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Open Source Initiative Announces New Partnership With Adblock Plus

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 17:03:32 +0000

PALO ALTO, Calif. - Jan. 16, 2018 -- Adblock Plus, the most popular Internet ad blocker today, joins The Open Source Initiative® (OSI) as corporate sponsors. Since its very first version, Adblock Plus has been an open source project that has developed into a successful business with over 100 million users worldwide. As such, the German company behind it, eyeo GmbH, has decided it is time to give back to the open source community. Founded in 1998, the OSI protects and promotes open source software, development and communities, championing software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure. Adblock Plus is an open source project that aims to rid the Internet of annoying and intrusive online advertising. Its free web browser extensions (add-ons) put users in control by letting them block or filter which ads they want to see. Commenting on the partnership Patrick Masson, General Manager at the OSI said, "We're very excited to welcome Adblock Plus to the OSI's growing list of sponsors. Adblock Plus and eyeo demonstrate how open source software can not only support business but actually drive business — two important lessons we here at the OSI have been promoting for nearly 20 years." "With transparency being of utmost importance to us, Adblock Plus has been an open source project from the very start " said Wladimir Palant, eyeo founder & original developer. "This allowed us to build a loyal community around the project, with volunteer contributions helping the project to grow and thrive. We appreciate the work done by our community and will continue investing efforts into keeping Adblock Plus a truly open project where everybody can contribute" Till Faida, founder and CEO of eyeo adds: "I am proud that we have built a successful company based on open source software. We are convinced that being open is key to innovation, so for us it is a mission and a business case. Today, eyeo has more than 100 employees all around the world, producing and running open software, wherever possible. With Adblock Plus we want to contribute to a sustainable, fair and open web for creators and consumers. So it is only logical to provide our products as open source." Adblock Plus joins a broad range of well-known technology and software companies that all started as open source projects and matured into open source businesses. Now they are contributing back to the broader open source community as OSI sponsors and supporters. About Adblock Plus Adblock Plus (https://adblockplus.org/) is an open source project that aims to rid the Internet of annoying and intrusive online advertising. Its free web browser extension (add-ons) puts users in control by letting them block or filter which ads they want to see. Users across the world have downloaded Adblock Plus over 1 billion times, and it has remained the most downloaded and the most used extension almost continuously since November 2006. PC Magazine named the extension as one of the best free Google Chrome extensions, and it received About.com readers' choice award for best privacy/security add-on. Adblock Plus is a free browser add-on for Safari, Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Maxthon and Opera for desktop users, and offers a free browser for mobile users on iOS and Android. Follow Adblock Plus on Twitter at @AdblockPlus and read our blogs at adblockplus.org/blog/. Media press kit with FAQ, images and company statistics is available at: eyeo.com/en/press. Adblock Plus Media Contact Laura Dornheimlaura(a)adblockplus.org +49 172 8903504@schwarzblond About The Open Source Initiative Founded in 1998, the Open Source Initiative (OSI) protects and promotes open source software, development and communities, championing software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure, stewarding the Open Source Definition, and preventing abuse of the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement. The OSI is a California public benefit corporation, with 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. For more information about the OSI, see https://ope[...]



