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P.S. A Column On Things



By Paul E. Schindler Jr. Some things are impossible to know, but it is impossible to know these things. I no longer have a day job. I'm retired! So every word of this is my opinion, This offer IS void in Wisconsin. Except, of course, that some mate



Updated: 2018-01-02T20:13:57-08:00

 



Life is short, and we do not have too much time to gladden the hearts of those who travel the way with us

2018-01-02T20:13:57-08:00

I was discussing the "life is short" blessing, used by Father Larry Hunter of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in Orinda several years ago. All the online versions just seemed slightly off.Then with the help of the Wayback Machine (the Internet...

I was discussing the "life is short" blessing, used by Father Larry Hunter of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in Orinda several years ago. All the online versions just seemed slightly off.Then with the help of the Wayback Machine (the Internet Archive), we found his exact wording, which, we agreed, was the best. Typepad is very well indexed by Google, so I hope that the next time someone is looking for this prayer, then can find this first-rate version.

 

Life is short,
and we do not have too much time to gladden the hearts of those who travel the way with us;
So be swift to love,
and make haste to be kind,
And may the Divine Mystery Who is beyond our ability to know
but Who made us, and Who loves us, and Who travels with us,
Bless us and keep us in peace. Amen.

 

A benediction by Dr. Edmund Jones adapted from words by philosopher and writer Henri Frederic Amiel, 1821-1887




Gratitude and Thanksgiving

2016-11-23T18:13:30-08:00

For 18 years, I have been running variations of the same Thanksgiving column, listing the things for which I am thankful. A variety of events during the last several years led me to stop posting regular blog entries and start...

For 18 years, I have been running variations of the same Thanksgiving column, listing the things for which I am thankful. A variety of events during the last several years led me to stop posting regular blog entries and start writing  regular entries in a gratitude journal, which got me to thinking of the difference between thankful  and grateful. Google isn't much help:

Grateful: feeling or showing an appreciation of kindness; thankful.
Thankful: pleased and relieved, grateful


So, basically, it treats the words as synonymous. I do still give thanks for my health and my family. I am also grateful to have them in my life. I am grateful to be of use, to my family and others. I am grateful for the love I get and the love I have an opportunity to give. I am grateful that my medical problems are all treatable. Every day, I am grateful to be here, because every minute I have had since January 2007 has been a gift. I cherish that gift. I don't need Clarence the Angel to show me that this is a wonderful life; unlike George Bailey, I have never for a moment doubted that the world is a better place for my being in it. I give thanks for my blessings every morning, and expect to do so for the rest of my life. And, yes, especially on Thanksgiving Day.

Finally, if you feel life has been dealing to you from the bottom of the deck, I recommend the practice of keeping a gratitude journal. Write down one or two things each day for which you are grateful. Big or small, serious or silly. You may find it helps you keep things in perspective; I know it has had that effect on me. Going back and rereading it sometimes can be an interesting and rewarding activity.

For all of you who are still left to read this now-occasional blog, Happy Thanksgiving!




Thanksgiving

2016-11-23T18:16:20-08:00

If this sounds familiar, it is because, in the great tradition of Herb Caen and Jon Carroll (both now gone from the Chronicle and nearly forgotten), I am recycling my 12 previous Thanksgiving messages from 18years. This year we will...

If this sounds familiar, it is because, in the great tradition of Herb Caen and Jon Carroll (both now gone from the Chronicle and nearly forgotten), I am recycling my 12 previous Thanksgiving messages from 18years.

This year we will be in Orinda, California, my wife and my older daughter and her husband, and my nephew and his beloved. My younger daughter will be back for a Saturday Thanksgiving at her sister’s.

I know I have a lot to be thankful for. I am enjoying retirement, I have my health, such as it is, and I have my family. I can't imagine why I would bother getting out of bed each morning if not for my wife and my two girls.

My most important role is as husband to Vicki and father to my daughters.

The years I spent full-time with my girls are priceless. The time I spend with them now is priceless as well.

Not everyone can work in a home office, as I did for two decades.

But no matter where you work, the next time you have to make the tough call between the meeting and the soccer game, go to the soccer game. You'll never regret it. I am thankful for my family. Be thankful for yours.

Also give thanks for your friends and your good fortune. Spread that good fortune around in any way you can. I have much to be thankful for this holiday season, as I have had every year of my life. Another friend slipped out of this world during 2016, and I will miss him as I will miss my other departed friends.

