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Iraq Veterans Against the War - Teach-in





 



21st Century American Militarism: Occupation Abroad and Resistance at Home

Mon, 08 Jul 2013 22:45:52 +0000

Click here to join, like, and share the event on Facebook.  After more than ten years of occupations, drone strikes, torture campaigns and ecological devastation, Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW) continues to organize and fight against US militarism.  For this plenary panel and fundraising event during IVAW’s National Convention IVAW is proud to have guest speakers, writer & professor Christian Parenti, Iraqi-American artist & professor Michael Rakowitz, Afghans United for Justice member & organizer Suraia Sahar, historian & writer Nick Turse, along with other great speakers for an evening of commentary, discussion and analysis of the state and future of U.S. Militarism. Please come out and support IVAW for this special evening.  SPEAKERS: Nick Turse is an award-winning journalist, historian, essayist, the managing editor of TomDispatch.com, the co-founder of Dispatch Books, and a fellow at the Nation Institute. He is the author of 'Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam' (2013) and several other books including 'The Changing Face of Empire: Special Ops, Drones, Spies, Proxy Fighters, Secret Bases, and Cyber Warfare' (2012) and 'The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives' (2008).  Christian Parenti, is a professor of sustainable development at the School for International Training, Graduate Institute. He a Nation contributing editor and the author of Lockdown America The Soft Cage, The Freedom: Shadows and Hallucinations in Occupied Iraq and most recently Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (Nation Books, July 2011). He has a Ph.D. in geogrphy and sociology from the London School of Economics.  Michael Rakowitz is an Iraqi-Amaerican artist and Northwestern University professor whose work addresses complex political and social issues through personal and intimate means. His works, such as paraSite, Return, The invisible enemy should not exist, Enemy Kitchen, and others have grappled with issues of poverty, political conflict, the Iraq War, popular culture, and personal narrative. Suraia Sahar was born in Kabul, Afghanistan during the Soviet Occupation and left as a refugee in the late 1980’s. She briefly lived in India before moving to Toronto, Canada where she was raised. She comes from a military family which has been an influence during her upbringing. She was a cofounder of Afghans for Peace (AFP), and is a current cofounder of Afghans United for Justice.  Suraia has spoken out against the war since the US-led invasion and is actively involved in mobilizing the Afghan community both in Toronto and abroad against the NATO-led occupation and war. She has spoken at anti-war events across North America. PLENARY DETAILS: WHAT: 21st Century American Militarism: Occupation Abroad and Resistance at Home - Plenary Panel of IVAW National Convention with Guest Speakers Christain Parenti, Michael Rakowitz, Suraia Sahar, Nick Turse, & More!  WHEN: Friday, August 2nd, 7pm DONATION: $10 Suggested Donation ( No one turned away) LINKS: www.ivaw.org www.christianparenti.com www.michaelrakowitz.com www.afghansunitedforjustice.org www.nickturse.com ENDORSING ORGANIZATIONS: Afghans United for Justice, American Friends Service Committee, Anti-War Committee- Chicago, Catalyst Project, Center for Constitutional Rights, Chicago Area Peace Action, Chicago Committee to Defend the Bill of Rights, Chicago Cuba Committee, Chicago Grey Panthers, Civilian-Soldier Alliance, Committee for a Just Peace in Israel and Palestine, Four Star Anarchist Organization, Fox Valley Citizens for Peace and Justice, Gay Liberation Network, Haymarket Press, Illinois Coalition Against Torture, Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project, Labor Beat/Labor Express, Mental Health Movement, Military Law Task Force, National Nurses United, National Writers Union, Near West Citizens for Peace and Justice, Peace Action - National, PM Press, Radical Public Health, Third Unitarian Church Social Action Committee, Unity Temple Congregati[...]



Plastic and War?

