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Last Build Date: Sun, 19 Nov 2017 03:29:49 +0000

 



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 06 by Bret Hooper

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 03:29:49 +0000

"Who’d compile (by hand) a 200 (two hundred) pages long report in the first place? . . . . Besides – there was no concept of “pages” in the official documents back then. Even if something would end up written on different leaves of (expensive, rare) paper or even vellum they’d be then glued together into one scroll. I assume Lytt's information is correct, and it is nice to have that additional info, but the authors' responsibility is to move the story along and supply the info needed to understand with a minimal info dump. Specifically, "a 200-page report" gives the modern reader the correct idea that it was a very lengthy report. "True, for the first time this Magnetic Anomaly had been described in 1773. . . ." Is there adequate evidence to prove that nothing in writing and no person in Grantville knew of the Anomaly, or that such knowledge never left Grantville in the direction of Russia? Who in the 1636 possessed both the working knowledge, will, resources and expertise[sic]" (emphasis added) Presumably, no one in 1636 had both of the four attributes, (1)working knowledge), (2)will, (3)resources, and (4)expertise, and neither did the first humans to extract and use iron. They gained some of these by trial and error as they went along, but never attained the twentieth century levels of any. Even today, people gain expertise as much or more from experience as from book-learning. I am technically qualified to teach linguistics in college. Lytt's posting clearly indicates the lack of such qualification. (1) In english, both applies to two (2), not four items. (2)"Because “Vlad” is not a short/diminutive form of “Vladimir”." As any competent linguist knows, if people use "Vlad" as a short/diminutive form of "Vladimir," it thereby becomes such. Whether or not it was so used in 1637, it has apparently become so, as evidenced by the fact that it appears in print in the book.






Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 06 by Lyttenburgh

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 02:24:16 +0000

IIRC (people with the book on hand – feel free to correct me) the aforementioned “Marat Davidovich” is not just the head of knyazhna Gorchakova men-at-arms, but also, by the virtue of Natalia being the only Gorchakov remaining – the head of all household troops (don’t ask me – ask the authors) for a very long time already. Leaving aside for the moment the fact, that neither “Vlad” nor Natalia existed in reality (no matter which branch of princely Gorchakovs – btw, authors so far did not allow themselves such liberty when “handling” other European nobles) – just how plausible the whole situation is compared to reality? Not much, no matter what aspect to review. Instead of trying to find some excuses for the authors, already infamous for don’t giving a proper thought to history and facts, instead of trying to find this or that justification, it’s much more plausible to admit – the authors (probably, due to their laziness) did not care and counted that their readership will consume literally everything penned by them. Which is not a bad approach on itself – if you write fantasy and not history fiction sub-genre.



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 06 by Al Viro

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 23:36:24 +0000

FWIW, while their handling of names is atrocious, it's not an impossible combination; e.g. Murat Davut-ogly would almost certainly end up with an equivalent of "Davidovich" for patronymic and keeping "Marat" as the common-use name is also likely, whatever patron saint he'd have. The real problem is different - to use '-vich' form (instead of "Marat Davydov") he'd have to either come from a foreign noble family recognized as such at conversion time (not impossible, but then his status would've been much higher than described) or to pull off something *very* impressive on his own, earning the right to use that... Said that, the names used by authors are obviously no better than random placeholders. Kinda-sorta plausible for 20c Russia (so far - sample chapters on baen.com contain at least one example with an impossible combination of suffices), but absolutely anachronistic for 17c...



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 06 by Andy

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 21:33:17 +0000

It's a little ironic that you wonder who would compose a 200 page report.



Comment on 1636 The Vatican Sanctions – Snippet 21 by Terranovan

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 23:12:29 +0000

Good. Pedro wasn’t thorough enough with tying up loose ends. And his paranoia about Ruy was well founded.



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 06 by Lyttenburgh

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 20:42:09 +0000

*Judos - Kudos.



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 06 by Lyttenburgh

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 20:40:32 +0000

“Brandy was now working her way through a two-hundred page report on resource exploitation in Russia” Judos for her valiant attempts! 17 c. Russian looked like that: http://expositions.nlr.ru/eng/ABC/images/37.jpg ^ A grammar book, 1653 That’s before Petrine reforms, which made language more resembling the modern one: http://b1.culture.ru/c/635652.jpg ^ “Vedomosti”, first Russian mass produced newspaper (est. 1703). Who’d compile (by hand) a 200 (two hundred) pages long report in the first place? Who’d even think of making a copy of it (by hand) and send to anyone else? Why? Besides – there was no concept of “pages” in the official documents back then. Even if something would end up written on different leaves of (expensive, rare) paper or even vellum they’d be then glued together into one scroll. “Iron production was up significantly, especially in the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly area” True, for the first time this Magnetic Anomaly had been described in 1773. But only a century of observations and research it’d been mapped properly and the technology developed to the sufficient level to tap into the mineral wealth within. First samples of the iron ore had been extracted only in 1923… after boring as deep as 167 meters (550 feet). Modern day mines in the region are, of course, much, much deeper. Question time! Who in the 1636 possessed both the working knowledge, will, resources and expertise to accomplish just that? Besides – take a look at the political map of the early 17 c. Kursk, Voronezh and Belgorod (especially Belgorod) were right here on the border with the PLC. You do not establish a strategic mineral extracting enterprises in the potential warzone. There was a reason why the Ural had been chose instead in the OTL. “There was a new iron mine south of Moscow, and more mines in other places, all as a result of the information provided from the Ring of Fire.” Did these encyclopedias also magic(k)ally turned people into professional geologists and expert mine-builders? Because maps are not enough. “…made the government and the new industrial class realize the investment of resources in mining was worthwhile” Where and when did there appear a “new industrial class” in Russia? How did it appear without first the appearance of the professional tradespeople, who’d know how to build and maintain said mines? The authors desire to have a pre-set “world” of theirs soooo much, that they ignore as “unimportant” pesky reality on the “how we got from here to there” way of explanation. “It was a mix of streltzi — the city guards or foot soldiers, deti boyars — the retainers of the great houses, and the dvoriane — the service nobility, soldiers and bureaucrats who kept the gears of Russia turning.” So the authors understanding of basically ALL strata of the political elite is just wrong, not only of deti boyarskiye. “All of that would have been fine, but the laborers in those new mines and factories were mostly serfs, and sometimes outright slaves” “Slaves”? “SLAVES”? Someone is too lazy to find even the basic facts about the serfdom in Russia in 17th c. Or is simply lazy AND projecting pre-set tropes, in order to get the “pre-set world” of theirs (which has no connection to reality) in order to have their own “authentic” “Great Trek Eastward”. Why the authors didn’t even read the basic history, about Petrine reforms and what steps did he take in his first Russian industrialization? “You know who I think is drowning, Vlad?” I know! The authors in Russian grammar! Because “Vlad” is not a short/diminutiv[...]



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 05 by Lyttenburgh

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 18:27:19 +0000

That's a bit closer, but Ufa at that time was smaller. How do they plan to feed and supply any large group of the people, especially the military?



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 06 by Bret Hooper

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 09:37:44 +0000

Could the folks from Ruzuka see and follow the balloon?