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Preview: Comments on CreationEvolutionDesign: Off-topic: Norton Antivirus froze my computer so I...

Comments on CreationEvolutionDesign: Off-topic: Norton Antivirus froze my computer so I switched to AVG Free





Updated: 2016-03-09T22:52:30.786+08:00

 



>AVG Free Edition will only do scheduled full s...

2009-08-07T16:58:49.638+08:00

>AVG Free Edition will only do scheduled full system scans, not scheduled quick scans ... as Norton Antivirus does.

Yes, but as I wrote previously, "I am so used to doing it that I don't think of it as a problem."

That is, I have set AVG Free's full scanner to start at 6am, or when my computer starts up, and it presumably scans all the key areas first, and then I pause or terminate the full scan after an hour or so when I want to use the computer.

Norton AV used to regularly tell me my paid version was not paid for and then after minutes of worrying, tell me it was paid for after all! It did not instil confidence in Norton's ability to detect viruses when it couldn't even detect that it was paid for. I don't have that problem with AVG free.

AVG Free has detected every virus before it became a problem and it also detects tracking cookies that might be a problem and I can move them to its Virus Vault. I then can tell Firefox and IE7 (I uninstalled IE8 and it reverted to IE7) to block that cookie site.

Having used Trend Micro, Nortons and AVG Free, I can unhesitating recommend AVG Free.

Stephen E. Jones



I guess in particular, AVG Free Edition will only ...

2009-08-07T16:22:30.829+08:00

I guess in particular, AVG Free Edition will only do scheduled full system scans, not scheduled quick scans of only key parts of a computer system as Norton Antivirus does.



Computer Repair >Thanks for this info post. N...

2009-07-01T19:50:04.529+08:00

Computer Repair

>Thanks for this info post.

Nearly two years later I am still using AVG Free on our two computers, and apart from a few minor hiccups, I have had no problems with it.

It has caught two viruses. Also, AVG Free now scans web sites before I click on a link to them and tells me if it is safe. At least one link it told me was infected and not to click on it.

I've got used to the lack of a partial scan with the free version. The full scan comes on at 6 am and after I have my morning Bible study and prayer time, shower and breakfast, I terminate it. I am so used to doing it that I don't think of it as a problem. In fact I had forgotten that it was a problem and only remembered when I read my post above.

I highly recommend AVG Free.

Stephen E. Jones



Thanks for this info post.

2009-07-01T16:43:50.964+08:00

Thanks for this info post.



Endoplasmic>You might be interesting in exploring ...

2007-08-05T06:33:00.000+08:00

Endoplasmic

>You might be interesting in exploring Ubuntu Christian Edition. There is also an OCR package for it. Of course, the normal way you would install it is by using the built-in package manager. In fact, I think you can try all this out without actually installing it on your hard disk. You should just be able to boot to the CD and try it out from there -- including installing new packages like OCR..

Thanks for the info. I had never previously heard of Ubuntu Christian Edition, nor Ubuntu generally. I note from your OCR link that it uses the tesseract-ocr which I had only yesterday come across in my reading about OCR under Linux.

If I did move to UNIX in the future I would certainly consider it. However, as I said in a previous comment, I was last seriously considering moving to Linux when I had to change from Windows 95 to Windows XP. I will probably next seriously consider moving to Linux if and when I have to move from XP to Vista.

But as I also said, to change to some version of UNIX just to avoid viruses would be using a sledgehammer to crack a nut, because apart from having to bother with running anti-virus software, viruses have never been a major problem to me, even though I have used computers on almost a daily basis since 1980.

In the meantime, I have thought about getting used to Open Office by installing it on my laptop. Since I don't do any scanning using my laptop, I might consider replacing its XP with Linux as a first step to moving across to Linux.

Stephen E. Jones
My other blog: TheShroudofTurin



You might be interesting in exploring Ubuntu Chris...

2007-08-04T20:46:00.000+08:00

You might be interesting in exploring Ubuntu Christian Edition.

There is also an OCR package for it.

Of course, the normal way you would install it is by using the built-in package manager.

In fact, I think you can try all this out without actually installing it on your hard disk. You should just be able to boot to the CD and try it out from there -- including installing new packages like OCR.



Disinterested Benevolence>the simple solution is t...

2007-08-04T08:20:00.000+08:00

Disinterested Benevolence

>the simple solution is to use a Linux based OS. no viruses....ever!

Thanks. In a former life I was a system administrator of seven hospital UNIX systems. So UNIX has no fears for me.

When Windows XP came out a few years ago and I was still using Windows 95, I seriously considered switching to UNIX and bought the disk and reference books for Red Hat Linux 9, which I still have.

But there was one major issue that stopped me changing from Windows to Linux. Then, as far as I knew, there was no equivalent scanning with optical character recognition (OCR) in Linux as there was in Windows. Since I do a lot of scanning, mainly OCR but also some graphics, that was (and still is) a major impediment to me switching from Windows to Linux.

I just Googled on "Linux + scanner + OCR" and according to this review there is now some scanner OCR under Linux but: a) as described it does not sound as good as my Windows-based OCR; and b) it costs much more: US$1,495 and then an annual maintenance contract of another $299 for Vividata's OCR Shop which is based on the same OmniPage engine that drives my OmniPage for Windows.

So if that is the best that Linux can offer at present, then I will reluctantly have to stay with Windows. I would be interested if you know anything different.

I might add that, apart from having to pay for virus scanning software (and even that is now not an issue with AVG Free), I have been using computers since ~1980 (before there was even Microsoft DOS and my first Windows was version 2.0 in ~1987) and I have only had one major virus infection - the Stoned virus in ~1988. So it would be taking a sledgehammer to crack a nut for me (and I presume most Windows users) to change over to UNIX just to avoid viruses.

Stephen E. Jones
My other blog: TheShroudofTurin



the simple solution is to use a Linux based OS. n...

2007-08-04T01:32:00.000+08:00

the simple solution is to use a Linux based OS. no viruses....ever!