Subscribe: Comments for Eric Flint's place on the web
http://www.ericflint.net/index.php/comments/feed/
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
authors  books  call vengeance  comment call  comment  don  future  people  snippet  vengeance –  – snippet     
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Comments for Eric Flint's place on the web

Comments for The official home page of author Eric Flint



News, announcements, and snippets from Eric Flint



Last Build Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2018 10:03:53 +0000

 



Comment on A Call To Vengeance – Snippet 04 by Daryl Saal

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 10:03:53 +0000

Just one Roland handwaviumed back in time.



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 32 by Lyttenburgh

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 17:26:32 +0000

"...and was – according to story – not very “Czarish” beforehand anyway..." ^This. This is the main problem here. Who are they trying to portray here? A new cuddly, commoner/uptimer-friendly version of Nicholas II?



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 32 by Obelix

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 17:09:29 +0000

Lyttenburgh, don't forget: A single person act differently than you expect from historical background. That includes a Czar who has lost his throne, has been freed by a group including an uptimer valued for his opinions by the nobility in his group, and was - according to story - not very "Czarish" beforehand anyway. Ok, there would still be limits, but ... with behaviour of a key people in the story I would really give the authors a little bit more slack.



Comment on A Call To Vengeance – Snippet 01 by Lyttenburgh

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 12:09:12 +0000

“Meaning, he gets something out of them despite his complaints” Why, yes, I do! I get the urge to find out the truth, instead of the incredulous pastiche presented before me by this or that author. This snippets provide the impulse, but it is me who does the work and research. What I don’t understand – why there are not as many others like me? What, are you content with being fed just about anything, without processing and thinking it over?



Comment on A Call To Vengeance – Snippet 01 by Lyttenburgh

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 12:04:20 +0000

“There was been thousands of people “using logic to predict the future” and extremely few of them have succeeded in predicting “what the future was like”.” Good thing that I’m not one of them ;) I’m only saying that predicting such things (especially by blindly extrapolating the current trends) is a sheer folly. Or should I refer you to “The Napoleon of Notting Hill” (1904) by Gilbert K. Chesterton? “The human race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children's games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is a nuisance for the few people who grow up. And one of the games to which it is most attached is called "Keep to-morrow dark," and which is also named (by the rustics in Shropshire, I have no doubt) "Cheat the Prophet." The players listen very carefully and respectfully to all that the clever men have to say about what is to happen in the next generation. The players then wait until all the clever men are dead, and bury them nicely. They then go and do something else. That is all. For a race of simple tastes, however, it is great fun. “But in the beginning of the twentieth century the game of Cheat the Prophet was made far more difficult than it had ever been before. The reason was, that there were so many prophets and so many prophecies, that it was difficult to elude all their ingenuities… “…[T]he way the prophets of the twentieth century went to work was this. They took something or other that was certainly going on in their time, and then said that it would go on more and more until something extraordinary happened. And very often they added that in some odd place that extraordinary thing had happened, and that it showed the signs of the times. …All these clever men were prophesying with every variety of ingenuity what would happen soon, and they all did it in the same way, by taking something they saw "going strong," as the saying is, and carrying it as far as ever their imagination could stretch. This, they said, was the true and simple way of anticipating the future. …Then the wise men grew like wild things, and swayed hither and thither, crying, "What can it be? What can it be? What will London be like a century hence? Is there anything we have not thought of? Houses upside down – more hygienic, perhaps? Men walking on hands – make feet flexible, don't you know? Moon... motor-cars... no heads..." And so they swayed and wondered until they died and were buried nicely.” “But intelligent people know that the authors aren’t going to “rewrite” their books “just because one person thinks that the author made a mistake”.” 1) What if there is more than one? 2) What if there is, indeed, just one person, noticing how parochial, cheesy and incredulous the series have become, or at least only one who dares to say that? What does it say about the rest? “The snippets are made to influence the readers’ choice of “what books should they purchase”” Splendid. “IMO people who read these snippets largely don’t enjoy nit-pickers especially those who can’t find anything good in the snippets.” Are you speaking on behalf of all those people? Can you support your claim? If not – you are just usurping the right of others to speak on their behalf. This ties nicely with: “Lyttenburgh, IMO you have shown in your posts a Superior Attitude toward people who respond to your nit-picking.” Drak Bibliophile, it was you who made the following claim, which I quote: “You have decided that your “tastes in reading” are superior to anybody else’s “tast[...]



Comment on A Call To Vengeance – Snippet 01 by Jeff Ehlers

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 03:00:39 +0000

Hear hear, Drak. I just got done rereading the Bobiverse books, and Lyttenburgh reminds me of one of the characters in the third book. No matter what the subject matter is, he must be right, anyone who disagrees with him must be wrong, and the only thing that matters is proving it (and thus 'winning') no matter how he ends up looking as a result. The irony is that, for all that he complains about the stuff he thinks the author should have done differently, he still reads the snippets, and most likely the completed books as well. Meaning, he gets something out of them despite his complaints. Something to keep in mind when reading his latest posts on a given snippet, for sure.