Sat, 01 Sep 2012 21:06:17 +0000

Posted to: 
Minutes Date: 
Saturday, September 1, 2012
We could not exist as we do without the oil byproduct that is plastic. Almost everything that we interact with every moment of every day, is made of plastic or has plastic in it, on it, or is part of it in some way. Just look at hospital sanitation. Take syringes for example. First off, they are mostly made of plastic and are durable because of that, but more importantly, they are individually wrapped in plastic that is keeping all contagious from getting to it in any form of interaction what so ever. That's pretty awesome and something that we wouldn't be able to live without if we plan on health continuing to be as important as it is. My point being that we need oil and the uses of it, but no means do we need to use it as much as we do. There's even some plastic alternatives that are made from a type of plant resin. Personally, I think that's cool as $#!+. We as a civilisation need to stop, step back, take a real good long look, and realise just how absolutely amazing oil is and stop taking it for granted by putting such ridiculous monetary value on it for the sole purpose of gaining wealth. That's what starts wars people. It's never about spreading good ideals or ideas. It's always about monetary gain and it always has been. Just a thought, Luc Baillargeon



Plastic and War?

Sat, 01 Sep 2012 21:06:02 +0000

Posted to: 
Minutes Date: 
Saturday, September 1, 2012
We could not exist as we do without the oil byproduct that is plastic. Almost everything that we interact with every moment of every day, is made of plastic or has plastic in it, on it, or is part of it in some way. Just look at hospital sanitation. Take syringes for example. First off, they are mostly made of plastic and are durable because of that, but more importantly, they are individually wrapped in plastic that is keeping all contagious from getting to it in any form of interaction what so ever. That's pretty awesome and something that we wouldn't be able to live without if we plan on health continuing to be as important as it is. My point being that we need oil and the uses of it, but no means do we need to use it as much as we do. There's even some plastic alternatives that are made from a type of plant resin. Personally, I think that's cool as $#!+. We as a civilisation need to stop, step back, take a real good long look, and realise just how absolutely amazing oil is and stop taking it for granted by putting such ridiculous monetary value on it for the sole purpose of gaining wealth. That's what starts wars people. It's never about spreading good ideals or ideas. It's always about monetary gain and it always has been. Just a thought, Luc Baillargeon



The Progression of Complacency

Sat, 01 Sep 2012 11:48:53 +0000

Posted to: 
Minutes Date: 
Saturday, September 1, 2012
I've learned that the worlds problems and flaws are much bigger and much more important than my own. I like to give people a different option.  The option to see and learn the other side of the story that for the most part is ignored and underrepresented because its doesn't get the same ratings as other news, stories, or media and therefore doesn't make as much money. The result being that HUGE national and even global issues aren't giving the attention they so desperately need. That of course lowers awareness to a point where even problems like global warming become a myth to some and in the end this continuously repeated process imperceptibly gives, without fail,birth to the typical complacent American citizen.  The very same citizens that believed that there were "Weapons of Mass Destruction" in Iraq after being told by the people they voted in to SERVE this country.  I think that people forgot the meaning of "serve", but thats a different issue altogether. My point is that people are losing sight of what's important and needs to be worked on in the world to better the LONG TERM effects opposed to the short term solutions that give instant gratification like an addict wants, but those quick fixes just prolong or even at times worsen the bigger problem.  This all because of the simple fact that the other half of the story is hiding behind all the other "popular news".  Now granted, this isn't the case in all dilemmas or solutions.  It it is however the truth for enough in order to say "too many" and if given an honest thought and close look, most will agree.  Just a thought, Luc Baillargeon   



The Progression of Complacency

Sat, 01 Sep 2012 11:48:25 +0000

Posted to: 
Minutes Date: 
Saturday, September 1, 2012
I've learned that the worlds problems and flaws are much bigger and much more important than my own. I like to give people a different option.  The option to see and learn the other side of the story that for the most part is ignored and underrepresented because its doesn't get the same ratings as other news, stories, or media and therefore doesn't make as much money. The result being that HUGE national and even global issues aren't giving the attention they so desperately need. That of course lowers awareness to a point where even problems like global warming become a myth to some and in the end this continuously repeated process imperceptibly gives, without fail,birth to the typical complacent American citizen.  The very same citizens that believed that there were "Weapons of Mass Destruction" in Iraq after being told by the people they voted in to SERVE this country.  I think that people forgot the meaning of "serve", but thats a different issue altogether. My point is that people are losing sight of what's important and needs to be worked on in the world to better the LONG TERM effects opposed to the short term solutions that give instant gratification like an addict wants, but those quick fixes just prolong or even at times worsen the bigger problem.  This all because of the simple fact that the other half of the story is hiding behind all the other "popular news".  Now granted, this isn't the case in all dilemmas or solutions.  It it is however the truth for enough in order to say "too many" and if given an honest thought and close look, most will agree.  Just a thought, Luc Baillargeon   



NYC, how could you of forgotten?!

Tue, 21 Aug 2012 06:50:04 +0000

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The NYPD and the NYFD were the light in a cloud of darkness, the beat of valor's heart, the earliest sign of healing even before the pain truly began, and that is something that no man, woman, or child can ever argue.  It breaks my heart, mind, and soul to see and hear that NYC seems to not FULLY understand that the tragedy didn't end in New York City or on 9/11.      When I moved here to NYC August 15th 2011, I had no idea of how I would soon find the missing and forgotten memories of the men and women sent abroad to seek revenge in the name of Americas blind, stumbling, anger.  As we struggled to just breath from such a hard blow, with blurred vision from the still falling tears, a poorly planned, weakly thought out counter strike was immediately implemented and if it wasn't the most off balanced, sloppy form, embarrassment of a swing back the nation had made. The desperation oozed from American leaders as they scrambled to figure out what they were even trying to hit and  aiming for.      The lives of our military that were lost during this time of frantic retaliation should also be remembered just as strongly as the sacrifices the NYPD and NYFD made on 9/11. That tragedy lasted much longer than that one day and it grew to an area much bigger than Ground Zero!!! We can NOT forget the consequences of OUR imitate actions!!! Wtf New York?! Why must we glorify and only grieve the hit we took to the teeth and then act as if we didn't swing back resulting in the disrespect from officers and civilians alike and the eventual taking for granted your military and veterans.  Sure we'll all say "thank you for your service.",but what about the f***ING sacrifice?!?!  Do you really even begin to understand the permanent mental scaring and having to deal and live with it and yourself every day?! And I'm lucky.  I made it home... alive.  Go leave a flower on a memorial if you really care and are thankful that someone who made The Ultimate Sacrifice so that you, your father, son, brother, cousin, didn't have to be put into a situation were they would even have to think of dying.         I don't think we veterans should get more respect than police officers or firefighters. I just think the NYPD's and the NYFD's sacrifices and heroism should NOT be revered anymore so than the same selfless acts and loses of the men and women of United States military.  Thank You and Semper Fi, Luc Baillargeon



NYC Home of "Ground Zero"- Treatment Towards Veterans?

Tue, 21 Aug 2012 03:58:04 +0000

I've lived from coast to coast and visited most of the in-between. I've come to notice quite the pronounced difference in how I've been looked at and treated from state to state, once my war veteran status was known. Oddly enough, I have come to find that the worst I've been treated by police and civilian alike, believe it or not, out of all places is New York City. YES, NYC!!! The very place where it all started. The home of "Ground Zero". I don't know about you, but that is something worth taking a good look at.



Operation Recovery: Women Veterans Speak Out

Fri, 22 Jul 2011 15:30:42 +0000

Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW)

Operation Recovery: Women in the Military

Women veterans and members of IVAW will speak to the service and sacrifices of women in the military, the hardships women encounter, and the ways we perceiver. We will talk about the affects of war and trauma and how IVAW is working through Operation Recovery for service members' and vets' right to heal.  

Friday November 11th 3:00pm-4:15pm

Marygrove College

8425 W. McNichols, Detroit, MI 48221

Library Lecture Hall

2nd Floor Liberal Arts Building

Light refreshments will be served following the program

Maggie Martin

maggiemartin@ivaw.org

912-596-8484