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Comments on This Space: Narrative voice from book to book





Updated: 2017-10-22T11:16:53.948+01:00

 



What has always struck me about Coetzee, for examp...

2009-11-10T10:01:36.781+00:00

What has always struck me about Coetzee, for example, is that the man who wrote Foe also wrote Disgrace and also wrote Waiting for the Barbarians and also wrote Diary of a Bad Year. Each time, you could have been fooled into thinking a different writer had written the book. Foe, in particular, stands out.
However, I'm not sure this necessarily always defines a great writer. I'm thinking Beckett and Sebald: for me, their narrative voices hardly change at all, and yet their brilliance is undoubted. As I said to you earlier, Steve, I'd mainline Beckett's texts if I could... (but I think this all depends on the kind of writer you are: I don't think Coetzee's skills mean he is better than SB or WGS)



We are talking about that idea of the authorlessne...

2007-07-25T07:51:00.000+01:00

We are talking about that idea of the authorlessness of Art for my mfa program, but I do wonder where it fits into that perhaps tired, cliched "finding one's voice." I mean what is that, really? I like what you've raised here.

Meg



Touché old boy.

2007-07-20T16:17:00.000+01:00

Touché old boy.



f off

2007-07-19T23:22:00.000+01:00

f off



You've missed the s off 'récits' you under-educate...

2007-07-19T22:05:00.000+01:00

You've missed the s off 'récits' you under-educated oik.



I think that the Fielding / Richardson opposition ...

2007-07-19T09:11:00.000+01:00

I think that the Fielding / Richardson opposition is interesting but, perhaps -- and this is a bit of a literary parlour game I'll readily admit -- an opposition between, say, Defoe and Sterne might be equally as productive here.

Certainly, with Sterne (and earlier with Cervantes) there is both an urge to discover (a readiness for the text to discover as text all that it can), something we've lately called metatextuality and -- important for Blanchot_philes -- a kind of (pre-)existential Being-towards-death implicit in their comedy.