Subscribe: Comments on Greg's Cool [Insert Clever Name] of the Day: New SQL Server 2008 T-SQL Features - It's the litt...
http://coolthingoftheday.blogspot.com/feeds/582968652343211250/comments/default
Preview: Comments on Greg's Cool [Insert Clever Name] of the Day: New SQL Server 2008 T-SQL Features - It's the litt...

Comments on Greg's Cool [Insert Clever Name] of the Day: New SQL Server 2008 T-SQL Features - It's the little things that are cool...





Updated: 2018-01-11T06:51:26.239-08:00

 



Personally, I'm not interested in hiring developer...

2007-10-18T14:19:00.000-07:00

Personally, I'm not interested in hiring developers who think that one language can/should solve every problem.

C# sprocs, for better or worse, are often banned. Might be nice to know another way to skin that cat.



This is indeed cool info as it will make the T-SQL...

2007-08-22T06:23:00.000-07:00

This is indeed cool info as it will make the T-SQL easier to read. As for the CLR stuff, CLR has it's place. An all out replacement for stored procedures is not it. A DBA who wants to ban CLR procedures simply because they are CLR procedures does not understand what .NET can offer. Alternatively, a Developer who wants to strictly use CLR as opposed to T-SQL does not understand the benefits of T-SQL over .NET. T-SQL is not hard so the "they only have to learn one language" argument is hard for me to bite onto.



T-SQL only just getting to this point in syntax no...

2007-08-01T17:24:00.000-07:00

T-SQL only just getting to this point in syntax now! :) All the more reason for me to continue to think that sensible, disciplined coding of stored procs in C# is the better way to go. Your developers only need to understand one language (C#) and one DB mechanism (ADO), rather than a second in both cases (i.e. T-SQL).

Most DBA's I know hate the idea of C# sprocs and try to get them banned organisationally. I put that down to them not being able to read C# and vet the sprocs.

cheers