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9Tail Fox by Jon Courtenay Grimwood

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

On the reassuringly familiar side, this is a murder mystery. Sergeant Bobby Zha works for the San Francisco Police Department and he's trying to find out who has murdered him. One minute he's round the back of a warehouse with his gun drawn, the next he's a coma patient waking up after years in a medical facility. And if that wasn't weird enough, now he's being haunted by a nine-tailed Celestial fox.



A Conversation With Pat Cadigan

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

"When Cyberpunk started, the desktop computer was still a fairly new idea. Now everybody's got one. Not only has everybody got one, but everyone either has a palm pilot or a laptop or both. Cyberpunk isn't dead, it's just much more part of everybody's day-to-day existence. So naturally, the way you write about these things changes. You don't go on writing about the impact of the telephone on society. There is no impact of the telephone on society any more. The telephone is part of the standard furniture of our lives. So if you write about the telephone, you don't write about its impact on society as a whole -- unless of course you're writing historical fiction."



Schrodinger's Bookshelf: a column by Michael M Jones

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Michael is reading short fiction and young adult titles and he has some thoughts. This time, he looks at Children of Magic edited by Martin H. Greenberg and Kerrie Hughes and Hags, Sirens & Other Bad Girls of Fantasy edited by Denise Little.



Star Wars: Outbound Flight by Timothy Zahn

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

A prequel to 2004's Survivor's Quest, the story takes us back to a post-war Naboo, before the inception of the Clone Army. The reader gets to meet a non-clone Jorus C'baoth and see the beginnings of the Outbound Flight project, which, theoretically, will take Jedi and settlers to the far reaches of the next galaxy.



A Rift in Time by Michael Parziale

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

When science fiction and fantasy collide, the result can often be a magical fantasy society located on an alien planet or far future Earth. The setting of this debut novel (the first of a series), though, is pretty much the opposite: a Fantasyland "gone all sci-fi." The map at the front and the place names would be right at home in an epic fantasy; yet Aldurea is a futuristic world of hover-cars, energy swords and "dark matter" gateways. It's a set-up full of possibility.



Cartomancy by Michael Stackpole

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Possibly it's just that this is Book 2 of a series (something that doesn't actually appear anywhere on the FRONT page of the paperback, and which, if Alma had been aware of its nature, she might have thought twice about leaping into mid-stream as it were, trilogies being what they are. But on the whole, she doesn't think that this book would have taken her beyond those initial pages, whatever its birth order was. There were just too many things...



Triskell Tales 2 by Charles de Lint

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Charles de Lint has an absolutely wonderful tradition going on. Every year, he self-publishes, under the aegis of Triskell Press, a small chapbook, whose circulation is limited to friends and family, and he sends these out for Christmas. So every Christmas, his nearest and dearest get an uncommissioned story. But why stop there? Eventually, be it sooner or later, he makes those chapbooks available to a wider audience. In the first volume of Triskell Tales (Subterranean Press, 2000), he collected the first twenty-two years worth. This volume brings together seven more tales written over the last six years, 2000-2005.



The Ocean and Other Devices by William Browning Spencer

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

More than ten years after his first collection, the critically acclaimed The Return of Count Electric, William Browning Spencer returns, much to his fans' delight, with a second volume of short fiction. This book assembles nine previously published stories, scattered so far among the pages of a number of genre magazines.



Visionary in Residence by Bruce Sterling

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

It is a curious thing when the cutting edge starts to become blunt, as if the future is no longer what we imagined it might be. Bruce Sterling we remember as the author of "Taklamakan" and "Bicycle Repairman" and a dozen other stories that sliced so deep into the future that they made it bleed. But in this collection, while Sterling remains as hip to new ideas as ever he was, there is nothing that even breaks the skin.