Twenty Years and Counting

Fri, 22 Dec 2017 14:14:04 +0000

The third decade of open source software starts in February 2018. How did it rise to dominance, and what’s next?20 years ago, in February 1998, the term “open source” was first applied to software, Soon afterwards, the Open Source Definition was created and the seeds that became the Open Source Initiative (OSI) were sown. As the OSD’s author Bruce Perens relates, 'Open Source' is the proper name of a campaign to promote the pre-existing concept of Free Software to business, and to certify licenses to a rule set. Twenty years later, that campaign has proven wildly successful, beyond the imagination of anyone involved at the time. Today open source software is literally everywhere. It is the foundation for the Internet and for the worldwide web. It powers the computers and mobile devices we all use, as well as the networks they connect to. Without it, cloud computing and the nascent Internet of Things would be impossible to scale and perhaps to create. It has allowed new ways of doing business to be tested and proven, allowing giant corporations like Google and Facebook to start from the top of a mountain others already climbed. Like any human creation, it has a dark side as well. It has also unlocked dystopian possibilities for surveillance and the inevitably consequent authoritarian control. It has provided criminals with new ways to cheat their victims and unleashed the darkness of bullying delivered anonymously and at scale. It allows destructive fanatics to organise in secret without the inconvenience of meeting. All of these are shadows cast by useful capabilities, just as every human tool through history has been useful both to feed and care and to harm and control. We need to help the upcoming generation to strive for irreproachable innovation. As Richard Feynman quoted, To every man is given the key to the gates of heaven. The same key opens the gates of hell. As open source has matured, so the way it is discussed and understood has also matured. The first decade was one of advocacy and controversy, while the second was marked by adoption and adaptation. In the first decade, the key question concerned business models – “how can I contribute freely yet still be paid”, while during the second more people asked about governance – “how can I participate yet keep control/not be controlled”. Open source projects of the first decade were predominantly replacements for off-the-shelf products, while in the second decade they were increasingly components of larger solutions. Projects of the first decade were often run by informal groups of individuals, while in the second decade they were frequently run by charities created on a project-by-project basis. Open source developers of the first decade were frequently devoted to a single project and often worked in their spare time. In the second decade, they were increasingly employed to work on a specific technology – professional specialists. While open source was always intended as a way to promote software freedom, during the first decade conflict arose with those preferring the term “free software”. In the second decade this conflict was largely ignored as open source adoption accelerated. So what will the third decade bring? The Complexity Business Model — The predominant business model will involve monetising the solution of the complexity arising from the integration of many open source parts, especially from deployment and scaling. Governance needs will reflect this. Open Source Mosaics — Open source projects will be predominantly families of component parts, together being built into stacks of components. The resultant larger solutions will be a mosaic of open source parts. Families Of Projects — More and more projects will be hosted by consortia/trade associations like the Linux Foundation and OpenStack and by general purpose charities like Apache and the Software Freedom Conservancy. Professional Generalists — Open source developers will increasingly be employed to integrat[...]



Twenty Years and Counting

Fri, 22 Dec 2017 14:13:54 +0000

The third decade of open source software starts in February 2018. How did it rise to dominance, and what’s next?20 years ago, in February 1998, the term “open source” was first applied to software, Soon afterwards, the Open Source Definition was created and the seeds that became the Open Source Initiative (OSI) were sown. As the OSD’s author Bruce Perens relates, “Open Source” is the proper name of a campaign to promote the pre-existing concept of Free Software to business, and to certify licenses to a rule set. Twenty years later, that campaign has proven wildly successful, beyond the imagination of anyone involved at the time. Today open source software is literally everywhere. It is the foundation for the Internet and for the worldwide web. It powers the computers and mobile devices we all use, as well as the networks they connect to. Without it, cloud computing and the nascent Internet of Things would be impossible to scale and perhaps to create. It has allowed new ways of doing business to be tested and proven, allowing giant corporations like Google and Facebook to start from the top of a mountain others already climbed. Like any human creation, it has a dark side as well. It has also unlocked dystopian possibilities for surveillance and the inevitably consequent authoritarian control. It has provided criminals with new ways to cheat their victims and unleashed the darkness of bullying delivered anonymously and at scale. It allows destructive fanatics to organise in secret without the inconvenience of meeting. All of these are shadows cast by useful capabilities, just as every human tool through history has been useful both to feed and care and to harm and control. We need to help the upcoming generation to strive for irreproachable innovation. As Richard Feynman quoted, To every man is given the key to the gates of heaven. The same key opens the gates of hell. As open source has matured, so the way it is discussed and understood has also matured. The first decade was one of advocacy and controversy, while the second was marked by adoption and adaptation. In the first decade, the key question concerned business models – “how can I contribute freely yet still be paid”, while during the second more people asked about governance – “how can I participate yet keep control/not be controlled”. Open source projects of the first decade were predominantly replacements for off-the-shelf products, while in the second decade they were increasingly components of larger solutions. Projects of the first decade were often run by informal groups of individuals, while in the second decade they were frequently run by charities created on a project-by-project basis. Open source developers of the first decade were frequently devoted to a single project and often worked in their spare time. In the second decade, they were increasingly employed to work on a specific technology – professional specialists. While open source was always intended as a way to promote software freedom, during the first decade conflict arose with those preferring the term “free software”. In the second decade this conflict was largely ignored as open source adoption accelerated. So what will the third decade bring? The Complexity Business Model — The predominant business model will involve monetising the solution of the complexity arising from the integration of many open source parts, especially from deployment and scaling. Governance needs will reflect this. Open Source Mosaics — Open source projects will be predominantly families of component parts, together being built into stacks of components. The resultant larger solutions will be a mosaic of open source parts. Families Of Projects — More and more projects will be hosted by consortia/trade associations like the Linux Foundation and OpenStack and by general purpose charities like Apache and the Software Freedom Conservancy. Professional Generalists — Open source developers will inc[...]



