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Comments for The Lone Sysadmin



Rounding Up IT Outlaws



Last Build Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2017 15:10:35 +0000

 



Comment on Stop Chrome Autoplay by Bob Plankers

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 15:10:35 +0000

All I did was put: chrome://flags/#autoplay-policy in the location bar and it is right at the top. I'm using Chrome on Windows, 61.0.3163.100.



Comment on Stop Chrome Autoplay by Scott R.

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 21:27:11 +0000

I tried your link and instructions within a Chrome browser session (it sounds so simple), but did not find the autoplay policy to set (as described), even after using the Find menu choice in the Chrome browser to look for "autoplay". Perhaps there is a missing step or I am doing something wrong. Any further instructions / screen shots would be appreciated. I like what your change is supposed to do (disable auto-play), and want it to work for me. Thanks, Scott R.



Comment on Software is Always Broken by Is Software Broken or Unrealized? - Gestalt IT

Thu, 05 Oct 2017 12:00:45 +0000

[…] Bob Plankers, I’m also updating to the latest version of iOS 11 as I write this. His primary assertion […]



Comment on Software is Always Broken by Bob Plankers

Wed, 27 Sep 2017 21:13:56 +0000

I agree. I assumed that the builds are tied to checkins, though, rather than just a continuous loop or anything.



Comment on Software is Always Broken by Mike Diehn

Wed, 27 Sep 2017 10:40:12 +0000

I have to think Apple and VMware are doing some form of automated build and testing and 6,700 builds a day is reasonable for large projects doing continuous integration. Consider that their automation could be building many editions of their software, as ours does, and 10,000 builds a day is easy



Comment on Let’s Prosecute Unlicensed Engineering in IT by Bob Plankers

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 17:12:36 +0000

Master of Custodial Arts!



Comment on Let’s Prosecute Unlicensed Engineering in IT by Bob Plankers

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 17:10:36 +0000

I never get to the fact that I think there ought to be a path for people like yourself to be called “engineer” officially. Especially in this age of distance learning and non-traditional post secondary education.



Comment on Let’s Prosecute Unlicensed Engineering in IT by Nathan Hudson

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 02:35:09 +0000

So does my Bachelor's degree from the Milwaukee School of Engineering in Management Systems qualify me or does my Microsoft Certifications qualify me more for my engineering title? Both have a certain level of expertise involved to obtain credentials but I think my 16 years working in the industry makes both of them relevant, neither by themselves would hold a lot of water



Comment on Let’s Prosecute Unlicensed Engineering in IT by Matt Heldstab

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 23:28:00 +0000

Don't forget about our sanitation engineer friends out there. What a shame. :'(



Comment on Let’s Prosecute Unlicensed Engineering in IT by Bob Plankers

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 18:07:47 +0000

1. His lawsuit should be a slam-dunk, what Oregon did is prior restraint. 2. There is no legal basis for a "virtual" engineer. You either claim to be an engineer and are licensed to practice it, or are not. Definition of "professional" is "engaged in a specified activity as one's main paid occupation rather than as a pastime." Seems straightforward. 3. I disagree wholeheartedly. Take, for example, a breach where data is exfiltrated. We often think in terms of data that contains personally identifying information, credit card data, SSNs, and so on, where there is a clear problem with that data being public. However, other data like financial statements, email, and other seemingly mundane documents can contribute greatly to a dip in a publicly-traded company's stock price, which has negative effects on investors, and possibly negative effects on people's well-being (think pension funds, etc.). Also, all companies have HR data, which contains sensitive data. I would say that the majority of IT professionals work in environments where the performance of their duties can directly affect the welfare of others.