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The LawDog Files

Last Build Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2018 11:19:30 +0000


Meditations on death

Sat, 10 Mar 2018 21:06:00 +0000

Part of my personal belief system is the certainty that the time of each of our deaths was written when we were born; and can not be changed.

Where you die, whom you die with, those can all be changed to a greater or lesser degree. 

How you die and what you die for ... ah.

This I learned from my father long before Herger the Joyous lectured about death and fear on the silver screen.

Understand that when it is time for you to die, you are going to die.  Whether you believe -- as I do -- that your time was written, or you believe that we are only allotted a certain number of breaths or heartbeats, or you believe that the gods blink, and the lights go out ... you are going to die sometime.

You cannot change this.

You can, however, change how you die, or what you die for.  You can change what your death is for.

When your time to die comes up, and there's some critter standing there with a box-cutter, or a hammer, or an AR-15 -- understand that if it is your time, you are going to die shot in the back, or you are going to die getting trampled by panicked fellow citizens, or you are going to die from a stress-induced heart-attack ... but it is your time, and you are going to die.

It is far better to die screaming your defiance and beating a critter's head in, than to die cowering in a dark closet, with the smell of piddle and vomit filling your nostrils.

This is true for men; it is true for women, for high-school students --

-- and it is doubly true for those who swore an oath to protect their fellow citizens.

If you so fear death that you are unable to change how you meet death -- you need to re-evaluate your life.

And if you are a peace officer, and you aren't prepared to die well ... not only should you re-evaluate your life, but you need to turn in your badge and seek employment doing something else.

When violence comes, and brings your death with it -- die well, for that is the only thing you can change about your death.



Sat, 24 Feb 2018 18:27:00 +0000

We have learned that not only did the School Resource Office (a trained deputy sheriff) not enter the active shooter scene at the recent Florida shooting, but three or so Broward County Deputies were also waiting behind cars outside.

Words cannot describe how sickened I am about this.

In 1999, the shootings at Columbine High School forced a seminal change in the law enforcement response to active shooter scenes.

Prior to 1999 the standard response was to surround and contain the shooter, while waiting for SWAT to arrive.

This changed after Columbine.  Some agencies state that the first four officers on scene will enter and engage the shooter.  Some will do it with the first two.  Still others have the first responding officer do the entry.

Regardless of the number, the response is always the same -- make entry and Old Yeller the critter ASAP.

Columbine -- the genesis for this policy -- was nineteen years (19) ago.  There is no excuse for any peace officer in the United States to not know that the best way to deal with an active shooter is to get in there, find him, and stop him.  No excuse.  None.

In 2006 -- 12 years ago.  Bloody hell -- I banged off a thought about bright lines in which I opined that every adult should sit down and decide where the line was at which point they would use Deadly Force against another mother's son.

My opinion on this matter goes double -- a hundred-fold -- for those who put on a badge.  Before you get out of the Academy you should have decided where that bright line was.

And I'm here to tell you:  if that bright line isn't on the proper side of "shooting up a school full of kids" then don't you dare pin on that badge.

I'll go so far as to say that there is no dishonour in turning in your badge after the Academy if you realize that you can't walk into an on-going gunfight and shoot the critter pulling the trigger in the face until he changes shape or catches fire -- as long as you do it before the actual bullets start going "bang".

If you come to me -- or your boss -- on a quiet afternoon and say, "I've thought about it, and I don't think I can do the needful to save kids" then all honour to you, and I wish you peace and happiness in another profession.

But if you wait until the bangs and the stinks and the screams are in progress to decide that you just can't do it ... you, sir, are a useless oath-breaking bucket of squid chum, who is parasitising a position, a uniform, and a salary that could be held by someone who can do the needful.

And -- quite frankly -- if you wear a badge, and you hide behind a car while children under your protection are getting killed, you should have the common [deleted] decency to take your sidearm, find a quiet country road somewhere, and Do The Proper Thing.

Nothing but the back of my hand to you -- all of you.



Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:29:00 +0000

We're back from the Life, the Universe, and Everything symposium (for brevity's sake:  LTUE), and I've had a bit of time to digest the experience.

In one word:  wow.

My only previous writing convention has been LibertyCon -- twice -- so my actual con experience is rather limited; together with my screaming introversion had me fairly twitchy about attending.

I needn't have worried.  LTUE is a bigger version of LibertyCon, differing only in that LTUE tends to focus a little more on the nuts-and-bolts of writing, but with the same laid-back, small approach to the thing.