Path of the Bold edited by James Lowder

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

This anthology is the follow up to Path of the Just, although not strictly a sequel as there are no direct continuations among the stories. As with its predecessor, this is an ensemble production, featuring loosely connected stories from fifteen writers, one of whom is also the editor. The loose connection is that all the tales take place in or around Empire City, a twin for Astro City or Gotham. Like those places, it's a locale where super heroes and villains are a common fact of life, with all their attendant glamour and danger.



Banana Sunday by Root Nibot and Colleen Coover

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Well known for a delightful adults-only comic book series, Small Favors, these creators now offer an equally entertaining all-ages project. Kirby Steinberg is a high school student, but also the guardian of three lower primates. Transferring into a new high school, her wards accompany her. In several student assemblies about the animals, she explains they are the result of secret primate research done by her father. But Nickel, a high school newspaper reporter, suspects that Kirby isn't being candid about the nature of the primates, and tries to uncover the truth.



Babylon 5.1

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

With the 2005-2006 TV season is just about over, Rick has some thoughts on TV on the TV season, what's good, what's not and which will be back next year.



The Complete Chronicles of Conan by Robert E. Howard

Tue, 16 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

If you only know Conan the Barbarian from the dreary Arnold Schwarzenegger films or from the colorful Marvel Comics version, you don't know Conan. The character created by Robert E. Howard to traverse the breadth of lands during the Hyborian Age is much more complex and nuanced than either of those versions, or of the popular image. All of the stories Howard managed to finish about Conan appear in this edition, published to recognize the hundredth anniversary of Howard's birth.



The Best of Philip Jose Farmer by Philip Jose Farmer

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Any 'best of' title is, by its nature, prone to individual interpretation, and putting together a cross section of work by an author as prolific as Philip Jose Farmer was never going to be easy. Some of his best includes entire series, which clearly could not form part of this single book collection, although the Riverworld is represented here. What the book does manage, is to provide an excellent primer for what made Farmer so popular for so long. Readers who have heard his name, and want to know what all the fuss is about without risking their cash on an entire series, should start here.



A Conversation With Tom Lloyd

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

"Well I started with the image of the deserted palace but very little beyond that, so I sat and just began to jot ideas down. I've always loved the parts of ancient mythology where the gods are active in the world and meddle as much as they can. I started with almost a Norse mindset of deities; squabbling, argumentative and lacking any form of subtlety. From that, it seemed reasonable that their chosen mortal representatives would be similar; principally be built to fight and overawe the people they're going to be ruling, so white-eyes became these oversized figures of supernatural strength and speed."



Schrodinger's Bookshelf: a column by Michael M Jones

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Michael is reading short fiction and young adult titles and he has some thoughts. This time, he looks at Millennium 3001 edited by Martin H. Greenberg and Russell Davis, Novel Ideas: Fantasy and Novel Ideas: Science Fiction both edited by Brian M. Thomsen.



New Arrivals compiled by Neil Walsh

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Some of the highlights from our most recent crop of new arrivals include the latest novels from David & Leigh Eddings, L.E. Modesitt Jr., Robert Carter, Sean Williams, and Christopher Moore, as well as the latest collections from Paul Di Filippo, George Zebrowski, Philip Jose Farmer, and SF poet Mike Allen.



Electric Velocipede #9

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

This is a 'zine with a quiet reputation for printing some of the best short fiction from the odder corners of SF and fantasy, and this issue continues to uphold that reputation. The craftsmanship of most of the work here is enviable. More remarkably (or maybe just plain odd), nearly all the titles in this issue define their stories' main characters.



A Game of Perfection by Elisabeth Vonarburg

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

In Dreams of the Sea, an accident stranded human colonists on a planet they named Virginia, and the few survivors had to struggle to live until the next colony ship arrived. This novel opens much later, after the active colonization of Virginia is over and millions of humans have been living on the planet all their lives. But they still have not solved the mystery of what happened to the alien race that inhabited the planet centuries before and then suddenly disappeared, leaving all their cities intact as if everybody had just stood up and walked away.



