Subscribe: Andy Rowell | Church Leadership Conversations
http://www.andyrowell.net/andy_rowell/index.rdf
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
adobe connect  church  churches  congregations  download syllabus  online  powerpoint  recording  sessions  students  view  webex 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Andy Rowell | Church Leadership Conversations

Andy Rowell



Church Leadership Conversations



Updated: 2018-01-17T16:40:00-06:00

 



Tips on recording video for online courses and tips on teaching online

2018-01-18T17:23:58-06:00

Here is a Twitter thread: https://twitter.com/AndyRowell/status/953739633728290818 about recording videos for online courses and teaching online. Thoughts on recording lectures: on the one hand you can do narrated PowerPoint with no view of the lecturer. The other way is recording yourself...   Here is a Twitter thread: https://twitter.com/AndyRowell/status/953739633728290818 about recording videos for online courses and teaching online.  Thoughts on recording lectures: on the one hand you can do narrated PowerPoint with no view of the lecturer. The other way is recording yourself on webcam with no PowerPoint. I have been using Screencast-O-Matic and can toggle between PowerPoint with webcam small to webcam big. I also am recording a copy on Audacity and exporting it as an MP3 so students have the option of just listening to the lecture rather than watching the YouTube version. Wow is it easy to cut off the beginning and end of a recording with Audacity. A huge question of course is whether students will listen to your recorded lectures or watch your videos. Like most things, it probably depends on to what extent they're required for their success on the graded assignments. Students would watch probably if the lectures were short and as good as a movie or as funny as Trevor Noah. I changed my approach with PowerPoint to basically removing all words and quotes and summaries and just leaving photos. I am looking at my old PowerPoint with all of that stuff on another laptop as my notes while I record. So I advance 2 slides each time. I tried to record my videos in different places that approximately fit the theme of the lecture in order to give the students some variety. The first priority is a quiet place so for example, church sanctuaries, offices, home dining room, church and university lobbies. To film, I brought in a roller bag: two lamps to shine in my face https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00YP4A1U6 …, extension cord, power bar, two laptops, Blue Snowball USB mic https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000EOPQ7E/ … and pop filter / wind screen (to stop p b "pops"), shoeboxes for elevating laptops, and shirt change. My school, Bethel University, has a professional studio and a full-time film-maker "Lead Media Designer" in Teaching & Learning Technology but there is a 4 month production wait and I'm needing videos for five different online courses during January and Spring this year. In the past, I used 30-60 minute weekly online synchronous sessions via Adobe Connect or WebEx. I surveyed students via Doodle on time(s) that worked for everyone. If students missed a session, they had to write a response to the recording. I still think this is a good approach. I have now moved to recording lectures with Screencast-O-matic and posting to YouTube. I use 30-min synchronous sessions via Adobe Connect or WebEx for discussion on webcams of a case study or poll that probes student learning. If they miss, they write response to the recording. Other tips on online teaching: I recommend shorter more frequent papers rather than really long ones. I have students post their papers in a forum (on the course site) and require students to read and respond to the papers of two other people. Two replies are part of their grade. I have students go interview a pastor they respect or a pastor of different denomination or a non-Christian or a missionary and report back with a post or video in the forum about what they learned instead of booking guest speakers or panels as I do in the face-to-face classroom. By the way, the next stage after recording a course full of lectures is probably to write this stuff up as a book / booklet. That way, even if students don't watch your videos, it is accessible to those who are interested in what you have to say! [...]