And a group of LibertyCon regulars who saw us come in, and waved us over. That sort of thing will give you the warm fuzzies.

Most of the time there were two -- or more -- panels that I really wanted to attend, but they were being presented in the same time period.  And in the few times that there was a period in which there was only one panel I wanted to see ... it was either standing room only, or the room was too full, and they'd shut the doors.

All-in-all, a good problem to have for a literary convention.

Speaking of panels, one that I particularly wanted to see had Larry Correia and several other authors on it.  As the doors shut, it was rather noticeable that Larry was the only speaker up there.  The others never showed.

So, there's my buddy up there, talking about how there's another author in the room, an author who could help him out ... and I realize he's looking right at me.

Now, for someone with a full Murderhobo Beard™, the International Lord of Hate has some really big puppy-dog eyes.  Almost pitiful, really.

And then I noticed that I was moving up the the table and sitting down.

Fortunately, I hadn't wrapped my tongue too far around my eyeteeth when J.L. Curtis and Peter Grant showed up, and were immediately drafted.

I'm not sure that the panel we produced was what the con had intended, but we did our best -- and I found myself actually having fun.

Herself  and I have been hugged (Sarah Hoyt and the Lovely Mrs Correia™ give the best hugs), and fed, and hugged, and chided, and hugged.

I finally managed to give Brad Torgersen one of my books. I shook hands with L. E. Modesitt -- with-out looking like too much of an idiot (I hope). I had breakfast with the Hoyts. I watched a intense children's doctor go through costume changes as he gave a first-class presentation on abuse. I drank really good whisky and swapped stories. I ate world-class BBQ.  I met more really good people than I can count.

I relaxed.

It was a good weekend.  Herself and I will definitely be back.

Now, I'm going to hide in my dark house and sleep for a week.



Wed, 21 Feb 2018 23:28:00 +0000

Someone just e-mailed me the "Gun Rights Cake" analogy, exclaiming that I needed to read it.

No, I really don't.

Man, if I had a nickle for every time that piece of my work was e-mailed, Facebooked, or Twitted without attribution, I'd be one of the wealthiest men in Texas.

I don't mind it getting passed around -- I am kind of proud of it -- but I'm getting bloody annoyed by the sheer number of folks hinting -- if not out-right stating -- that they were the ones who came up with it.

I wrote it eight years ago in this post. Not any "Bentley", or "Robert", or "Rupert".

I re-wrote it three years later here.




Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:13:00 +0000

Herself and I are about to head out on our first leg of the trip for the Life, The Universe, and Everything Symposium.

This should be ... interesting.

While we're gone, here's the complete audio of the Armadillo Story from The LawDog Files:

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Enjoy, and we'll see you when we get back!


Smoked by Johnny 5

Sat, 03 Feb 2018 18:00:00 +0000

At breakfast this morning we learned that a Dallas Grand Jury has no-billed the Dallas PD officers who used a robot and some C4 to blow a gunman straight to hell.


By way of Lady Tam, we also learned of a fascinating read about that particular dust-up. Long read, and somewhat harrowing, but worth it.


Graphic novel?

Wed, 24 Jan 2018 02:01:00 +0000

Just out of curiosity, what would my Gentle Readers feel about The LawDog Files being rendered as a graphic novel?

I ask, because the publisher of my little scribblings has started a one week contest to produce one or more graphic novels from a list of titles.

The idea being that you donate money to the project -- the more money you donate, the more bennies you get -- and those who donate money will vote on which title from the list will become a graphic novel.

While my first book is on the list, any of the books there would be a fantastic as a comic book.

If you're interested, pop over and take a look.


And audiobook is live!

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 04:00:00 +0000

A bit of a surprise, but apparently the audio book of the first book is live!

Oh, wow.


Ten years ago

Sun, 17 Dec 2017 18:49:00 +0000

Trans-Siberian Orchestra recorded this video.  It has become something of a tradition here at The LawDog Files to play it when we finally accept that it's the Yule Season.


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Happy Holidays, Gentle Readers.


Busy, busy, busy

Sun, 10 Dec 2017 16:51:00 +0000


Both books -- The LawDog Files, and The LawDog Files:  African Adventures -- are now available in both digital editions and print editions.