Open Yet Closed

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 16:12:48 +0000

In these days of code that no single mind can grasp, it's hard to see how software freedom is present when there's no realistic community access to source code.In the early days of Free Software, it was a safe assumption that anyone using a computer had coding skills of some sort -- even if only for shell scripts. As a consequence, many advocates of Free Software, despite a strong focus on user freedoms, had a high tolerance for software that made source available under free terms without providing binaries. That was considered undesirable, but as long as the source code could be used it was not disqualifying. Many other ways evolved to ensure that the software was somehow impractical to deploy without a commercial relationship with a particular vendor, even if the letter of the rules around Free Software was met. This tolerance for "open but closed" models continued into the new Open Source movement. As long as code was being liberated under open source licenses, many felt the greater good was being served despite obstacles erected in service of business models. But times have changed. Random code liberation is still desirable, but the source of the greatest value to the greatest number is the collaboration and collective innovation open source unlocks. While abstract "open" was tolerated in the 20th century, only "open for collaboration" satisfies the open source communities of the 21st century. Be it "open core", "scareware", "delayed open", "source only for clients", "patent royalties required" or one of the many other games entrepreneurs play, meeting the letter of the OSD or FSD without actually allowing collaboration is now deprecated. As a consequence, OSI receives more complaints from community members about "open yet closed" than any other topic. Companies of all sizes who loudly tout their love for open source yet withhold source code from non-customers generate the most enquiries of this type. When approached, OSI contacts these companies on behalf of the community but the response is always that they are "within their rights" under the relevant open source licenses and can do what they please. One claim that deserves to be soundly debunked is that it's OK to withhold open source code from non-customers. All open source licenses should be interpreted as requiring source to be made available to the public. OSD 2 is very clear: 2. The program must include source code, and must allow distribution in source code as well as compiled form. Where some form of a product is not distributed with source code, there must be a well-publicized means of obtaining the source code for no more than a reasonable reproduction cost, preferably downloading via the Internet without charge. The source code must be the preferred form in which a programmer would modify the program. Deliberately obfuscated source code is not allowed. Intermediate forms such as the output of a preprocessor or translator are not allowed.M/small> Interestingly it's common that the companies involved obtained the source code they are monetising under an open source license, while they themselves own the copyrights to a tiny percentage of the code. They can be considered to have enclosed the commons, enjoying the full benefits of open source themselves -- and celebrating it -- but excluding others from collaboration on the same terms. Many community members would tolerate this were it not for the company claims to be strong supporters of open source. Even this behaviour might be mitigated for some with upstream code contributions. But in the absence of public code, most community members dispute something is open source, regardless of the license used. "Open yet closed" may have been tolerated twenty years ago, but today the rule is open up or shut up. Image credit: "OpenClosedPost.png" is a derivative of "Paris - A Bicycle against an old wall - 4292.jpg", 2008 by Jorge Royan (Own work) via Wikimedia Commons and used with permission under the Creative Commons Attri[...]