Initial impressions of WebEx for online teaching

2018-01-31T13:42:06-06:00

Here is my tweet storm about trying Cisco WebEx. 1/ I used WebEx for the first time tonight after using Adobe Connect for synchronous online sessions for 4.5 years. Our school has moved to WebEx. I did 30 minute sessions...   Here is my tweet storm about trying Cisco WebEx.  1/ I used WebEx for the first time tonight after using Adobe Connect for synchronous online sessions for 4.5 years. Our school has moved to WebEx. I did 30 minute sessions with 8 and 10 students. 2/ See this whole tweetstorm and my note to my students beforehand at: http://www.andyrowell.net/andy_rowell/2018/01/initial-impressions-of-webex.html 3/ I was hugely relieved to learn that with WebEx as many as 500 can be on webcam at once. https://collaborationhelp.cisco.com/article/en-us/WBX000019846 I had read somewhere else only 7 simultaneous video feeds. I usually need between 8 and 20.  4/ Negative: I'm sitting here waiting to be emailed the WebEx recordings. "An email notification is sent to you when the recording is available." https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-10501 Did they really record?! How long does it take? With Adobe Connect, the recordings are available immediately.  UPDATE: No email was sent. The recordings showed up in my My Training Recordings in the Training Center 6.5 hours and 5.5 hours later at 3 am. But the next recording and the subsequent four appeared less than 30 minutes after the session ended. Does a new account like mine need time to warm up? The recordings show the webcam relatively small and the PowerPoint quite large. It does not show the chat.    5/ The WebEx webcam video feeds look better than Adobe Connect. But the viewing window is harder to navigate. The "Participants" webcam view in WebEx is triggered by who speaks. So you see the person who is speaking. 6/ In WebEx, you have to maximize the Participants video window to see everyone on webcams. But if you do that, you can't see the PowerPoint being displayed. In the default view, it is easy to accidentally cover the Participants (webcams) panel with the Chat panel. 7/ So far I have not figured out how in WebEx to see people on webcam ("participants"), and chat and the PowerPoint. You can more easily resize windows in Adobe Connect. Update 1/31/2018: One important tip is to encourage students to expand Participants panel to full screen. THEY are able to also see the PowerPoint slides in this view while also seeing all of the people on webcam. They can also use the Poll or Chat from this view by clicking on the top. They can in this view resize the different panels, etc. HOWEVER, the presenter cannot see the PowerPoint in this view unless they choose it from above. SO, presenters (like me) don't realize that encouraging students to go to Participants full screen view is recommended as the presenter mistakenly thinks that this means that students can no longer see the PowerPoint BUT THEY CAN (because the poor presenter cannot initially see the PowerPoint in Participants full screen view unless they enable it manually). 8/ In Adobe Connect, it is easier to scroll through your PowerPoint. In WebEx, you cannot press the arrow keys on your keyboard. 9/ I would not submit your participants' email addresses ("Invite attendees") or WebEx will send them emails any time you change the slightest thing with a session. Or be careful with the settings. I say communicate with your participants through your regular means. 10/ In WebEx, if you are the host and you close "exit" a meeting, poof, the session is gone. Everyone is kicked off. Not good for clumsy hosts. 11/ WebEx is also finicky with regard to scheduling. It thinks it knows better than you. So, no scheduling a meeting once for say Jan 1, 2018 and just coming back and reusing it. No, no, no, that date is past and so the scheduling is denied. 12/ With WebEx, your overwhelmed participants need a different URL for every single meeting unless repeating very precisely. For example, no two (discussion group options) on one day. No skipping the password or customizing the URL [...]