Comment on A Call To Vengeance – Snippet 01 by Drak Bibliophile

Sun, 21 Jan 2018 17:49:54 +0000

There was been thousands of people "using logic to predict the future" and extremely few of them have succeeded in predicting "what the future was like". The authors of SF aren't in the business of "predicting the future" but are in the business of writing books that plenty of people will buy and enjoy reading. Yes, any of us can express an opinion of the authors' works and may express that opinion to the authors. But intelligent people know that the authors aren't going to "rewrite" their books "just because one person thinks that the author made a mistake". Most authors have "beta readers" who are people that the authors trust to make valid criticisms of their work. This site is not set up to "help the authors make their work better". The snippets are made to influence the readers' choice of "what books should they purchase". IMO people who read these snippets largely don't enjoy nit-pickers especially those who can't find anything good in the snippets. Lyttenburgh, IMO you have shown in your posts a Superior Attitude toward people who respond to your nit-picking. As for "Low and High Culture", there has always existed Snobs who decide what "High Culture Is". I don't care about "Low and High Culture". I just care about "do I enjoy it?" I also don't care if somebody else didn't enjoy it as long as that somebody doesn't make an ass of himself by telling me that I'm wrong to enjoy it.



Comment on A Call To Vengeance – Snippet 01 by Lyttenburgh

Sat, 20 Jan 2018 19:11:20 +0000

“The above quote is why many people (including me) don’t like your posts.” I’m fine with this. “There is no way to prove what societies 600 years (or even 50 years) in the future will be like.” True. Yet we can assume one thing with certainty – they won’t be copies of the here and now. These societies of the future will be different, and there would be reasons (cause and effect, remember?) for that. “But you imagine that You Know The Future and everything you don’t like in a fictional portrayal of the Future is “Obviously Wrong”.” I don’t know the future. I can make an educated deduction and produce some arguments, while certain portrayals of the “future” could be wrong though. “You have decided that your “tastes in reading” are superior to anybody else’s “tastes in reading”.” Where I did that? That’s serious accusation here, so I can expect some kind of answer. So – where did I claim that my, and I quote you, “tastes in reading” are *superior* to anybody else’s “tastes in reading” “So what? People’s tastes vary and there is no way to “prove” which is better.” Taste is one matter and there could be no 100% agreement among the people, that’s true. But are you denying the existence, e.g., of the “High” and “Low” culture? “I’m not arrogant enough to claim that “my tastes are obviously superior” and I’m not arrogant enough to claim that “my views of the future are obviously correct”.” Again, I have to ask you to provide quotes from my comments when I claim such things. Everyone here is free to go and provide their own arguments why, in their opinion, the future might indeed be like that as portrayed. But I will respond to them as well. “If I don’t like what the authors are doing in their books, I just don’t read those books.” But, surely, nothing prevents you from saying what you like and what you don’t like in said books, so that authors (might!) benefit from such feedback?



Comment on A Call To Vengeance – Snippet 01 by Drak Bibliophile

Sat, 20 Jan 2018 15:13:19 +0000

Lyttenburgh Quote I.e. you can’t prove your point, and instead of agreeing that you are wrong and I’m right, you try to use face saving “let’s agree to disagree” trick. Got it. End Quote The above quote is why many people (including me) don't like your posts. There is no way to prove what societies 600 years (or even 50 years) in the future will be like. But you imagine that You Know The Future and everything you don't like in a fictional portrayal of the Future is "Obviously Wrong". On the other hand, your comments about "cheap tricks" about what the authors do are another matter which IMO is even worse. You have decided that your "tastes in reading" are superior to anybody else's "tastes in reading". There are plenty of books that I don't like especially the containing themes that the authors chose to use. and other people enjoy. There are plenty of books that I like but other people dislike. So what? People's tastes vary and there is no way to "prove" which is better. I often say (when there is disagreement in taste) "YMMV". IE Your Mileage May Vary. I'm not arrogant enough to claim that "my tastes are obviously superior" and I'm not arrogant enough to claim that "my views of the future are obviously correct". If I don't like what the authors are doing in their books, I just don't read those books.



Comment on 1637 The Volga Rules – Snippet 31 by Lyttenburgh

Sat, 20 Jan 2018 09:00:46 +0000

“Uh… This is a novel, not a historical book.” Correction – that’s a novel set in a distinct historical period. As such it must portray it correctly. Maybe not to the highest standards of the academic works, but accurately. So, yes, this makes it (in a way) a historical book. Alternative history, but history nonetheless. “It is an accepted – nay, the preferred – literary technique to worldbuild, say, just mentioning a rank of “captain” when no such rank existed OTL – instead of talking about them.” Accepted by whom? If they want to “worldbuild” – go ahead with the fantasy and build your own world from the scratch. Or try to portray the “regressed colony” society in the vein of the King David’s Spaceship. But you base your novel on reality – no matter how alt-hist- stick to it. “Going in to the detail of every single change would be excruciatingly boring.” Jumping to conclusions that make no sense whatsoever is excruciatingly stupid – as demonstrated by this book time and again “Tell me, Lytt, have you ever read a work of fiction?” Yes, I did. If you read my some other comments, you can surmise as much. Now, that I answered your question, how about some quid pro quo? Can you describe to me, Johnny, what you like the most in this particular novel? What elements constitute the “pull factor” for you?