I am thankful that I have a loving brother. I am thankful for my loving and understanding wife, and for the two most wonderful daughters I could have imagined, both of them turning into vibrant, intelligent young women before my very eyes.

I am thankful for every sunrise and sunset I get to see, every moment I get to be in, every flower I try so desperately to stop and smell. I am thankful that I can move closer every day to living a life in balance. Every morning, I am grateful to be alive. Not a bad way to start the day. For reasons I don't want to detail, I am extremely grateful just to be alive.

I am thankful for 250 pounds; down 50 from my peak. I am thankful for the fact that I will still be near that weight next year at Thanksgiving.

Every week at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in Orinda, the former vicar concluded the service with this homily. The provenance seems uncertain; the Internet lists several attributions. All I know is, it touches me every time I hear it and is sound advice for life: The new vicar has discarded it, but I haven’t.

"Remember that life is short and we have too little time to gladden the hearts of those who travel the way with us. So be quick to be kind, make haste to love, and may the blessing of God be with you now and always."

It has been with me. I hope it is with you. In the meantime, I am thankful, finally, for each and every one of you reading this column. I hope you have a great Thanksgiving!




This and That

2016-11-23T18:10:48-08:00

I have collected a lot of string since last I posted. In July, when the shape of the future was dimmer, I received this email from my friend John Ruley. I guess I am violating Godwin’s law, but it does...I have collected a lot of string since last I posted. In July, when the shape of the future was dimmer, I received this email from my friend John Ruley. I guess I am violating Godwin’s law, but it does provide some historical perspective: On your Brexit Correction - according to William Shirer, in Rise and Fall of the Third Reich (Chapters 6 and 7), Hitler was first appointed as chancellor after the Nazis failed to win a clear majority in the 1932 elections - but after he became chancellor, in what Shirer calls "the last relatively free election Germany was to have" - received 44% of the total vote, which while not a majority far outpaced that of competing parties. Hitler formed a coalition with the nationalist party, and that gave him the majority he needed to pass the "enabling laws" that gave him absolute power, among other things outlawing all other political parties, including his erstwhile nationalist allies. So, while Hitler was not personally brought to power in a free election, he in fact gained power legally - as he often said - as a result of free elections. Strange, but true!  Long-time reader Stephen Coquet (one of the few who came to this column organically, rather than through pre-existing friendship with me) suggested this article about Hillary’s email server, back when it still might have done some good if placed before a wider readership. I feel like I let our side down. He also sent me this article from the Guardian about Baltimore police surveillance, and added, The key statement is, “Police spokesperson TJ Smith insisted that the privately funded agreement between Persistent Surveillance Systems and city police 'was not a secret surveillance program.' " They just thought better if they didn’t tell anyone. Dan Grobstein mentioned something I had vaguely heard about: A hip, cuddly and cunningly sadistic musical adaptation of the 1993 Bill Murray movie has opened in London. It is scheduled for the August Wilson Theatre on Broadway starting on April 17, 2017 Dan also passed along Ang Lee Is Embracing a Faster Film Format. Can Theaters Keep Up? There are exactly two U.S. theaters showing Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk at 120 fps; one is the Cinerama Dome in LA, where I plan to see it soon. The other is in New York City. Dan also tipped me to the race to preserve old celluloid.   Kevin Sullivan has a book tip: Looking at your book list, I was reminded by your love of film that I recently enjoyed reading - a) "Adventures in the Screen Trade" by William Goldman, and then for fun, the actual book by him of "The Princess Bride". Both were informative and enjoyable. This from my friend and former colleague Jerry Pournelle (the article is behind the paywall) "I have ordered the book, but the review is itself informative and interesting." We’re All Cord Cutters Now At one chain, the top 100 movie titles accounted for 85% of the DVDs rented in-store. But online, the top titles make up only 35% of rentals. By Frank Rose Sept. 6, 2016 7:18 p.m. ET Does the internet pose a threat to established entertainment companies? Michael D. Smith and Rahul Telang lead a class at Carnegie Mellon University in which a student recently put that question to a visiting executive. He pooh-poohed the idea: “The original players in this industry have been around for the last 100 years, and there’s a reason for that.” As co-heads of CMU’s Initiative for Digital Entertainment Analytics, Messrs. Smith and Telang aim to counter this line of thought, and in “Streaming, Sharing, Stealing” they do just that, explaining gently yet firmly exactly how the internet threatens established ways and what can and cannot be done about it. Their book should be required for anyone who wishes to believe that nothing much has changed. [...]