The Brief History of the Dead by Kevin Brockmeier

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

We begin with a city: vast, mysterious, a good place for the living dead to hang out while they wait to be forgotten. In this cosmology (apparently inspired by a vague mix of African and Asian mythoi) purgatory is urban, and the spirits or souls or somethings of the dead inhabit it until they are no longer remembered by the living, and then they cross over to an unknown realm, truly dead and truly gone, their history lost with their names.



K-Machines by Damien Broderick

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Sequel to Godplayers, this novel continues the story of August Seebeck, an ordinary Australian man who is suddenly brought to realize that he is part of a family, all named after the months, August has been told that he and his family are "Players in the Contest of Worlds," battling foes known as the "Deformers" for -- for what?



Genetopia by Keith Brooke

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

In the distant future, the world is saturated in "changing vectors," bio- and nano-technological agents that alter those who come into contact with them in unpredictable ways. The clans of "True" humanity guard the purity of their genes jealously: babies showing signs of being affected are left out to die from exposure, and the purebreds want nothing to do with "Lost" humans. But there's a thriving slave trade in "mutts," individuals so drastically transformed that they are regarded as animals.



Firebirds edited by Sharyn November

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Amal was really, really excited about this anthology when it came out, and even more excited by the prospect of reviewing it. She offers this by way of apology for any indulging in school-girlish glee on her part while describing its contents. She offers also the testimony of her sister's puzzled looks, occasioned by giggles, shocked exclamations and occasional teary effusions while reading, in proof of the fact that this will be a fairly gushy review.



One Million A.D. edited by Gardner Dozois

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

This is an anthology of six original novellas of the very far future, commissioned by the Science Fiction Book Club, in a departure from their usual reprints-only policy. The authors are all well-known: Robert Reed, Robert Silverberg, Nancy Kress, Alastair Reynolds, Charlie Stross, and Greg Egan. Plus a nice introduction by super-editor Gardner Dozois. A stellar lineup!



Blade: The Series: a promotion

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

BLADE: THE SERIES premieres on June 28. Spike TV's two-hour series premiere opens with Blade setting up shop in Detroit, investigating the vampire house of Chthon. Along the way he forms an uneasy alliance with Krista Starr, a former military veteran who becomes entrenched in the world of vampires while investigating the murder of her twin brother. Enter the contest to visit the set where the series is filmed at http://www.bladetv-contest.com/.



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Rick offers his thoughts on the announcement of Star Trek XI coming in 2008, how Christopher Eccleston is beginning to win him over in the role of the Doctor Who along with what to watch on TV in May.



Silver Screen by Justina Robson

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

The title refers to the black and white cinema of the mid-twentieth century when movie stars were literally larger than life depictions back in the days before Internet circulation of celebrity sex tapes shrunk them down to size. The analogy is that the interface between human and machine intelligence mimics the quality of these films in that they are seemingly real, but at the same time obviously not. It also underlies a conceit where avatars projected by the machine to interact with humans appear as classic screen idols such as Humphrey Bogart and James Dean and, of course, the symbolic baggage they carry.



A Rumor of Gems by Ellen Steiber

Mon, 1 May 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Lucinda, has always lived in the cosmopolitan port city of Arcato. A strikingly beautiful woman, she works as a model for the exclusive clothing designer, Tyrone, a flamboyant tyrant who is also her only friend. Angry and fiercely defended, Lucinda uses and discards men before they can hurt her. Although she keeps to herself, Lucinda has heard rumours of odd happenings in Arcato. Those charming, quirky miracles are occurring amid other, darker supernatural events.



RSS Feeds

Sat, 1 Jan 2005 11:00:00 GMT

After constructing our first RSS feed, it soon became apparent that the size of files could grow quickly. We decided to separate them into smaller ones, breaking them up by month. On this page you will find RSS feed files for all of our content beginning with January 2005.