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Preview: Steve Hargadon's Posts - Classroom 2.0

Steve Hargadon's Posts - Classroom 2.0





Updated: 2018-02-24T02:56:42Z

 



The Divided Stories of Education Reform, Personal Cognitive Revolutions, and New Superheroes

2010-11-05T19:59:40.000Z

A few months ago I interviewed John Taylor Gatto for my “Future of Education” interview series. From 1989-1991 Mr. Gatto was recognized as the New York City teacher of the year, as well in 1991 as the New York State teacher of the year. In the summer of 1991 he retired abrubptly, and in a very public way: in an op-ed piece published… A few months ago I interviewed John Taylor Gatto for my “Future of Education” interview series. From 1989-1991 Mr. Gatto was recognized as the New York City teacher of the year, as well in 1991 as the New York State teacher of the year. In the summer of 1991 he retired abrubptly, and in a very public way: in an op-ed piece published in the Wall Street Journal where he claimed by being a part of the public school system he was harming students more than helping them. His 1992 book, Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling then became a seminal work of the homeschool movement, but was not widely known in traditional education circles. What struck me as I interviewed Mr. Gatto was how much his message—that factory-model schooling was not just ineffective but actually harmful to most students—a message which had been so radical and out of the mainstream twenty years ago, actually sounded very much like the messages of my other guests. Sir Ken Robinson, Seth Godin, Anya Kamenetz, Tim Magner—guests both well-known and more obscure—were now singing similar tunes, but the audience of traditional educators now seems much more open to it. In fact, in most of my interviews, I might venture to say that we start from the baseline of the factory-model “story” of education being “broken,” and then work toward understanding where we might go in the future. If there's a more general acceptance that the story, or narrative, we've told ourselves about the purpose and value of education for the past 100+ years is now broken, there's also an awareness that we don't have a ready replacement for that story. Stories help us to place our lives and activities in context, and without a new story, we have a crisis of “meaning:” it's not clear how to measure what is important or not, and how to move forward with some relative assurance that we are accomplishing things of worth and value. As the Internet revolution opens the door to dramatic changes in the power and organizational structures within (and between) societies and cultures, many of the other important stories we've relied on are breaking or broken as well, especially and including economics and politics. Finding a new story (or stories) for education becomes imperative because so many other aspects of our lives are dependent on our vision of how teaching and learning take place. It's telling that while the Internet has become an unparalleled platform for learning, intitiative, participation, productivity, and creativity, almost all of this happens outside of formal educational institutions. Where we were largely passive media consumers before, we now have a web that encourages and even favors participation. We have online leaning, anytime and anywhere connected devices, a crowd-source encyclopedia that has displaced a 200-year old cultural bulwark, free courses from MIT, and a content licensing system (Creative Commons) for purposefully sharing content. We have Open Source Software, open textbooks, and 2.0 versions of activism, politics and government, and volunteer work. We have an incredible new electronic long-tail of creative and business opportunity, personal expertise being built on blogs and wikis, student portfolios more powerful than any resume, and worldwide network facilitating innovation and collaboration at speeds almost hard to believe. We have a social network whose membership, if it were a country, would make it the third largest in the world. We're unleashing the cognitive and social energies of mankind in what may turn out to be one of the most fundamental shifts in what it means to be human that's ever occurred. And yet, our schools remain al[...]



