Subscribe: SF Site -- June 2005
http://www.sfsite.com/depts/rssfeed0506.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
begins  great  movie  revenge sith  revenge  rick  robert  science fiction  ship  star wars  star  stories  story  time  wars  world 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: SF Site -- June 2005

SF Site -- June 2005



The new issue of the SF Site is now online.



Copyright: Copyright 1996-2010 SF Site
 



Paradox by John Meaney

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The populace lives underground, in vast cavern complexes whose layers reflect (and effect) social position: the nobles in the Primum Stratum, the underclasses in the bottom strata, with many shades and nuances in between. This rigidly classist culture is dominated by the Oracles, men and women who are able to cast their consciousness up and down the time stream and thus unerringly predict the future. Despite its stagnant and archaic social structure, Nulapeiron's is an extremely advanced society, with technology that borders on the magical.



Godplayers by Damien Broderick

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The novel follows a young man from Australia named August Seebeck. His parents disappeared, presumed dead, when he was a boy, and he was raised by relatives, in particular his Aunt Miriam and later his Great-Aunt Tansy. He comes home to Tansy's house after herding cattle in the outback, to find that she claims dead bodies have been showing up in her bathtub.



Haunted by Kelley Armstrong

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Eve Levine, Savannah's mother and a ghost, is being sent on a mission to track a Nix, a Germanic demi-demon nymph who feeds off chaos. This particular Nix has been jumping from woman to woman giving them the necessary drive to murder. The Nix feeds off the chaos and anguish these murders create. Eventually she grows weary of her partner and devises a way for them to be caught and create even more chaos.



Fourth Planet from the Sun edited by Gordon Van Gelder

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Mars orbits the sun at an average distance of 227.9 million kilometers with a period of about 22 1/2 earth months. Its bright red, potentially menacing glow early on linked the name of the planet to the gods of blood and war in numerous civilizations. With the publication in 1898 of H.G. Wells's novel, The War of the Worlds, Mars became inextricably linked in the public imagination with aliens and invasion.



Falling Into Heaven by L.H. Maynard and M.P.N. Sims

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The world is more inhabited with hopeless, lonely people than we care to admit most of the time. Every other person who passes us on the street is trying desperately to forget something too painful to carry around all their lives, someone they can never replace, some peace that cannot be theirs. In this collection there are ways around this suffering, but they seldom lead where we and the characters hope. And pain has many more forms than we imagine.



New Arrivals compiled by Neil Walsh

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Some of the newest books to arrive at the SF Site office include the latest from Steve Aylett, Gwyneth Jones, L.E. Modesitt Jr., Jane Lindskold, Chris Wooding, Charles Stross, and others.



Batman Begins

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Batman Begins is a major disappointment, a muddled mess. It begins with an hour-long origin story, which is almost identical to the origin story in the movie The Shadow -- not a great movie, but a better movie than this one.



The James Tiptree Award Anthology 1 edited by Karen Joy Fowler, Pat Murphy, Debbie Notkin, Jeffrey D. Smith

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The best thing about this anthology is "The Snow Queen," a fairy tale by Hans Christian Anderson newly translated by Diana Crone Frank and Jeffrey Frank. It is followed by two modern, Tiptree award-winning retellings of the story. "The Lady of the Ice Garden," by Kara Dalkey, is a Japanese retelling of the fable and Kelly Link's "Travels with the Snow Queen," a clever, post-modernist interpretation that uses the fable as a metaphor for the emotional upheaval of relationships and breakups.



The Severed Man by George Mann

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The fifth entry in the Time Hunter series sees time travellers Honore Lechasseur and Emily Blandish on the trail of two mysterious figures -- a small boy and a tramp. Lechasseur has the ability to perceive people's time-lines (or 'time-snakes' as he calls them here), and both these individuals have unusual ones. The boy's time-snake has no end or beginning; in contrast, the tramp's has been cut, so he exists only in the present.



Enter the Real Matrix: an interview with Jake Horsley

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

"Generally, the first step to unplugging is an overwhelming sense of disgust, despair, and contempt with life, the world, and everything. For many it begins at the home, with family members, possibly via "romantic" relationships, in which we begin to feel the terrible suffocating influence of other people's thoughts and expectations."



Heart of Whitenesse by Howard Waldrop

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

There is a school of thought that holds a short story should stand on its own, without benefit of a foreword or an afterword explanation. It's a debatable proposition that probably holds up well as an ideal critical standard, but like all rules it eventually must meet its exception. That exception is Howard Waldrop, whose stories stand up fine on their own, and then become even better after the author explains them.