As a Christmas gift for blowing my mind on book sales, if you will send an e-mail to:


 -- take the vertical lines out of the address, please (Death To Spambots!) -- with the name of the person to whom you wish to dedicate the book, any message you'd like, and a mailing address, I'll send you a signed bookplate to put in the book.

I'll do this for emails I get through December 31.

Audiobook versions of both are in the works, further details as things progress.

More in a bit.


Anthology is live

Sat, 28 Oct 2017 18:46:00 +0000

My story -- "By Hook And Crook" -- is in Calexit - The Anthology, which has gone live on Kindle (see the link) or dead tree edition.

It's my first ever anthology, so I'm a little stoked.

Good bunch of authors.  Good stories.

Now back to my zombie short story that keeps trying to become a novella.  Bad story!  Bad, bad story!

After that, the Rural Fiction.  Busy, busy, busy.


Gun Raffle!

Sat, 28 Oct 2017 01:09:00 +0000

I know this is a lousy time to ask for money, but one of our extended family is in need. FarmFam’s daughter-in-law, Andi, 33 and the mother of two small boys, suffered a stroke in mid August. Unfortunately, it wasn't diagnosed correctly for two weeks, delaying treatment.

She's facing a year to 18 months of physical therapy to get back to full function.

Therapy costs are running $200-500 per session, and she needs therapy once a week. Andi has not been able to afford health insurance, because she her husband own a small business that makes too much money for them to get assistance with health insurance, but not enough for them to be able to afford health insurance, and raising two boys.

Any help will be much appreciated, as Andi has begun physical therapy, and without health insurance she has to pay the full cost of every session.

In order to help her out, we are doing another gun raffle to try to help her with her therapy. One change from what we did for Tam is to run this through a Go Fund Me,, so that the money is immediately available to her for her therapy. One IRS change is that Go Fund Me $$ are now counted as income for the family, so we are shooting for a goal of $25,000 to offset the tax burden they will be hit with.

Here are the ‘rules’ $10 per chance, $50/6 chances, $100/12 chances, etc. Make your donation to the Go Fund Me above, and copy your donation receipt to This will count as your entry into the raffle. If you have already donated, we will accept prior donations to the Go Fund Me.

The raffle will run from now through the end of November, with the drawing to be held 1 December via a random drawing program. First number gets their choice, second gets their choice, etc.

The raffle packages are:

  1. Taurus .44 Magnum pistol
  2. Ruger MK-II bull barrel .22
  3. Custom sub-MOA AR-15
  4. Remington 870 pump in 20ga
  5. Chinese copy of a 12ga coach gun
  6. Springfield Range Officer .45 with 7 magazines and custom holster
  7. Springfield Range Officer 9mm with 7 magazines and custom holster
  8. LawDog’s personal Rock Island 1911 9mm, reworked by Joe Speer with 6 magazines
  9. A ladies package consisting of a ring (late-Victorian-style design with either high-quality glass or mid-grade garnet stones. The mount is jeweler's metal, size 6 3/4 or 7). A unicorn necklace, late 1980s-early 1990s James Avery sterling silver charm on a silver chain. A coin necklace, an 1904 Indian Head penny, silver dipped in a gold-plated mount with a gold-plated silver chain. And a handmade necklace and earrings from Phlegmmy.
  10. Signed copies of LawDog’s, Peter Grant’s, Dorothy Grant’s, and JL Curtis’ books
  11. TBD (other possible packages are being discussed)

All guns will be shipped FFL to FFL for winners. Pictures of the various packages will follow in the next couple of days.

Thank you in advance, I know she will appreciate the help, and this will take a little pressure off the family!


"Gun Rights Cake" Analogy

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 01:11:00 +0000


I first wrote the "Gun Rights Cake" analogy on this page in 2010.  I re-posted it here three years later.

Later on, a Facebook group called "The Hypocrisy and Stupidity of Gun Control Advocates" put in cartoon form:

Note the proper attribution at the bottom of that cartoon.

With the events of Las Vegas, I'm seeing my own work coming across my Facebook feed and my e-mail -- only my name appears to have become "Bentley", or "Robert", or "Rupert". 

Goodness, my parents would be startled.

One gentleman -- when gently corrected -- stated that I actually stole that analogy from "someone" on

Bedamned, I most assuredly did not steal that analogy from anyone else.  I bloody well wrote the sodding thing. 

And by-the-by:  whomever added the extra language about the "Dick Act of 1902" in one of the versions that's going around -- if I'd've wanted that in my analogy, I would have added it. Keep your meat-hooks off of my work, if you please.