From The Desk of Daniel Dern

2016-11-23T18:19:04-08:00

Dern spotted the British Version of the musical version of Groundhog Day. It is nice that some people have noticed my GHD obessesion). He sent along two other Bill Murray observations: 1) Bill in a Brooklyn bar 2) If you...Dern  spotted the British Version of the musical version of Groundhog Day. It is nice that some people have noticed my GHD obessesion). He sent along two other Bill Murray observations: 1) Bill in a Brooklyn bar 2) If you didn't see the recent THE JUNGLE BOOK, you should -- for you, because, if nothing else, Bill Murray voices Baloo (the bear), and yes, he and Mowgli do indeed sing "The Bear Necessities." Here they are doing it live on Jimmy Kimmel:. Also from Dern: Watch the New York Public Library's Beautiful Reading Room Get Reshelved with Books and (SNL) movie trailer for Disney Bambi live-action sequel Too late for theaters, but just in time for on-demand and DVDs from the Library, are some brief reviews from Daniel Dern (who also discovered Windows 9). Yes, I know I used to review these things myself, but I also used to eat a pound bag of M&Ms and drink a large bottle of Tab at one sitting—there are lots of things I used to do that I don’t do anymore. Star Trek Beyond -  I'm sure there are no shortage of plot holes, cavils, and legit criticisms, but I thought this movie was Just Fine. Gave us lots of what we want -- lingering looks at the Enterprise, space fights, (a reasonable amount of) snappy dialog. Recommended. Note, no 'post-credit end of movie 'Easter Egg.'' Deadpool - I'm sure you saw this in the theatre. (I didn't.) The BluRay version includes lots of bits that were left out because of too much cussin', violence, sex, etc., dramatically upping the humor level. If you haven't seen the BluRay, consider doing so. The Jungle Book - I never read Kipling's stories this is based on, nor saw the Disney animated 'toon. This take was live/CGI, and quite well done. The Legend of Tarzan - I see that the reviews were mixed, to say the least. I enjoyed it. Jane was played by Margot Robbie, who (of course, although I didn't remember until seeing the info online) played Dr. Harley Quinn in the recent Suicide Squad movie. Brooklyn - A good historical (pre-WWII USA) movie with no villains, no chase scenes, no explosions. Through the Looking Glass - Having just watched it courtesy of our library, I enjoyed it, and recommend it. In some ways it's better than Burton's previous Alice movie, although I can easily list what feels like some weak points in TtLGlass. Much of what I could say, I won't, because it would be spoilers. Here's what I will say: It's not a movie of Carroll's book. It does take place in that "universe," focusing on Alice, with many familiar characters. It's an action movie. It opens with explosions, and builds. It looks fabulous. The library disk had a good short feature on aspects of the costuming which give a better look at some of the details. And Sasha Baron Cohen has a great role and does it well. That's all I'm going to say, that should be enough. Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets - Official Trailer #1 (2017)  [...]



A few political words

2016-11-23T18:06:43-08:00

Faithless electors on Dec. 19 seem like a good idea, but aren't really likely, despite Hillary's popular vote lead. Exit polls aren't perfect, but they sure raise some questions in an election where the electoral college victory was won with...

Faithless electors on Dec. 19 seem like a good idea, but aren't really likely, despite Hillary's popular vote lead.

Exit polls aren't perfect, but they sure raise some questions in an election where the electoral college victory was won with the votes of fewer people that you can find watching Ohio State play football on a Saturday.

A friend noted the work of Bob Fitrakis, Ph.D., J.D., who was an international election observer for the 1994 presidential election in El Salvador and co-wrote and edited the international observer's report for the United Nations. He was also a lead attorney in the Moss v. Bush election challenge in 2004 and is currrently suing the Edison Research Group regarding their practice of adjusting exit poll data in favor of improbable results. 

Charts courtesy of Greg Kilcup. 


