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Preview: Comments on Grumpy Old Bookman: Reflections on our Times

Comments on Grumpy Old Bookman: Reflections on our Times





Updated: 2018-02-08T04:57:35.305+00:00

 



Adults' reading Harry, way to go... In 2050 they'r...

2007-07-31T10:51:00.000+01:00

Adults' reading Harry, way to go... In 2050 they're filling coloring books...



My goodness, read some Potter! She's writing in th...

2007-07-31T01:04:00.000+01:00

My goodness, read some Potter! She's writing in the tradition of the Inklings, and she's hilarious.



For some enlightening information about the Iowa w...

2007-07-30T21:26:00.000+01:00

For some enlightening information about the Iowa workshops, I suggest the Introduction to Madison Smartt Bell's Narrative Design. Apparently, a great deal of the pressure to conform to the workshop's style comes not from the instructors, but from the students themselves. Sad.



Might not Mr Appleyard's 'one simple reason' for a...

2007-07-30T19:25:00.000+01:00

Might not Mr Appleyard's 'one simple reason' for applying to the University of Iowa be the opportunity to study with Mrs Robinson, who just happens to teach at the Workshop? If she taught at the University of Wisconsin, I think Mr Appleyard would say attending the University of Wisconsin in order to study with Mrs Robinson is 'what every aspiring young writer in the world should do':

'This is what every aspiring young writer in the world should do, for one simple reason. At Iowa University is the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop is Marilynne Robinson, author of two novels, Housekeeping and Gilead, and a collection of essays, The Death of Adam, and not only one of the greatest writers alive, but one of the greatest teachers of writing.'



excellent post, i enjoyed it especially as i first...

2007-07-30T18:53:00.000+01:00

excellent post, i enjoyed it especially as i first read The Yard's essays on-line today, from his blog, and my gut reaction to his lauding of the creative writing bollocks was to recoil with a catlike hiss of disgust.

To be fair, on a fairly quick read of The Yard's piece, i think he's such a Marilynn Robinson fan that he feels any writer with some talent could learn from her.

For myself i tend to agree with Cormac McCarthy, who lived in (relative) poverty, rejecting grand Creative Writing professorships with the astute "it's a hustle". What i've read of Robinson was marvellous but i've serious doubt about how much anyone can learn about writing from explicit instruction, rather than reading a lot, living a lot, and writing a lot.



Wilson says it more than well. I don't know why I...

2007-07-30T18:04:00.000+01:00

Wilson says it more than well. I don't know why I have yet to read a Potter book. Perhaps I'm afraid I'll feel like a kid again.



Good Morning Sir and thank you for your reflection...

2007-07-30T16:37:00.000+01:00

Good Morning Sir and thank you for your reflections upon the current state of American collegiate litr'ry youth and their abundant narcissism. The arrogance of geekdom smothers so much and as colonialists perhaps we harbour an unconscious envy of the esteemed intellect branded for so long and so well by our mother nation Britain. No quarrel here, we could use a dose of humility quite often. Perhaps you could help me with my understanding of the term "self-esteem" as I am perhaps handicapped by the use of the RWD (Random House World Dictionary). Also, having read Nathaniel Branden's "The Six Pillars of Self-Esteem", I've come to believe that this term, self-esteem, is misused quite often to imply the quantity of self-respect one possesses, as opposed to the quality of one's self-estimations. RWD suggests that it is the proper esteem or regard for one's dignity of character. Thus it becomes a question of the accuracy of one's self-estimation. A person of modest abilities, such as myself, could be said to possess good self-esteem should I express proper or accurate humility, and as such one who possesses poor self-esteem could indicate either arrogance or deprecation, or am I splitting hairs here between connotation and definition?