Gentle Readers, if someone sends you my analogy, uncredited -- or claimed by someone other than LawDog -- please gently correct that person.  Likewise, if one of the cartoons comes by you with the attribution clipped off of the bottom.

You can point them to this post, if you'd like.



Oh, look.

Wed, 04 Oct 2017 00:42:00 +0000


My first anthology!

Looks like about three weeks, give or take.


Green chili stew

Tue, 03 Oct 2017 22:47:00 +0000

Ah, autumn.

2 pounds of pork
1 big white onion
1 tablespoon of Squeeze Garlic
2 tubs of Knorr Swiss Chicken In A Tub
6 cups water
1 pound red taters
1 to 2 cups (ish) of roasted, peeled, and chopped Hatch chilies*
1 tablespoon Chipotle Topper
Salt and pepper to taste.
(If cilantro doesn't taste like soap to you, chop some of that.)

Get out your big stew pot, cut your pork into one-inch cubes, and toss it into the pot on Medium-High with some oil.  Chop your onion, bung it in there, too, and brown the pork.

Once the pork is brown, run the heat down to Medium, drain the oil, and toss in the garlic.  Give it some stirs until you start to smell that lovely nutty aroma, add the water, and bump the heat back up to Medium-High.

While you're waiting for the boil, chunk your taters into 3/4(-ish) inch bits.  When you get a rolling boil, throw in the taters and both the tubs of chicken.  Chop the heat down, and let it all simmer for about an hour, or until the spuds are cooked.

Once that's done, throw in the Hatch chilies*, and the Chipotle Topper.  Simmer for about another 15 minutes.

(Now is the time to stir in the cilantro, if you like, but not for me.  Stuff tastes like diswashing detergent.)

Serve over rice, with a salad.


*Please be advised:  Hatch chilies come in two heat levels.  Mild, and Spiky.  If you send someone to the market for some freshly roasted Hatch chilies, and they're not aware of this little fact, they may come back with some Spiky ones.  Damned fine flavour, but if your guests are expecting the Mild chilies -- because Mild ones are all they've ever gotten from your kitchen -- and get a mouthful of Spiky chilies, there may be startled exclamations.  Forewarned is forearmed.

Meditations on crowds

Tue, 03 Oct 2017 04:38:00 +0000

By nature, by profession, and by training I bloody well hate crowds.A man I admired once informed me that the IQ of a crowd could be ascertained by taking the lowest IQ of any single person in the crowd, and dividing that by the number of people in the crowd.For myself, I always think of a crowd as one large, dumb, and happy organism ... right up until something decides to take a thunder run at the crowd, and it becomes a large, dumb, and dangerous organism.Unfortunately, it is a Fact of Life that, upon occasion, crowds must be endured.And while there are several types of dangerous crowds, and several ways in which a crowd presents a danger, the focus of today's musing is confined to that crowd phenomenon called the "crush" or the "stampede".A "crush" is when a crowd takes it into its' multiple little mind that Something Bad Has Happened, and decides to unarse the A.O.There are two things that should be noted here.  1) 90+% of all deaths resulting from a panicked crowd are from traumatic asphyxia or compression asphyxia; and 2) The majority of the victims of compression asphyxia will have died standing up.The obvious question is:  "LawDog, what is 'compression asphyxia'?"Glad you asked.When you get a large mass of dumb and panicked suddenly moving in one direction, Dumb and Panicked tends to bring a lot of force to the dance.  How much force?  At several scenes where fatal "crush" events have taken place, After Action Reviews of the incidents have revealed steel railings bent and deformed by nothing more than the press of multiple bodies.  In at least one (the 1979 The Who concert stampede.  I think)  recreations of the accident show a horizontal application of force equaling about one thousand (1000) pounds.One half of a ton of force, plus or minus, applied sideways.It takes far less than that to compress the rib-cage of a normal human being to the point that they can no longer inhale.  Without the ability to draw air into your lungs, unconsciousness sets in at ten to forty seconds, brain damage starts at about four minutes, and death follows fairly quickly after that."Traumatic asphyxia" or "compression asphyxia" is what happens when a squishy person gets between an immovable object -- such as a wall -- and the irresistible force of a mass of a panicked crowd.So.  How to avoid this?First off, stay away from crowds.  If you can't avoid that, stay away from crowds in confined spaces -- and by "confined space" I mean any place with more walls around the area than open air.However, if you find yourself having to be in a confined space with a crowd, I'd like you to keep at least two things in mind:1)  Crowds are made up of people.  And people are creatures of habit.  One of those irritating little habits is that people want to go out of an area the same way that they came in.  And that goes double when they're panicked.When things go agley, and The Crowd decides that it's Time To Be Somewhere Else, The Crowd will escape the area the same way it came in.  Only a lot faster, and damn the torpedoes.That means that if 99% of The Crowd came into the dance venue by way of those two double doors right there, unless there's A Damned Fine Reason preventing such, when the crush happens, The Crowd is going to go right out those two double doors right there.  At full, berserk speed.  And they will do their damnedest to fit the entire Fire Marshal's Maximum Occupancy Number into that one doorway, all at the same time.So, the best way to avoid this crunchy, sticky mess is to exercise some of that Situational Awareness when you first ente[...]