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Airing A Peeve and an Interest

2016-07-23T06:41:19-07:00

My career as a professional journalist began in the summer of 1973 at the Oregon Journal, the afternoon daily newspaper in Portland, Oregon, one of the 50 largest newspapers in the country. I loved the OJ and I am proud...My career as a professional journalist began in the summer of 1973 at the Oregon Journal, the afternoon daily newspaper in Portland, Oregon, one of the 50 largest newspapers in the country. I loved the OJ and I am proud of my two stints there as a reporter. It was a great paper produced by great people, and I learned a lot. But the New York Times it was not. As far as I could tell, we did not have copy persons to do errands for us. We bought our own coffee, took our own copy to the City Desk, and, if we needed clippings to support a story, we went downstairs to the morgue and got them ourselves. The latter meant that, if you were on deadline (and at an afternoon newspaper that closed at noon, you were nearly always on deadline), you almost never had time to "pull the clips." So, if you had to reference an historical event, you turned to the person on the desk next to you and said, "When was the First National Tower built," and they told you "the late 60s." The OJ (and for that matter, nearly all other newspapers) were filled with such imprecision, as were the Associated Press and United Press International, where I also worked. Not only were such imprecise dates common, they were also (given the nature of human memory) frequently incorrect. [I pause here for an anecdote. In their latter years, my parents kept disagreeing about events in their past. "You know, 40 years ago when we went to Disneyland," my mom would say, and Dad would say, "No it was 30 years," and they would argue and become frustrated. This occurred so frequently that they finally agreed; everything happened "about 10 years ago." It made for some silly conversations, but ir prevented domestic strife.] Frankly, reading "the late 60s" irritated me, and having to write it frustrated me. It became a pet peeve of mine; whenever I had the time and resources, I tried to find the actual dates. For most of my career, such research was difficult, time-consuming and sometimes impossible. Just as I was leaving journalism, Google arrived on the scene. How I wish we had access to Google back in the day. Of course, the Internet is a cornucopia of bad data, but if you are diligent and vet your sources carefully (I am looking at you, Wikipedia), you can arrive at actual dates with some hope of accuracy, particularly if the event occurred after 1995. So that's my peeve. My interest is in Bob and Ray, radio comedians whose radio careers stretched from WHDH in Boston in 1946 (no precise date available) to National Public Radio, ending on April 5, 1987.  I don't know where I was first exposed to them; my family regularly listened to KOIN (where I might have heard their 1959-60 CBS program at age 7) and KGW (where I might have heard them on the weekend NBC Monitor program). In any case, I cannot remember a time when I was not aware of them  nor when I was not amused by them. They were two very funny people. For complicated reasons, I decided I would like to be able to keep straight the timeline of their joint career. This is no easy matter, especially in the early 1950s, when they worked multiple simultaneous jobs and also moved around quite a bit. "Surely someone has done a Bob and Ray timeline," I thought. Well, no. Not until now. Based on numerous old-time radio sources and the excellent book Bob and Ray, Keener Than Most Persons, by David Pollock. In case of prizes, duplicate ties were awarded. That is, when dates from the Internet and Dave conflicted, I went with Dave. Here now, for the first time ever, anywhere, is a complete Bob and Ray Timeline. I will correct it if someone runs across it and finds an error (information on contacting me is in the sidebar on the right of the page) [...]



Brexit Correction

2016-07-23T06:17:27-07:00

Another reason for not mentioning Hitler in an argument is the risk of getting the reference wrong. My friend Kevin Mostyn wrote to correct my reminder that the German people elected Hitler, a cliche I was taught when I was...

Another reason for not mentioning Hitler in an argument is the risk of getting the reference wrong. My friend Kevin Mostyn wrote to correct my reminder that the German people elected Hitler, a cliche I was taught when I was quite young:

Strictly speaking, Hitler was not voted into power by the German people. The Nazis were elected as the largest party in the Reichstag, but they weren't the majority. Hitler was *appointed* Chancellor, not elected. Later, the Reichstag, not the people, gave him special powers, through the law called the Ermächtigungsgesetz [Enabling Act]. Those who would have voted against it where mostly excluded from the vote. Hitler took that law and ran with it. You know the rest of the story. But he was *not* elected by the German people, to rule Germany. Of course, while things were going well, they loved him.


I don't know if this makes my comparison better or worse. Donald Trump, who collected more primary votes than any Republican ever before, still collected a plurality, not a majority, of the votes.




This and That

2016-07-23T06:15:28-07:00

This is a funny talking dog video. Check out Donald and Hobbes. Daniel Dern found this great pun in the funnies. In Brexit news: The single best summary of Brexit. The funniest comment is this "Hitler" screed, sent to me...

This is a funny talking dog video.