Open Source Initiative Announces DigitalOcean Corporate Sponsorship

Wed, 08 Nov 2017 01:45:42 +0000

Cloud services platform will provide both financial and in-kind contributions to support OSI infrastructure and new collaboration platform. PALO ALTO, Calif. - Nov. 8, 2017 -- The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), dedicated to increasing the awareness and adoption of open source software, is delighted to welcome DigitalOcean as a Premium Sponsor. DigitalOcean, a cloud services platform designed for developers, will provide both financial support and hosting for several OSI community-driven services. A Forbes' Cloud 100 company, DigitalOcean's active engagement and investment in open source software highlights how today's most innovative and successful companies have recognized the value of, and opportunities within, open communities of collaboration. The company regularly sponsors open source related MeetUps and Hackathons—including their popular "Hacktoberfest", develops tutorials on open source technologies and techniques, maintains and contributes to a number of open source projects, and of course offers hosting to open source projects and foundations. "DigitalOcean's support provides a critical boost to the OSI's ongoing operations, and for the new, community-focused programs we'll be launching in 2018," says Patrick Masson, General Manager at OSI. "With the growth in open source software across all sectors, the OSI is seeing more and more requests for assistance and resources. DigitalOcean's services will provide the OSI with the dedicated infrastructure we need now to successfully extend and expand our support for the new and growing roles emerging in open source communities of practice." "One of our core company values is, our community is bigger than just us," says Greg Warden, VP, Engineering at DigitalOcean. "From our KVM-based hypervisors to our Go and Ruby applications running on our Kubernetes clusters, DigitalOcean is built on a foundation of open source. That's why it is so important for us to support the Open Source Initiative in its work promoting and protecting open source on behalf of the community." As a non-profit, community-driven organization, the OSI relies on the support of volunteers who lend their time to develop and manage internal operations and working groups; individual contributing members, whose annual dues provide critical support and votes elect the Board; Affiliate Members, composed of a who's who of open source projects and foundations, and; corporations who choose to support our mission through in-kind donations and generous financial contributions. About DigitalOcean DigitalOcean is a cloud services platform designed for developers that businesses use to run production applications at scale. It provides highly available, secure and scalable compute, storage and networking solutions that help developers build great software faster. Founded in 2012 with offices in New York and Cambridge, MA, DigitalOcean offers simple services, transparent pricing, an elegant user interface, and one of the largest libraries of open source resources available. For more information, please visit http://www.digitalocean.com or follow @digitalocean. About The Open Source Initiative Founded in 1998, the Open Source Initiative (OSI) protects and promotes open source software, development and communities, championing software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure, stewarding the Open Source Definition, and preventing abuse of the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement. The OSI is a California public benefit corporation, with 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. Media Contact Italo Vignoliitalo@opensource.org[...]