APEST and discussion about functions in the church

2017-04-26T12:38:32-05:00

I commented on a post written by Bob Robinson and introduced by Scot McKnight at Scot's blog: Evaluating the APEST Theory of Church Flourishing (Bob Robinson) I enjoyed all these comments. It seems like the first point about the application...I commented on a post written by Bob Robinson and introduced by Scot McKnight at Scot's blog: Evaluating the APEST Theory of Church Flourishing (Bob Robinson) I enjoyed all these comments. It seems like the first point about the application of Granville Sharp's Rule to Eph 4:11 has been disproven, which perhaps merits a retraction or correction in the post above. I do not want to defend the prooftexting use of APEST but I think Bob is incorrect in saying: "Paul talks to Timothy and Titus about the importance of 'presbyteroi' ('elders') and 'episkopoi' ('bishops' or 'overseers.'). These were the key leaders of the early church." I would say in response that the significance of the apostle Paul and his delegate Timothy are assumed in the Pastoral Epistles and therefore it is not the case that the most significant role in the early church were overseers and elders. The most significant role was the apostles. See Gordon D. Fee, "Reflections on Church Order in the Pastoral Epistles," in Listening to the Spirit in the Text (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2000), 156. Gordon D. Fee, "Laos and Leadership Under the New Covenant," in Listening to the Spirit in the Text (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2000), 142. There is good reason to retain the missionary emphasis of the "apostle." However, the lists of gifts, functions, and roles in the New Testament vary greatly and give little suggestion that individuals should try to discern their precise label so one should be very cautious with emphasizing titles, labels, self-assessments, etc. The majority of the Christian tradition give little attention to APE roles. The so-called ecumenical consensus is described in the 1982 Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry World Council of Churches document: three offices: overseers (bishops), elders (presbyters), and deacons (with apostle seen as morphing into bishop). I think Gordon Fee is correct that overseers and deacons were sub-sets of the larger category: elders. “The elders in the local churches seem to have been composed of both episkopoi (overseers) and diakonoi (deacons).”Gordon D. Fee, "Laos and Leadership under the New Covenant," in Listening to the Spirit in the Text (Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans, 2000), 141. “The term ‘elders’ is probably a covering term for both overseers and deacons.”Gordon D. Fee, "Reflections on Church Order in the Pastoral Epistles," in Listening to the Spirit in the Text (Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans, 2000), 157. There is also explicitly in the Reformed tradition a cessationist view of apostles, prophets, and evangelists. John Calvin writes, “According to this interpretation (which seems to me to be in agreement with both the words and opinion of Paul, those three functions [apostles, prophets, and evangelists in Eph 4:11] were not established in the church as permanent ones, but only for that time during which churches were to be erected where none existed before” (Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, Book IV, Chapter III, Section 4, Beveridge translation, p. 1057). My point is that the APE roles were dismissed for poor exegetical and Christendom reasons and should be recovered. The apostle is conversionary, cross-cultural and community-forming (John G. Flett, Apostolicity: The Ecumenical Question in World Christian Perspective (Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, 2016), 302-305, 318, 324). [...]



Doctorate finished

2016-11-08T16:09:58-06:00

Yesterday, I defended my dissertation at Duke. Yay.

Yesterday, I defended my dissertation at Duke. Yay.

  (image)

(image)




My 2015-2016 Ministry Leadership syllabi at Bethel Seminary

2016-02-23T13:35:09-06:00

Here are some of my syllabi from the 2015-2016 school year at Bethel Seminary. Introduction to Transformational Leadership (hybrid of online with synchronous sessions and intensive) Download 00 Syllabus ML523 Rowell 2015-09-30 Organizational Leadership and Church Governance (traditional) Download 00...Here are some of my syllabi from the 2015-2016 school year at Bethel Seminary.    Introduction to Transformational Leadership (hybrid of online with synchronous sessions and intensive) Download 00 Syllabus ML523 Rowell 2015-09-30   Organizational Leadership and Church Governance (traditional) Download 00 Syllabus ML615 Rowell 2015-09-30   The Global Mission of the Church (fully online with synchronous sessions) Download 00 Syllabus ML632 Rowell 2015-09-30   Contemporary Models of the Church (fully online with synchronous sessions) Download 00 Syllabus ML714 Rowell 2015-09-30   Discipleship in Community (traditional) Download 00 Syllabus ML506 Trad Spring Rowell 2016-02-04   Missional Outreach and Evangelism (traditional) Download 00 Syllabus ML507 Trad Spring Rowell 2016-02-03   You can see required textbooks at Bethel Seminary at:  http://bookstore.mbsdirect.net/bethelseminary.htm [...]