Check out Donald and Hobbes.

Daniel Dern found this great pun in the funnies.

In Brexit news: The single best summary of Brexit. The funniest comment is this "Hitler" screed, sent to me by Robert Malchman. I am apparently the last to hear of this meme, since the London Daily Telegraph rounded up the best of these screeds in 2009. Just because I (and maybe you) are behind a meme doesn't mean it isn't still funny.




WTF

2016-06-30T07:24:11-07:00

Why yes, I did give up this column. And despite three weekly Thursday publications in a row, I really don't think it is back for good. But who knows; I never said never, I just said "not weekly."

Why yes, I did give up this column. And despite three weekly Thursday publications in a row, I really don't think it is back for good. But who knows; I never said never, I just said "not weekly."




Brexit Special: Expats Check In

2016-06-30T07:23:21-07:00

From London, Larry King writes: I'm gobsmacked, to use a Briticism, which under the alien registration acts soon to be enacted I might no longer be allowed to do. Or might be required to do. It's unclear so far whether...

From London, Larry King writes:

I'm gobsmacked, to use a Briticism, which under the alien registration acts soon to be enacted I might no longer be allowed to do. Or might be required to do. It's unclear so far whether the thugs will impose mass deportations or enforced assimilation.

I might be getting a little overwrought, but make no mistake, this was a victory for the thugs. The kind of people who voted to quit the European Union are the same kind of people who drool and gibber at Trump rallies. They are largely the uneducated, the ignorant, and the mean-hearted. Above all, they hate and fear foreigners, and an inch below the surface, they hate and fear anybody different from themselves.

I'm going to have to sit and think for a while about what it all means.

From Amsterdam, I hear from another friend:

We don’t read all the Dutch newspapers in depth, but we haven’t seen anything that would lead us to believe there’s a signficant movement here to leave the EU. The only people pushing for it seem to be the ones who are anti-immigration, but they are not mainstream here. Most Dutch continue to have “welcoming” as part of their genetic makeup, and as they have for hundreds of years, they recognize that they’re way too small to go it alone. They were one of the founders of the EU and I can’t imagine them wanting to leave. Of course I couldn’t imagine Bush winning (twice) or Trump getting the nomination, so stranger things have happened. But that kind of stuff hasn’t happened here, and I like to think people here are fundamentally different than in the U.S. That’s certainly been our experience so far and one of the main reasons we feel at home here.

A friend in Seattle chimed in:

As a college history major back in the 1960s, one of my insights (it earned me an A+ on a paper) was that the United States seemed to be following Great Britain by 20-30 years in many respects. I think this still has some validity, and I am not encouraged by what I'm seeing.

There was this thought-provoking note from another friend:

In the 1820’s the five Central American republics created a short-lived union. The 20th century saw the United Arab Republic, which attempted to fuse Egypt, Syria and North Yemen. In our own country, the founders quickly saw problems with the Articles of Confederation and, going in the other direction, replaced them with a strong Constitution. Then four score and something years later, we fought a great war to establish the principle that there’s no getting out.

I loathe Wikipedia, but it has some thoughts on the subject.

 [I used to tell my students the United States is like the Hotel California; you can check in any time you like but you can never leave. No article 50 in the U.S. Constitution, no matter what Texas says.]




Meanwhile, in another part of town

2016-06-30T07:21:33-07:00

If you were to download a recent New York Times Book Review podcast, and listen at the 43:48 mark, you might well hear a familiar voice describing his experience with Have Space Suit, Will Travel by Robert Heinlein. Daniel Dern...

 

If you were to download a recent New York Times Book Review podcast, and listen at the 43:48 mark, you might well hear a familiar voice describing his experience with Have Space Suit, Will Travel by Robert Heinlein.

Daniel Dern tipped me to this:

 

‘The West Wing Weekly,’ a Podcast With a Ringer

By ROBERT ITO

Joshua Malina and Hrishikesh Hirway, the podcast’s co-hosts, have set an ambitious goal: discuss all 154 episodes of one of TV’s most beloved shows.




Brexit

2016-06-24T06:58:37-07:00

I have gone, in the space of 24 hours, from mildly optimistic about the future of my country to wildly pessimistic. After all, if the Little Englanders can sleepwalk their country into an economic abyss because of fear of incipient...

I have gone, in the space of 24 hours, from mildly optimistic about the future of my country to wildly pessimistic.