Ensuring Openness Through and In Open Source Licensing

Mon, 30 Oct 2017 22:25:34 +0000

It simply may not be clear to those encountering open source for the first time the scope of the Open Source Definition, or the standards expected by the international open source community, when OSI approved licenses are applied. We're here to help clear things up.Some of the largest forces in business today—consumer-facing companies like Google and Facebook, business-facing companies like Salesforce and SUSE, companies outside the tech industry such as BMW, Capital One, and Zalando, even first-gen tech corporations like Microsoft and IBM—all increasingly depend on open source software. Governments too, including the European Union, France, India, the United Kingdom, the United States, and many others have discovered the benefits of open source software and development models. Successful collaborative development of software and infrastructure used by these organizations is enabled by the safe space created when they use their IP in a new ways... to ensure an environment for co-creation where the four essential freedoms of software are guaranteed. Software distributed under an OSI Approved Open Source License offers much to businesses and governments: both as consumers and contributors. The software freedoms protected through open source licensing harnesses the power of distributed peer review and transparency of process driving economies through faster innovation, higher quality, better reliability, lower costs, and an end to vendor lock-in. The open source model also promotes increased security; because code in the public view will be exposed to extreme scrutiny, with problems found and fixed instead of kept secret until the wrong person discovers them. And last but not least, it's a way that the little guys can get together, innovate and have a good chance at beating an established participant. Participating in open source projects and communities can build open standards as actual software, rather than paper documents. It's a way for companies and individuals to collaborate around shared needs on a product that none alone could achieve or, in and of itself, does not constitute a key business differentiator. Governments too recognize the value of open source as both a technology solution delivering value to the public they serve, as well as an approach for development returning tax-payer investments back to the society they represent. A European Commission study of 2007 offered, “Open Source is key for ICT competitiveness”, yet, “Though FLOSS [Free/Libre Open Source Software] provides ample opportunities for Europe, it is threatened by increasing moves in some policy circles to support regulation that seeks to protect old business models of creative industries, making it harder to develop new ways of doing business.” [1] The Open Source Initiative (OSI) has successfully addressed copyright licensing as a concrete expression of software freedom since its founding in 1998. But open source software licenses were always intended to go beyond copyright to deliver rights permission and rights protection for developers and users in multiple IP classes, both explicitly and implicitly. OSI has never approved a license that did not include robust rights to freely make, use and sell software, as required by the OSI’s key principles. Open Source Includes Patents as well as Copyrights An open source project and participating communities of practice have always expected that, if a project is “open source”, then they will receive all necessary rights associated with former and current participants to be licensed without further action. This expectation is guaranteed in the Open Source Definition (OSD), “The rights attached to the program must apply to all to whom the program is redistributed without the need for execution of an additional license by those parties” [2]. The OSI has long explained that unrestricted licensing is essential to protect the software freedo[...]



Open Source Initiative, and Open Source Software Movement Celebrate Twenty Years

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:42:16 +0000

The Open Source Initiative will celebrate its 20th Anniversary in 2018. In the true open source spirit, the organization will invite everyone in the open source community to participate. Raleigh, NC Oct. 23, 2018 — All Things Open Conference — The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the global non-profit dedicated to raising awareness and adoption of open source software, announced today plans for the “Open Source 20th Anniversary World Tour” to run through 2018. Open source software is now ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental component to infrastructure, as well as a critical factor for driving innovation. Over the past twenty years, the OSI has worked to promote and protect open source software, development, and communities, championing software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure, stewarding the Open Source Definition (OSD), and preventing abuse of the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement. The “open source” label was created at a strategy session held on February 3rd, 1998 in Mountain View, California. That same month, now almost twenty years ago, the OSI was founded as a general educational and advocacy organization to raise awareness and adoption for the superiority of an open development process. To recognize this point in our shared history, the remarkable success of the open source software movement, and the inspiring fellowship of developers, maintainers, businesses and communities engaged in collaborative efforts across so many technology sectors, supporting just about every company and community, the OSI, in partnership with its affiliate members and sponsors, is organizing a global celebration to take place at a variety of open source venues worldwide throughout 2018. “The OSI's twenty year anniversary is a celebration of the open source software movement itself. We hope everyone who has helped to make open source software so successful will join us in celebrating code and communities,” said Patrick Masson, General Manager at the Open Source Initiative. As of today, the OSI has confirmed 2018 anniversary celebrations in conjunction with the leading open source conferences, as well as standalone community-led events, these include: All Things Open, Campus Party Brasil, China Open Source Conference, FOSDEM, FOSSASIA Summit, Linux.conf.au, LinuxFest Northwest, Open Apereo, Open Camps, OpenExpo, OpenTechSummit China, OSCON, Paris Open Source Summit, and SCALE16x. In addition to official events, the OSI is also supporting volunteer organizers in hosting local, community-led celebrations in their own cities. “Openness and sharing of knowledge is enabling our community in Asia to learn about new technologies every day, “ said Hong Phuc Dang, FOSSASIA Founder. “It is amazing what opportunities open source is providing to so many people. We are excited to be connected with contributors around the globe and to celebrate the achievements of Open Source in the 20th Anniversary World Tour in Singapore and China.” Pierre Baudracco, CEO of BlueMind, president of the Paris Open Source Summit committee program added, “We are very pleased to be the first European official milestone as part of OSI’s 20th Anniversary World Tour. Paris Open Source Summit, as a major global event of the Free and Open Source sector in Europe, addressing communities, markets, societies, research, politics and more, is just a perfect meeting place to celebrate 20 years of open source, worldwide openness and collaborative contributions.” About The Open Source Initiative The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is a non-profit corporation with global scope formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source and to build bridges among different constituencies in the open source community. One of the most important activities for the organization is as a standards body, mainta[...]