The significance of a rise in nondenominational churches and multi-site churches

2015-12-09T12:10:25-06:00

The National Congregations Study report from December 2015 (page 5): "The NCS shows . . . an increase in . . . congregations that claim no denominational affiliation. Unaffiliated congregations increased from 18% in 1998 to 24% in 2012, and...The National Congregations Study report from December 2015 (page 5):  "The NCS shows . . . an increase in . . . congregations that claim no denominational affiliation. Unaffiliated congregations increased from 18% in 1998 to 24% in 2012, and the share of churchgoers in those independent congregations increased from 10% in 1998 to 15% in 2012 . . . Non-denominationalism occurs mainly among white evangelical and black Protestant traditions, with 30% of white evangelical Protestant and 25% of black Protestant congregations claiming no official denominational connection in 2012. Independent congregations also tend to be newer than others, with the median congregation founded only 25 years ago versus 82 years ago for affiliated congregations."  One comment about non-denominational churches is that they have "congregational" polity. That is, they are are independent as opposed to being "connectional." Baptist and Pentecostal churches are quite similar to nondenominational churches in that they too are usually "congregational" meaning the local church makes virtually all of the decisions. The good of churches that are "congregational" in polity is that they can be nimble and relate well to the local culture. The "connectional" churches often get their guidelines from denominational headquarters which are sometimes dated and irrelevant. However, "congregational" churches can become "cults" because there is little outside accountability. They often don't realize that they need an "association" or "denomination" until a pastor leaves or there is some other crisis. Whereas "connectional" churches have a structure designed for stability and perpetuity.  I urge nondenominational churches and churches with "congregational" polity to find best practices from other denominations. I think especially here of good policies regarding handling accusations of sexual abuse rather than winging it. It is ignorant and arrogant to flout one's independence as a congregation as if you couldn't possibly learn from other congregations. 1 Cor 14:36 NIV: "Or did the word of God originate with you? Or are you the only people it has reached?" Another way for nondenominational churches to learn best practices is for their ministry staff to get theological education. I highly encourage nondenominational churches to have many staff get seminary training so they they nurture a "deep bench" of wisdom from which to draw. I worry about megachurches where only the founder and a teaching pastor have theological education and call the shots and the rest of the ministry staff "execute" their orders. What will happen when the founder falls, leaves, or dies? Why not have lots of ministry staff up and down the organization get grounded in the wisdom of the church globally and historically? Why not have a 30 staff who can pick up the slack rather than one or two more designated hand-picked successors who are teaching pastors?   A nondenominational congregation can also join a denomination that supports congregational polity (Converge Worldwide, Evangelical Free Church, Evangelical Covenant Church, CCCC, Southern Baptist Convention, Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Assemblies of God, Vineyard USA, etc.). They can provide support and advice if a crisis should occur regarding abuse, finances and can provide assistance after a pastor leaves.  On the other hand, denominational churches, that is churches with episcopal or presbyterian polity, should beware of hampering local effectiveness of congregations with bureaucracy and red tape.    Note too this from the National Congregations Study (page 11):  "Multisite Congregations. The development and proliferation of multisite congrega[...]



Trinitarian Theology and Management Literature Joke

2015-11-25T00:12:26-06:00

God the Spirit offered to go commission Moses. But God the Father said, "No, we need to get the right person on the bush." Inspired by: Jim Collins "get the right person on the bus" (Good to Great). and Andy...

God the Spirit offered to go commission Moses. But God the Father said, "No, we need to get the right person on the bush."

 

Inspired by: Jim Collins "get the right person on the bus" (Good to Great).

and

 

 Andy Rowell Retweeted

Just wrote down something about Moses encountering the "burning bus," which is an interesting concept

1 retweet3 likes
 
 
 

 

 




Pastors vs. Professors use of Twitter

2015-11-25T00:58:14-06:00

I think Twitter is for pastors much less useful than it is for professors. Andy Rowell ‏@AndyRowell 38m38 minutes agoMinneapolis, MN How large church pastors tweet: UPBEAT sermon one-liners, church, book, guest appearance promotion, vacations, sports. Avoid controversial. 1 retweet2...I think Twitter is for pastors much less useful than it is for professors. Andy Rowell ‏@AndyRowell  38m38 minutes agoMinneapolis, MN How large church pastors tweet: UPBEAT sermon one-liners, church, book, guest appearance promotion, vacations, sports. Avoid controversial.   1 retweet2 likes Reply   Retweet   1     Like   2   View Tweet activity   More   Andy Rowell ‏@AndyRowell  23m23 minutes agoMinneapolis, MN A large church pastor's role is to present polished message via sermon; processing on Twitter results in misinterpretation & thus, detracts.   0 retweets0 likes Reply   Retweet         Like       View Tweet activity   More   Andy Rowell ‏@AndyRowell  15m15 minutes agoMinneapolis, MN Whereas professors find students (who have time and space to process) learn (even conservative ideas) best by reflecting on controversy.   0 retweets0 likes Reply   Retweet         Like       View Tweet activity   More   Andy Rowell ‏@AndyRowell  3m3 minutes agoMinneapolis, MN Pastors are wary of Twitter detracting from main message; for professors it is a great source of current examples for engaging students.   0 retweets0 likes Reply   Retweet         Like       View Tweet activity   More [...]