Quick-and-dirty chili

Thu, 24 Aug 2017 03:37:00 +0000

If tongue-scorching heat is your thing, this recipe probably isn't for you; but if you'd like a mild little chili that's done in less than an hour, you might give this one a try.


2 pounds chili-ground lean beef, or venison. (Hamburger meat will do, lean.)
1 pound mild Italian sausage
1 medium-to-large yellow onion
6 cloves of garlic
1 Chipotle cube
3 teaspoons(ish) chili powder (if you're not mad at Penzeys, sub in 1 teaspoon(ish) of their Chili 9000 for one of the regular chili powder)
1/2 teaspoon smoked salt
1 can Rotel Fire-Roasted tomatoes & chilies
1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes
1 14.5 oz can diced tomatoes (I prefer fire-roasted, but up to you)
1 small can Hatch diced mild green chilies
Glug or so of a decent red table wine

Dice your onion, toss it into a frying pan, bung in your meat, and brown the whole mess.  Drain off any grease, and dump into your chili pot.

Mince your garlic cloves, and drop them in.  (I use squeeze garlic, but I'm lazy.)  Put the chipotle cube into a bowl, and mush it into powder, add your chili powder and the smoked salt, muddle the mix a bit with a spoon, and toss it into the pot.

Stir in the Rotel, all of the other tomato, and the chilies.  Simmer for about twenty minutes, glug in the wine, stir, simmer another ten minutes (plus or minus), then serve with shredded Mexican cheese mix and crackers.

Voila!  Quick and dirty chili.

(Again, if you're looking for a spicy chili, this isn't for you.  However, if you're not sure of the heat tolerance of your dinner guests, and don't have all day to simmer a proper chili, this might do you.)


Support starving authors!

Thu, 24 Aug 2017 02:51:00 +0000

Friend Peter has a new book out.

This time he's trying his hand at fantasy.

If that's your thing, you might have a go at it.


And Voltaire wept

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 23:05:00 +0000

"I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it"~ Evelyn Beatrice Hall, in "The Friends of Voltaire".As a man of fifty-plus years on this little green dirtball -- and a significant portion of that life outside of the United States -- I'm accustomed to thinking that if I haven't seen it all, I've seen enough to be able to handle the rest.That was until recently, when the sheer number of folks calling for outright bans on the right to free speech -- and especially folks who should bloody well know better -- hit epidemic proportions.Gentle Readers, free speech is messy.  It is ugly, precisely because free speech that everyone agrees with does not require protections.  Why would you protect speech that upsets no-one?  Why would you need to?Even worse is the call for the government to declare that certain speech is "hate speech" -- because getting the government involved always works out so well -- and to give the government (and the flawed, flawed humans who make up that government) the power to declare bans on certain speech.To put it in simple language even a college student can understand:Do you really want President Mike Pence deciding what is protected speech, and what speech should be banned?Because that is what you're going to get in the future.How about President Greg Abbott after Mission Creep gets into the mix? How would you feel about President Ted Cruz deciding what speech you should go to jail for?That, ladies and gentlemen, is exactly what you're setting yourself up for when you start yick-yacking about the government banning speech."But, LawDog," I hear you snivelling, "Some speech is an incitement to violence, and should be against the law."You know what?  Let's look at that.I have heard folks chanting, "What do we want?  Dead cops!  When do we want it?  Now!" rather recently.  About me, and those like me.Is that not an incitement to violence?  Ask Dallas PD, and their dead brothers.  Should it not be "against the law"?No.  It is protected by the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States.I can show any number of YouTube videos of imams calling for jihad, for the slaughter of Westerners, for the genocide of an entire people.Is this not an incitement to violence?  Ask the dead in San Bernadino, at Ft Hood, at Orlando, at the Boston Marathon.  Should it not be "against the law"?No.  It is protected by the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States."But, LawDog, Nazi-related speech is banned in Germany!"I don't give two hoots in hell about how they do things in Germany.  You like their restriction on free speech -- move.  Delta is ready when you are. Scram.So.  To break it down Barney-style:  your calls to ban speech -- even Nazi speech -- is un-American.  And once you've begged government to pass that first law banning speech, it's a simple amendment to expand those bans.  Think about the absolute worst politician you can think of in the White House.  Worse than Trump -- because they're out there, and they've got as good a chance at the Oval Office as Donald J. Trump had -- think about that politician being able to amend a law banning speech.The wearing of the burqa is a free speech issue.  Think there isn't a politician out there somewhere that would love to ban the wearing of the burqa?  Just one little quiet midnight amendment to an already existing law you're trying to give to government.Pro-choice?  How's that work out when free speec[...]