Vox: SF For Your Ears: a column by Scott Danielson

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Scott Danielson is looking at audio SF -- on tape, on CD, on whatever. This time out, he is looking at podcasting. He has visited sites to find out how it works, where you can find some and where it is going.



Computer Viruses in Books: an interview with Mark Chadbourn

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

"Stories are the best way for transmitting ideas, because the ideas are put into a structure where they can sink deep into our subconscious, where memes do their work. One example that illustrates the power of stories to transmit memes is the TV series Hill Street Blues. Academic studies have noted police acted a certain way before the series was broadcast, and then subtly adjusted their behaviour, subconsciously, afterwards, so they acted more like the characters."



Mists of Everness by John C. Wright

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

When last we left our heroes, the forces of evil had descended upon Everness House, a portal between the dream world and ordinary human existence. The hearty band that had bravely tried to draw a "line in the sand" between the nightmare and the mundane is dispersed, and darkness is poised to envelope the world.



Fearful Symmetries by Thomas F. Monteleone

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The themes of the stories in this collection range widely from revenge, black magic, Lovecraftian monsters to stories of cruel wagers, obsessive fatherly love, sheer madness, sometimes with a gentle Twilight Zone touch, sometimes with a nasty taste.



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Rick offers his thoughts on seeing Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith for a second time. He also gives us some tips on why the DVD box set of Lois & Clark -- Season One is worth watching.



Was by Geoff Ryman

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

It is a novel woven from three main strands of narrative: the story of a girl named Dorothy who lives a sad and painful life in 19th-century Kansas and once made an impression on a young substitute teacher named Frank Baum; the story of Frances Gumm, whose difficult childhood forever haunted the persona she became when she changed her name to Judy Garland; and the story of Jonathan, an actor dying of AIDS who dreams of one day playing the Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz, and who, before he dies, traces Dorothy back to Kansas and Baum.



The Immortals by James Gunn

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

There are two fundamental propositions that give rise to works of science fiction. One is What if? as in: what if something new comes along that completely revises the paradigm of our existence? What if we discover life out there? What if it discovers us? The other is If this goes on... as in: suppose we logically extrapolate a trend in our current situation, where will it take us and our posterity?



Voices of Vision by Jayme Lynn Blaschke

Thu, 16 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

This collection of interviews run the gamut of the field, including authors and editors and comic book writers. From recently published authors such as Patricia Anthony to stalwarts of the field such as Jack Williamson, these interviews give a broad look, not just at the history of the field, but at the breadth of topics which can be covered, and the manner in which they can be covered, under the rubric of science fiction.



Close To My Heart: Robert Silverberg's Worlds of Wonder edited by Robert Silverberg

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

What made this book different, and made it the first anthology Matthew would read cover-to-cover, was the power of Silverberg's voice, the authority with which he expressed and justified his opinions, and the excellence of his selection. Thirteen stories are each followed by an essay in which the Silverberg explains why the story is a model of how to write science fiction.



The Well Of Stars by Robert Reed

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The novel continues the story of the Great Ship, first introduced in Marrow and Mere. The Great Ship is a fabulous creation, a spaceship so large that there is a planet hidden at its center. No one knows who built it. It was found and boarded by human beings, who, along with a host of other species, decided to take the ship on a ride right out of the Milky Way into an unknown part of space, the Inkwell Nebula.



The House of Storms by Ian R. MacLeod

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The discovery of the alchemical substance aether has ushered in an alternate Industrial Revolution based on magic rather than steam power; the "Age" that follows the events of The Light Ages, the author's previous novel, is a sort of late Victorian period in which Victrola phonographs exist not at all incongruously side-by-side with telephone systems capable of video transmission.



A Conversation With Caitlin Sweet

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

"Lloyd Alexander and Ursula K. Le Guin and Alan Garner really defined my sense of what fantasy can do. It can be profound and moral -- without moralizing -- and full of wonder."



The Engine of Recall by Karl Schroeder

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Canada has been the source of a great deal of intriguing SF over the past decade or so, much of it at least moderately "hard SF." Hugo and Nebula winner Robert J. Sawyer, Robert Charles Wilson, James Alan Gardner, Alison Sinclair, Julie E. Czerneda, Sean Stewart, and Cory Doctorow. One of the most rigorously "hard SF" writers to come out of this "Canadian Renaissance" is Karl Schroeder, author of the impressive novels Ventus and Permanence.