Open Source Initiative Welcomes Cumulus Networks As Premium Sponsor

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 22:15:48 +0000

Cumulus Networks' contributions support open source projects, developer communities, and now as an OSI Premium Sponsor, advocacy. The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the internationally recognized home of the open source software movement working to raise awareness and adoption of open source software, announced today the generous sponsorship of Cumulus Networks. Cumulus joins OSI's growing community of corporations that recognize the importance of not only investing in open source software projects and development, but also building a diverse ecosystem that promotes collaboration, enables innovation, and ensures quality. Cumulus Networks has a strong tradition of internally-driven development of original open source software, including most notably, contributions to the Linux kernel that complete the data center feature set for Linux such as Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF), MPLS, MLAG infrastructure, multicast routing features, etc. Cumulus' most recent open source effort is FRRouting, co-developed by a group of contributing companies in the open networking space, to enhance routing protocols. Cumulus Networks has also been a key driving member of the Open Network Install Environment (ONIE) with contributions to the Open Compute Project, Prescriptive Topology Manager--which simplifies the deployment of large L3 networks--and ifupdown2, a rewrite of Debian's tool for configuring networks that greatly simplifies large, complicated networking configurations. In addition to technical and code contributions, Cumulus has also invested in the development of educational and training programs to help open source developers and users become active contributors with a wide range of freely available resources. "We're very excited by Cumulus' sponsorship," said Patrick Masson, General Manager of the OSI. "Of course we're very grateful for their generous financial support, but also, as part of the sponsorship, we'll also be working with the Cumulus team to create and distribute professional development and training resources that will help the entire open source community learn new technologies, develop skills and more deeply engage with projects." "Open source is one Cumulus Networks' core principles, and we have a strong background at the company of both developing original open source software and contributing to projects," said Shrijeet Mukherjee, VP of Engineering of Cumulus Networks. "We're thrilled to sponsor The Open Source Initiative and contribute to an organization that is so positively impacting the community by raising awareness and adoption of open source." Contributions like those from Cumulus, allow the OSI to maintain its internationally recognized status as a nexus of trust with a mandate to protect and promote open source. The OSI engages with open source developers, communities of practice, as well as the public and private sectors around the world, furthering open source technologies, licenses, and models of development that can provide economic and strategic advantages. About Cumulus Networks Cumulus Networks (https://www.cumulusnetworks.com) is leading the transformation of bringing web-scale networking to enterprise cloud. As the only systems solution that fully unlocks the vertical network stacks of the modern data center, Cumulus Linux allows companies of all sizes to affordably build and efficiently operate their networks just like the world's largest data centers. By allowing operators to use standard hardware components, Cumulus Networks offers unprecedented operational speed and agility, at the industry's most competitive cost. Cumulus Networks has received venture funding from Andreessen Horowitz, Battery Ventures, Sequoia Capital, Peter Wagner and four of the original VMware founders. About The Open Source Initiative Founded in 1998, the Open Source Initiative (OSI) protects and promotes open source [...]



