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Widdershins by Charles de Lint

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

For as long as there have been stories about Newford, the mythical North American city which has become the author's signature setting, there have been Geordie Riddell and Jilly Coppercorn. Geordie's a musician with a fear of commitment and a long string of failed relationships (sometimes, he'll even tell you about the girlfriend who was stolen by a ghost from the past...) Jilly is Newford's answer to Kevin Bacon -- everyone knows her. An artist whose career and life were shattered by a tragic accident several years ago, she's been recovering ever so slowly. Geordie and Jilly are the best of friends, but what they don't realize, what everyone around them does, is that they'd be perfect for each other.



The Line Between by Peter S. Beagle

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

The author has always eschewed the falseness of sentimentality, while wringing all manner of emotions from his audience. That he does so with such unfailing grace is what has made him one of the finest of modern fantasists. Each one of the stories gathered here is aimed directly at the heart, and whether told in the voice of a sparky girl or an old man burdened by too many memories the tone is always the same. This, it tells us through all the joys and excitements, is the way we experience the sadness of the world.



Honored Enemy by Raymond E. Feist and William R. Forstchen

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

One of the standard practices in any war is the vilification of the enemy. This can be as obvious as using derogatory names for them to more insidious propagandistic techniques. In this first book of the Legends of the Riftwar series, the enemy forces of Kelewan and Midkemia find that in order to survive they must work together, and perhaps discover some of their hatred is misplaced.



New Arrivals: compiled by Neil Walsh

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Check out the latest from Stephen Baxter, Gwyneth Jones, Brian Lumley, Paul Park, Bruce Boston, Mark Chadbourn, and many more, as well as sneak previews of forthcoming books from Alan Dean Foster, Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer, Nina Kiriki Hoffman, John Crowley, and, yes, plenty more.



Visionary in Residence by Bruce Sterling

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

In the blink of an adult lifetime, Bruce Sterling has gone from fiery young literary radical to respected spokesman and commentator. Works such as Schismatrix and Islands in the Net, along with editing Mirrorshades, the defining cyberpunk anthology, quickly established his reputation in science fiction. Non-fiction like The Hacker Crackdown and a continual presence on the internet have given him name recognition and influence outside his science fiction audience.



V2:B4, The Vampire Vignettes Prequel by G.L. Giles

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Set in the early 90s, the novel covers, in great detail, a vampire attack at a Charleston carnival. A lot happens that night, and many characters contribute, so pay close attention. The narrative style -- a stream of consciousness, omniscient viewpoint -- must have been tricky to pull off, but it works well for this story. The narrator, Jameson, is a witch and stripper. As the author used to work as an exotic dancer, she is able to get right into Jameson's thoughts and world.



Mythic edited by Mike Allen

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

In this first volume of a new anthology series, the editor brings several aspects of the SF/fantasy field together, creating something that's neither fish nor fowl, but an enjoyable blend of both, kind of like a literary platypus: rich, strange, comical, confusing, thought-provoking and definitely memorable. Here are over a dozen talented writers bringing unique visions of fiction and poetry to life.



Le Morte d'Arthur: An Epic Limerick, Vol I by Jacob Wenzel

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Sir Thomas Mallory's Le Morte d'Arthur is the English language cornerstone of Arthurian lore. However trying to read the hundreds of pages can sometimes get so involved in deciphering the language that one loses the essentials of the plot and message. Here, however, we have Mallory retold in modern, slightly colloquial English, in limerick form.



Feeling Very Strange edited by James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

This is the second "please don't call us science fiction or fantasy" anthology of the summer. Unlike the "new wave fabulists" in Paraspheres, this collection is more firmly rooted in the genre; the editors are well-recognized SF&F authors in their own right, as are most of the anthologized writers. Moreover, the subtitle employs a term originated by Bruce Sterling back in 1989. This is "The Slipstream Anthology," though the stylistic variations among the selections don't help to clarify exactly what slipstream is. The editors themselves note that they weren't sure "there was such a thing as slipstream."