Book, the Second

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 03:16:00 +0000

Well, the second LawDog Files book (Africa and other stories) goes live tomorrow.

I think most of my Gentle Readers will be happy to discover that there are some Africa stories in there that have never graced the pages of this blog.

Then I think I'll go catatonic for a bit, because pounding that one out so quickly was one ... interesting ... experience.

It'll have to be a short spell of not thinking, because I've got a short story due for a zombie anthology, another short story for a mil-sci anthology; and I'm going to dabble my fingers in the world of self-publishing with a Rural Fantasy book that's been kicking it's way around my brain for a while.

For now, though, I'm going to turn off my brain and sleep for a bit.


Wow. That was ...

Wed, 26 Jul 2017 00:58:00 +0000

... quicker than I expected.

The dead-tree edition of The LawDog Files just went up on Amazon.


Let's see if this "pre-order" ...

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 22:40:00 +0000

... thing works.

Allegedly, if you click on this link, you will be taken to Amazon where you may "pre-order" the next book.

I remain suspicious -- as always -- of technology.


Sneak peek

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 15:47:00 +0000

... shh.  Don't tell anyone.


Holy dancing two-toed sloths!

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 22:16:00 +0000

That, ladies and gentlemen, was one of the most thrill-inducing rides of my life.

I seriously expected to make it into the top 1000 on Amazon Kindle, and when I went to bed at 1009 Paid in Kindle Store, I was perfectly content and happy.

Then Larry Correia dealed himself and his fans into it.

Oh, my dear and fuzzy gods.

When I finally went to bed, my little scribbles were at #87.  I am informed that they got up to #82 in the wee hours.

There has been much hyperventilation on my part.

Thank you, my friends.  I knew that my little brain-droppings were popular to a small segment of the Internet, but I honestly didn't think they'd have much appeal outside of my regular Gentle Readers.

I've been somewhat cured of that misunderstanding.

And I'd especially like to thank Peter Grant, Dorothy Grant, Jim Curtis, Larry Correia, and all of Larry's fans.

If you'd like to thank them for dragging me kicking and screaming into writing books, well, nothing says "Hey, thanks" like buying their books.

Of course, the biggest "Thank you" goes to the lady the book is dedicated to.


Okay.  News, since y'all seem to be interested.

The next LawDog Files will be out somewhat quicker than I had thought -- I'm collating and editing it now.

The dead-tree copy is due by mid-August; and I wonder if y'all would be interested in an audio-book?


And here ... we ... go!

Mon, 17 Jul 2017 09:30:00 +0000


Ok, Gentle Readers, here it is:  The LawDog Files, The Book.

I hope y'all find that it was worth the wait.  The print edition will be out in the middle of August.  Herself maintains that signed copies are vitally important, so we've got some adhesive ex libris plates coming in.  If you see me at a signing before the dead-tree edition drops, I'll happily sign one of those (if you'd like) so that you may add it to your physical book later.

I am collating the second book -- which will be Africa stories and random stories that don't fit anywhere else -- and hope to have it off to the publisher by October at the latest.

Enjoy!  Herself and I are off to quiet places far from cell-phone coverage, so we'll check in very late tonight.

Mildly freaking out, I remain: