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Preview: Comments on Grumpy Old Bookman: Why do I love Mondays?

Comments on Grumpy Old Bookman: Why do I love Mondays?





Updated: 2018-01-17T05:56:38.258+00:00

 



As regards the Writers Literary Agency, beware. De...

2007-07-24T21:27:00.000+01:00

As regards the Writers Literary Agency, beware. Details here:

http://www.sfwa.org/beware/twentyworst.html



I have found that my content is not what is lackin...

2007-07-24T20:55:00.000+01:00

I have found that my content is not what is lacking. Writing is just part of the problem. It will offer no solution to many of us who feel they should be published. I have since found a literary agency that has helped. www.wlwritersagency.com has provided help that i have yet to receive from anywhere else. I would definately recommend this site to those who have yet to discover ans audience or a vendor for there words. Extremely helpful.



Despite the power they wield over writers, as the ...

2007-07-24T18:14:00.000+01:00

Despite the power they wield over writers, as the gatekeepers of very minor fame & very little money, publishers & agents are just people who live in the right place (London, if they're UK), went through the right hoops (Oxbridge or similar), sucked the right cocks, and then find themselves not earning much money - in one of the world's most expensive cities - to read what must be mainly crap; they are understandably not at their best, and their judgements are notoriously suspect.



I misread "I kind of like odd addresses" as "I kin...

2007-07-24T07:16:00.000+01:00

I misread "I kind of like odd addresses" as "I kind of like odd dresses". GOB, would you like me to call you Loretta?



God, how interesting! I mean, the comment that peo...

2007-07-24T00:28:00.000+01:00

God, how interesting! I mean, the comment that people in publishing "seem to hate writers and writing." I sometimes wonder whether it's broader than that, that it books they somehow hate. Or is it the old saw about editorial types being frustrated writers?

On the other hand, I like to think that one thing that makes me a good book designer and page layout artist is that I really like books and good writing.

Funny (to me, at least), that I remember to this day the first rejection notice I ever got. When I was 13 years old, I sent a short, short story to a magazine that--in my estimation, published "nice" stories, which my story pretty much was. I received the standard rejection slip, with an additon: a really kind, encouraging note had been handwritten on it. I lived of that slip for 10 years, while I turned that "well written, but too short" story into a bad, unpublishable novel.



Woodiwiss's popularity can just as easily prove th...

2007-07-23T21:03:00.000+01:00

Woodiwiss's popularity can just as easily prove that there are many readers who enjoy novels that are "absurdly overdramatic, overwritten, overlong, and filled with ludicrous sex scenes."



You are always an insight into the literay world, ...

2007-07-23T19:31:00.000+01:00

You are always an insight into the literay world, sugar!
Thanks for the blog links...made a Monday afternoon most tolerable.



36 million readers?Anyone think she'd give a rat's...

2007-07-23T16:22:00.000+01:00

36 million readers?

Anyone think she'd give a rat's arse about what some twit on the Telegraph thinks?

This woman's story is the story of someone delivering pleasure to millions.

It's simply bad reporting.



I was quite touched by your comments regarding the...

2007-07-23T15:58:00.000+01:00

I was quite touched by your comments regarding the late Kathleen Woodiwiss. And I'm offended by the shoddy treatment she was given at the hands of the Telegraph. Here's a lady "swept off her feet by...a dashing and rugged lieutenant in the US Air Force" who then went on to write that very sort of thing--for 36 million readers. A shameful comment by the Telegraph.

May she continue to get the credit she deserves by millions more readers.



Interestingly, I had a rejection letter in which t...

2007-07-23T14:16:00.000+01:00

Interestingly, I had a rejection letter in which the 'writer' (of the rejection) felt it her mission to instruct me as to the nastiness of my characters. She was quite hurtful and seemed to suggest I was 'evil' for having thought them up. Her letter seemed designed to discourage me from any further literary procreation.

I (innocently) thought that nasty characters existed in real life as well as fiction, and I believe an actual person who takes the time to tell a writer his characters are nasty, and 'therefore unpublishable', is rather nastier than any fictional nasty could manage (given that they do not exist). I do recollect reading, in my time, quite a few very entertaining nasties within published literature. Had she taken issue with the actual words, rather than her reaction to them, I might have believed she understood what fiction is for.

I used to think that drawing interesting characters was what writing was about until I read letter after letter telling me that my characters were wonderful but the market just wasn't there, or my characters were beautifully wrought, but verisimilitude was not enough, or that my characters were all horrible, vile creatures who did not deserve to live.

Now, if I go bugger a famous person (or animal, or editor) will my characters (that attract so much comment); will they get to live?

Why do people in publishing seem to hate writers and writing so?

I understand they have to wade through great avalanches of dung but they don't wade very far, do they?

I remember a girl who worked at an agency telling me that my novel wasn't what she expected, and if only she could get people to actually read it 'they'd see as well'. Even more interestingly, the agent she worked for actually offered to take me on as a client without reading the novel. (I turned him down.)

Maybe the mistake they're making is in the idea that they have to read anything at all? Doesn't that just get in the way?

I tire of hearing how these poor folks have read three billion manuscripts apiece and only ever published one or two. What, exactly, are they trying to tell us?

I've owned dogs with more intelligence than that.

It is a strange world indeed when the people charged with finding and publishing fiction seem to hate everything about writing and writers.

Always writers are 'would-be' until some upper-middle class schoolgirl decides they are proper writers?

The only people who ever read my first novel were readers. Every single correspondence from a publisher or agent I ever had was filled with enough evidence to prove that they had not read the damned thing.

Even the agent I eventually went with had not read it. (But it got him a good few intros to publishers who had skimmed the first two pages.)

I disagree with Michael on one important point. I believe it is indeed possible to rise from the slush but to do so one must write exactly that book which everyone in the chain would have written themselves, if they could write. (But blowjobs do help, apparently.)



Boy, you really don't want to offend a fiction edi...

2007-07-23T12:22:00.000+01:00

Boy, you really don't want to offend a fiction editor, do you? Funny story about the mean, mean rejection, but even the nice ones sometimes go awry. If interested, check out more thoughts on rejections at www.literaryrejecitonsondisplay.blogspot.com