Lester Dent's Zeppelin Tales by Lester Dent

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

From the acid-crumbled pages of early depression era pulps comes, count 'em, not one, not two, but five pulp tales of dirigibles by the creator of the pulp icon Doc Savage. If you're looking for plausibility, subtlety, or deep insights into the human condition, you've come to the wrong place. This is pulp fiction, action for the sake of action, swell young dames mostly present to be saved by brawny pistol-in-the-fist heroes, and the usual complement of nefarious and sadistic villains of various non-Anglo-Saxon ethnicities.



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Rick offers his thoughts on surveys of online publications and the television work of Howard Chaykin.



The Hashish Man and Other Stories by Lord Dunsany

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

There is nothing here to startle modern sensibilities, but there is a great deal to captivate what was once called the poetic imagination. The lure of golden cities, far; the sense that horror may lurk unseen among the reeds beside a stream or beneath the cobblestones of a London street; the realization that the shadowy dinner guest of a young gentleman in an ornate restaurant is indeed Death, or that a private club down a quiet street might be the final retreat of gods who have lost their last worshippers, waited upon by kings who have lost their thrones.



Roger Corman: Metaphysics on a Shoestring by Alain Silver and James Ursini

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

From monster movies to epic pictures, from historical drama to tense thrillers, no man has directed or produced a more varied catalogue of film than Roger Corman. He has built his reputation on being a maverick filmmaker who doesn't play by Hollywood's rules. His decades-spanning career has lead to an incredible cult following and the helpful development of such filmmakers as James Cameron and Jonathan Demme.



A Small and Remarkable Life by Nick DiChario

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Set in rural New York in the 1860s, the novel tells the story of Tink Puddah's life and death. Mirroring Tink's life is the character of Jacob Piersol, the preacher in Skanoh Valley. Following in his father's footsteps, Jacob is constantly trying to prove himself his father's equal and sees Tink's failure to accept Christianity as one of his major failings. What Jacob doesn't know is that Tink, whom everyone in town refers to as a foreigner, is, in fact an alien.



To Hold Infinity by John Meaney

Wed, 16 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

On a partly terraformed colony world, Fulgar, a very high tech society has developed. The key to the society is an elite group called Luculenti, people who have been technologically enhanced by the addition of plexcores, artificial brains, in a sense. One of the leading Luculenti is Rafael Garcia de la Vega, but he is a psychopath, who has exploited some new technology to become a sort of mind vampire, capable of sucking the memories and personality of other Luculenti into his own illegally expanded set of plexcores.



The Bonehunters by Steven Erikson

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

In this sixth volume of Tales of the Malazan Book of the Fallen, the events of the Malazan campaigns on Genabackis and Seven Cities, the Tiste Edur conquest of the Letherii Empire, the machinations of the Malazan Empress, her allies and enemies, assassins and wizards, soldiers and priests, gods and ascendants, foundlings, slaves, refugees -- almost everyone we've met so far and everything that has happened is pulled together in this book. You won't find answers to all your questions, but you will be left with a sense that all these events we've been treated to thus far are not going to pass by without an even more profound impact on the world than we had already anticipated.



Dreams of the Compass Rose by Vera Nazarian

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

If you're looking for this book to be yet another instalment of the post-Tolkien fantasy paradigm, you'll be very disappointed. Similarly if you're looking for something of the China Mieville school of "New Weird" you won't find it here either. Think rather Burton's translation of The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, then add the twists of irony and gorgeous prose of Lord Dunsany's early tales, or Clark Ashton Smith.



Throne of Jade and Black Powder War by Naomi Novik

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Despite the length (400 pages apiece) somehow both these books feel a lot shorter and "lighter" than they ought to. His Majesty's Dragon, Book 1 of the Temeraire series, was a thoroughly wonderful book. The next two books in the series (one hesitates to call it a trilogy, seeing as the author has indicated that the series will continue) feel like... they should really have been one book.