The Faces of Open Source: Mike Dolan

Wed, 04 Oct 2017 12:44:56 +0000

(image)

We're pleased to present the eighth, but sadly, final episode of Shane Martin Coughlan's, "The Faces of Open Source Law", featuring Mike Dolan. We'd like to thank Shane for his great work in introducing the issues related to open source software and communities, as well as the people so deeply involved and committed to helping the movement succeed.


It was the end of the conference, we had seven interviews completed, and the staff was packing up all around. Mike and I got together during the goodbyes between everyone and he mentioned he had a little free time. Instead of closing the season with a typical interview we decided to go a little light-hearted. We grabbed some potted plants from around the main conference room, pushed a few chairs together, and created a genuine knock-off of Between Two Ferns.

Mike commented that our setup was just as ramshackle as the actual show. Despite this we recorded one of the longer and most content-filled interviews of the season, providing a perfect end point to an experiment in connecting personalities to well-known names in the open source legal sphere.

width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VNyDzEBr-28" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="">


Other episodes:


"Mike Dolan - The Faces of Open Source Law - Season 1 - Episode 8" is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution license. "The Faces of Open Source Law" was shot during breaks at the FSFE Legal Network 'Legal and Licensing Workshop' in Barcelona during April 2017. Thanks to everyone who made it happen!




Transitions in Leadership

Thu, 28 Sep 2017 17:25:44 +0000

(image) Serving as president of the Open Source Initiative over the past few years has been a joy and an honor, and if I write a memoir someday I'm sure these will stand out as some of the best and brightest years in a long and happy open source career. It has been a delight to collaborate closely with so many people I admire greatly, including Deb Bryant, Molly de Blanc, Richard Fontana, Leslie Hawthorn, Mike Milinkovich, Simon Phipps, Josh Simmons, Carol Smith, Paul Tagliamonte, Italo Vignoli, and Stefano Zacchiroli.

I'm incredibly proud of what the organization has accomplished in that time, continuing stewardship of the open source license list, and growing our individual membership and affiliate programs which provide a path for the entire open source community to have a say in the governance of the OSI.

All good things must come to an end, and the time has come for me to pass along the president's hat to the next volunteer. My work life has grown busier and busier in recent months, and I'm starting a PhD soon, so the time I have available to contribute to the OSI has become incredibly fractured. I'd rather empower someone else to do a great job as president than do a mediocre job of it myself for the rest of the year.

It gives me great pleasure to share the news that the OSI board has elected Simon Phipps as the next president. Having Simon at the helm will help make the transition particularly easy, since he served as OSI president before me. I've known Simon for many years, long before either of us was involved in the OSI, and one thing that has always impressed me is the way he consistently engages with new ideas, championing the relevance of open source in the ever-changing modern world. He also gave the best talk that I've ever seen explaining the four software freedoms and advocating for software freedom (at a conference in Oslo in 2011).

I'll remain as a member of the OSI board, both to support a smooth transition to the new president, and to continue involvement in several active projects at the OSI. My hope is that handing off the administrative responsibility to Simon will enable me to focus my limited volunteer time on other things like improving the license review process.

I'll close with an invitation: if you have a passion for open source and/or free software, consider running for the OSI board in one of our annual elections. Any individual member of the OSI can self-nominate as a candidate for the board (voted by the body of individual members), and active affiliate organizations of the OSI can nominate anyone as a candidate (voted by the body of affiliate organizations). Director terms are only 2-3 years, so serving on the board isn't an overwhelming commitment, and is a great way to contribute your skills and experience to the open source and free software community. Who knows, maybe you'll be the next president of the OSI after Simon.