After all, if the Little Englanders can sleepwalk their country into an economic abyss because of fear of incipient Turkish immigration, what will the birthers in this country do out of fear of immigration, or of the 11 million undocumented immigrants already here? If I were living in England and were anything other than a Christian of Northern European descent, I would be very afraid today. Very afraid.

I think it is quite possible that European Council president Donald Tusk was right when he said, "As an historian I fear Brexit could be the beginning of the destruction of not only the EU but also Western political civilization in its entirety.” Or as Peter Venkman (Bill Murray) put it in Ghostbusters, after this vote there will be, “Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together... mass hysteria.” Part of me expected British institutions (700-800 years old, depending on whether you count the Magna Carta or Parliament) to prevent a disaster like this, much the same way many people hope our 228-year-old institutions will serve as a check, should the worst happen here in November. Assuming we make it to November without some disruptive upheaval.

It CAN happen here.

It DID happen there. I write this next paragraph in full recognition of the fact that I am about to validate Godwin’s law. I can only say any lesser analogy seems insufficient. According to Wikipedia:

Godwin's law is an Internet adage asserting that "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazism or Hitler approaches 1." That is, if an online discussion (regardless of topic or scope) goes on long enough, sooner or later someone will compare someone or something to Hitler or Nazism.

Remember, please, that Hitler was voted into power in Germany. There was no coup. The good people of Deutschland voluntarily placed a manifestly unfit man in charge of their country and paid a horrible price. They voted their fear and anger. I hope to God we will not do the same, but I now fear we will. These seem to be the times. We followed Thatcher with Reagan. Will we follow Brexit with...

 




Trying To Be Serious During The Primary

2016-06-23T07:09:02-07:00

For the flip side of my story about failing in the general election at Beaver Boys’ State with a humorous speech that won me my party’s nomination, here’s Kevin Sullivan’s experience: I tried a 'serious' speech in my own multi-person...

For the flip side of my story about failing in the general election at Beaver Boys’ State with a humorous speech that won me my party’s nomination, here’s Kevin Sullivan’s experience:

I tried a 'serious' speech in my own multi-person primary  for the Mass Boys State in the summer of 1968 which was held at UMass, Amherst. I had the misfortune to be from Town #1 and thus, spoke first. The remaining 11 speakers a) tore my speech apart (so much for introducing substance in an election where you only get to speak once), and b) were more humorous and memorable  (admittedly, a lesson I learned the hard way). I did not get my party's nomination.

On the flip side, I did end up running for the Senate seat which was not chosen by a general election, but by a panel judging a written essays on addressing national and world problems. I was chosen as the #1 alternate.




Wholesale vs. Retail Politics: UMOC Edition

2016-06-23T07:04:20-07:00

Sometimes, the lessons we think we are learning turn out not to be the most large-scale lessons we could learn. For example, in 1976, two years after the events described, I wrote this: Dignity? I proved I had none during...

Sometimes, the lessons we think we are learning turn out not to be the most large-scale lessons we could learn. For example, in 1976, two years after the events described, I wrote this:

Dignity? I proved I had none during my campaign for Ugliest Man On Campus, a charity campaign at MIT. It was fall of my senior year. It was not my idea to run really, although I certainly had the chance to withdraw if I wanted to. But the staff of the student newspaper, The Tech, entered me and knew I wouldn’t back down. My best fund-raising trick (I lacked the guts to walk around and ask people for money, I had to have a trick) was selling people a chance to throw a cream pie at me (actually, they were shaving cream, just like on television).

My then girlfriend thought it was an awfully cheap and undignified way to run the campaign and that it heaped unnecessary indignity on me. She also disliked the demeaning newspaper ad my managing editor ran several times in The Tech. She said somehow the other candidates managed to maintain their dignity and pride and I did not.

Do you see the lesson hidden in this story that is relevant to today? I do. In fact, I have been describing this incident for years as teaching me that retail politics work, wholesale politics don't. [It wasn't until I started typing up my 1976 journal that I realized I had thought, at the time, it was a lesson about dignity]. While I was running newspaper ads and holding [pie-throwing] "rallies" in the lobby of Building 10, my opponents were applying old-fashioned shoe leather, going from door to door asking people directly to put money in their tins. And I was beaten like a drum. In the years since, I have seen multiple political campaigns in which someone tries to win wholesale. Sometimes that happens. Usually, retail and personal wins in politics. I suspect that will happen again this year.