through seed catalogues and dreaming of spring.

But unlike their friends in the Green Mountain state, Sissi and Janet won't be planting, harvesting and feasting together.

Nor will they be able to spend their 25th anniversary on May 24 together, continue worshiping together at their Episcopal church or participate in a community project to grow vegetables for the hungry.

Updated: Sun Feb 15, 2009




Optimistic Voices Heard on Capitol Hill for 01/11/2009

Sun, 11 Jan 2009 21:00:00 -0800

If Hollywood made a movie of the last Congress on gay issues, "The Pragmatist vs. the Idealist" would someday play at a theater near you.

The pragmatist was the colorful and brilliant bulldog Rep. Barney Frank, who arrived in Congress in 1981 as a closeted gay man, came out on his own in 1987 and admirably chose to become a voice for gay America in the "people's house."

The idealist was the ever-optimistic Rep. Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, who carries the can-do spirit of someone gutsy enough to run for Congress in 1998 as a lesbian — and win.

Updated: Sun Jan 11, 2009




Transgender Americans Need Workplace Protections for 12/14/2008

Sun, 14 Dec 2008 21:00:00 -0800

Six months ago, a highly decorated retired Army colonel told Congress of instantly going from "hero to zero" in the eyes of a prospective employer when she disclosed that she was in the process of changing gender.

Since that hearing, Congress has done nothing to protect transgender workers, despite evidence of outrageous job discrimination.

But a federal judge has stepped in to say that the Library of Congress broke the law against sex discrimination by rescinding the job offer it had made before learning David Schroer was becoming Diane.

Updated: Sun Dec 14, 2008




Through Powerful New Film, Harvey Milk Continues to Inspire for 12/07/2008

Sun, 07 Dec 2008 21:00:00 -0800

As he turned 40, Harvey Milk was a closeted insurance salesman who looked for love in New York City cruising spots, always fearing a police bust would end his career, as it did to so many gay men of his generation.

Then, in a phenomenal eight-year burst of courage and leadership, he moved to San Francisco, came out, opened a camera shop in the gay Castro neighborhood and repeatedly ran for office until he won a spot on the city's Board of Supervisors.

Milk inspired and cajoled countless people into getting honest with heterosexual friends and relatives about being gay, because he knew only truth was powerful enough to halt the wave of anti-gay laws spearheaded by singer Anita Bryant.

Updated: Sun Dec 07, 2008