His Majesty's Dragon by Naomi Novik

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

The novel opens with Captain Laurence, of the British Navy, capturing a French ship. On the captured ship they find a dragon's egg. Dragons are very valuable creatures, it turns out, and are used as a sort of Air Force by both sides. Dragons are intelligent, and are able to talk from the time they hatch, but they will typically bond with just one person, usually one of the first people they see upon hatching. This egg is about to hatch, and it is necessary for one of Laurence's officers to agree to bond with the dragon which is a problem.



Lady in the Water: a movie review by Rick Norwood

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Samuel R. Delany has written that enjoyment of art depends on the tension between the expected and the unexpected. Too much of the expected, we yawn. Too much of the unexpected, and we become confused. A lot of people evidently were confused by this highly enjoyable, completely original film. America is not ready for an urban fairy tale.



The Sound of Angels by Lisa Silverthorne

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

From a haunted airplane crash site to Martian caves, her prose contains just the right description to put you into her many imaginative locations. Even better, she puts you in the mind of her characters so that you understand them, despite how alien some of their lives are.



Clarke's Universe by Arthur C. Clarke

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

This is a collection of three stories by Arthur C. Clarke: one novel and two short stories. While in most cases when a collection like this is put together, there is some link between the stories, any link between "The Lion of Comarre," A Fall of Moondust, and "Jupiter V" is tenuous at best. All three are set in the future in our solar system and were written by Clarke, but that is about as far as the link goes.



The Clan Corporate by Charles Stross

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

This is the third of a continuing series of books that began with The Family Trade, followed by The Hidden Family. Miriam makes some political blunders trying to make space for herself, and she finds her mother not exactly on her side. To her despair, she finds herself threatened with marriage to the mentally handicapped younger son of the King. And she has made an enemy of the sadistic elder brother to her putative future husband. Mike Fleming is stunned by the revelations of the existence of a possibly inimical foreign government with agents that can literally disappear to another world.



10 Odd SF Classics compiled by Eric Walker

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Why is any "classic" speculative-fiction book ever overlooked? Sometimes it's because its author has produced some other work or works whose fame shadows it: there are three of those here. Sometimes it's because the author is not commonly thought of as a "speculative-fiction" writer: there are four of those here. And sometimes it's just a matter of the book or the author never having been noticed as it or he or she ought to be -- and there are three of those here.



Joe R. Lansdale's Lords of the Razor edited by Bill Sheehan and William Schafer

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Theme anthologies are tricky, especially when the subject is as narrow as the one generating the present volume: the horrific monster created about twenty years ago by Joe Lansdale for one of his early stories. Reproduced here, "God of the Razor" is a frightening tale of pure horror where the basement of an old, dilapidated house becomes the stage for the terrifying appearance of an evil creature apt to turn your blood into ice. Taking inspiration from this malevolent, superhuman character, a number of skilled genre writers have developed their personal nightmares.



Shuteye for the Timebroker by Paul Di Filippo

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Paul Di Filippo is a writer who likes to shift restlessly between styles and manners, though his most common mode is the humorous. Not outright comedy, but the sort of thing that leaves you smiling without necessarily understanding why. It's the sort of trick that writers like R.A. Lafferty and Howard Waldrop pull of with aplomb.



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Rick offers his movie predictions for what is worth seeing during the remainder of 2006, some material coming in the next few years and what is worth watching on TV in August.



Touch the Dark by Karen Chance

Tue, 1 Aug 2006 11:00:00 GMT

Cassandra Palmer is a virginal young woman who talks to dead people, and following the murder of her parents, was brought up in a vampire mafia family. Then she ran away. Tony, the undead godfather of the bloodsucking mob, is looking for her, along with other interested parties. The only advantage Cassie has to begin with is her ability to interact with ghosts, and to some extent make use of their ectoplasmic powers.



RSS Feeds

Sat, 1 Jan 2005 11:00:00 GMT

After constructing our first RSS feed, it soon became apparent that the size of files could grow quickly. We decided to separate them into smaller ones, breaking them up by month. On this page you will find RSS feed files for all of our content beginning with January 2005.