Revenge of the Sith: a movie review by Rick Norwood

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The last of the Star Wars movies is, sadly, also the least. It is certainly one of the most spectacular films ever made. But while it is often beautiful, it is never joyous; often exciting but never thrilling.



World Fantasy Awards compiled by Rodger Turner

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

The awards are presented at the banquet of the World Fantasy Convention held each year in late October -- early November. Two of the nominees on the final ballot are determined by readers while the remainder come from the ballots put together by a panel of judges who change annually. The judges select the recipients in a second round of voting. The awards are based on work done during the previous calendar year.



A Caress of Twilight by Laurel K. Hamilton

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

All of the main players from the first novel are back, with the exception of prince Cel, who is away being tortured for months on end as punishment for earlier indiscretions. Meredith, is now constantly accompanied by her band of immortal Sidhe warriors, all of whom she is required to take as lovers. Merry's lust filled nights have the aim of getting her pregnant, before the evil Cel is set free to either assassinate her, or produce a child of his own.



Brushing the Imagination: an interview with David A Hardy and Sir Patrick Moore

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

"I was equally into science and art, and about equally good at both. I must admit that it was often the more spectacular aspects of chemistry that attracted me: liquids that changed colour, crystals, explosions, sulphurous smells, clouds of smoke, brilliant flames. I went on to make my own fireworks and rockets, many of them good ones! I often think I could have been a pyro-technician."



The Rose of the World by Jude Fisher

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

On the world of Elda, the tumultuous events initiated by one fateful Allfair have triggered crisis, tragedy, and transformation. In the northern Eyran Isles, Katla Aranson, gifted metalsmith and incorrigible hoyden, has been abducted by marauders, along with all the women of Rockfall. Saro Vingo, who shares neither the zealotry nor the xenophobia common among his fellow Istrians, has come into possession of a deadly deathstone; in an effort to keep it out of the hands of religious fanatics, he has fled in company with the sorcerer Virelai.



Approaching Omega by Eric Brown

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Four humans are the maintenance crew on an outbound human ark escaping an Earth rapidly succumbing to anthropogenic destruction of the environment and of other humans. Despite warnings all seems good-to-go, but upon their first awakening from suspended animation, they find the ship heavily damaged, its central AI systems offline, some of the colonist-bearing pods destroyed, others hanging by a thread.



A Man in Shorts: an interview with Stephen Baxter

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

"If you're aspiring to write, a short story of twenty pages is a lot easier to visualise than a novel of five hundred pages, and a lot easier to study. But paradoxically it's just as hard in a different way. For me, it was a relatively low cost way in, and a way to learn the basics of fiction writing."



Star Wars, Episode III: Revenge of the Sith: a movie review by David Newbert

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

We were all looking forward to this, weren't we? Star Wars is a de facto cultural phenomenon now, so how could it be otherwise? Everyone, from impassioned fans who camped out for weeks in front of the wrong theater, to sneering detractors who saw the last two films as the backsliding of the franchise, have been waiting to see what George Lucas had up his sleeve for this final go-round.



Airborn by Kenneth Oppel

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

In an alternate Victorian world, Matt Cruse serves as a cabin boy on the luxury airship Aurora. He is on watch when a tattered hot air balloon crosses the ship's path. Matt succeeds in saving its severely injured passenger through nimble acrobatics but the balloonist dies soon thereafter. In the adventurer's notebook are a number of drawings of bizarre winged creatures, half bat, half panther. Do such creatures exist or are they the fevered imaginings of a dying scientist?



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Rick has comments on the season finale of Smallville, the comic strip, Prince Valiant, the movie, Madagascar and the DVD, Have Gun -- Will Travel, Season Two. He also lists what to watch on TV in June.



Here, There and Everywhere by Chris Roberson

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Roxanne Bonaventura discovers the Sofia, a mysterious metallic armband that allows her to travel through time and, eventually, through alternate realities. Roxanne's use of the Sofia begins small as she tries to gain time by living in different periods and then returning only a few moments after she left. When her father begins to suffer from cancer, she attempts to use the Sofia to ease his suffering, if not cure the cancer entirely.



The Dharma of Star Wars by Matthew Bortolin

Wed, 1 Jun 2005 11:00:00 GMT

Book publishers everywhere are scrambling to take advantage of the media swirls that surround Revenge of the Sith. Many understand that a timely publication will equal greater sales than otherwise possible. This book falls directly in this mold. While the motives of the author and publisher are not necessarily monetary rather than idealistic, the product is a thinly disguised attempt to associate a popular form of entertainment with a popular form of spiritual enlightenment.