This Week's Live and Interactive Webinars in Elluminate

2010-07-11T04:14:06.000Z

Below are this week's public, free, and interactive Webinars through LearnCentral.org, the social learning network for education that I work on for Elluminate. The time of the events below will show up automatically in your own time zone when you are registered in LearnCentral and when you have chosen your time zone in your profile. Event recordings are posted and available after the events if you aren't able to attend them live. If you are looking for an… Below are this week's public, free, and interactive Webinars through LearnCentral.org, the social learning network for education that I work on for Elluminate. The time of the events below will show up automatically in your own time zone when you are registered in LearnCentral and when you have chosen your time zone in your profile. Event recordings are posted and available after the events if you aren't able to attend them live. If you are looking for an easy calendar import / RSS feed for these events, you'll find our Google Calendar "hack" at LearnCentral.tv (the developers at LearnCentral are working on a good long-term solution). Be on the lookout for Australia-time-friendly events as part of the new Australia Series, Spanish-language Webinars from the Aula 2.0 Series, and student-oriented sessions fromStudents 2.0! We also hope you will consider hosting your own public webinars using the LearnCentral public room--instructions are available by joining the "Host Your Own Webinar" group on the main announcement tab (http://www.learncentral.org/group/3432/host-your-own-webinars). Thanks for your attention, and see you online! Monday, July 12th 10am PDT (US) / 1pm EDT (US) / 5pm GMT/UTC (intl times): ELLUMINATE LIVE SERIES “Project Team Triage,” with presenter, Lou Russell. In this presentation, Andrew will explain how he has successively removed teaching & learning activities from the classroom and replaced them with online equivalents that are equally (or more) effective. His journey started in 2006 with a biology podcast (which is now receiving 1000 downloads a day) through which he explains the concepts that were previously only explained in class. Now he teaches biology to a class who does not even have a place in the school timetable! He will share the tools he has used and/or is using, including podcasting, screencasting, instant messaging, various websites/social networks and Elluminate. Some of his students will (hopefully) also attend to give a student perspective. LearnCentral Link: http://www.learncentral.org/node/85562 (pre-registration required) 10:45am PDT (US) / 1:45pm EDT (US) / 5:45pm GMT/UTC (intl times): AUSTRALIA SERIES “Tech Talk Tuesdays: Teaching and Learning without a Classroom,” with host Anne Mirtschin. In this presentation, Andrew Douch will explain how he has successively removed teaching & learning activities from the classroom and replaced them with online equivalents that are equally (or more) effective. His journey started in 2006 with a biology podcast (which is now receiving 1000 downloads a day) through which he explains the concepts that were previously only explained in class. Now he teaches biology to a class who does not even have a place in the school timetable! He will share the tools he has used and/or is using, including podcasting, screencasting, instant messaging, various websites/social networks and Elluminate. Some of his students will (hopefully) also attend to give a student perspective.LearnCentral Link: http://www.learncentral.org/event/83447 Tuesday, July 13th 6pm PDT (US) / 9pm EDT (US) / 1am GMT/UTC (next day) (intl times): “Collaborative Online Education Project Training for Teachers,” with presenter Mayte Esponda. "What is a Collaborative Project? Why collaborative Projects Online? Key factors of Collaborative Projects Teacher training Is it necessary to be trained to build a successful collaborative project? LearnCentral Link: http://www.learncentral.org/event/80509 The 2010 Global Education Conference A[...]



Live and Interactive Events This Week

2010-07-06T01:30:00.000Z

Below are this week's public, free, and interactive Webinars through LearnCentral.org, the social learning network for education that I work on for Elluminate. This post has the live links for each session (which are left out of the emails in order to avoid spam filters), The time of the events below will show up automatically in your own time zone when you are registered in LearnCentral and when you have chosen your time zone in your… Below are this week's public, free, and interactive Webinars through LearnCentral.org, the social learning network for education that I work on for Elluminate. This post has the live links for each session (which are left out of the emails in order to avoid spam filters), The time of the events below will show up automatically in your own time zone when you are registered in LearnCentral and when you have chosen your time zone in your profile. Event recordings are posted and available after the events if you aren't able to attend them live. If you are looking for an easy calendar import / RSS feed for these events, you'll find my Google Calendar "hack" at LearnCentral.tv (the developers at LearnCentral are working on a good long-term solution). Be on the lookout for Australia-time-friendly events as part of the new Australia Series, Spanish-language Webinars from the Aula 2.0 Series, and student-oriented sessions from Students 2.0! I also hope you will consider hosting your own public webinars using the LearnCentral public room--instructions are available by joining the "Host Your Own Webinar" group on the main announcement tab (http://www.learncentral.org/group/3432/host-your-own-webinars). Thanks for your attention, and see you online! Steve Tuesday, July 6th 11am PDT (US) / 1pm EDT (US) / 5pm GMT/UTC (intl times): “ Collaborative Online Education Project Training for Teachers,” with Mayte Esponda. “What is a Collaborative Project? Why collaborative Projects Online? Key factors of Collaborative Projects Teacher training Is it necessary to be trained to build a successful collaborative project?”LearnCentral Link: http://www.learncentral.org/event/80508 5pm PDT (US) / 8pm EDT (US) / 12am GMT/UTC (next day) (intl times): FUTURE OF EDUCATION SERIESHeidi Hayes Jacobs discusses her book, Curriculum 21: Essential Education for a Changing World, with Steve Hargadon as part of the FutureofEducation.com interview series. LearnCentral Link: http://www.learncentral.org/node/84531 6pm PDT (US) / 9pm EDT (US) / 1am GMT/UTC (next day) (intl times): AULA 2.0 SERIES“Grupalidad Online.” “Que es grupabilidad online? Va ser un taller bastante interactivo.” LearnCentral Link: http://www.learncentral.org/event/84135 Wednesday, July 7th 4:00am PDT (US) / 7:00am EDT (US) / 9:00am GMT/UTC (intl times): AUSTRALIA SERIES“Game of Games: Clarify Your Goals.” Join host Coach Carole and Angelo John Lewis for a discussion about games. “This is an intro to the Clarify Your Goal game, a virtual game that helps you clarify your goal and commit to your next step. You'll, identify, clarify, and get feedback on your goal, plus help others do the same. This is a mini-version of Clarify, which takes place online over three-to-four days. You'll play, learn about Clarify, the JumpStart game and the Game of Games.” LearnCentral Link: http://www.learncentral.org/event/82610/ 6:30pm PDT (US) / 9:30pm EDT (US) / 1:30am GMT/UTC (intl times): MATH 2.0 WEEKLY SERIES“Calculation Nation.” Calculation Nation uses the power of the Web to let students challenge opponents from anywhere in the world. At the same time, students are able to challenge themselves by investigating significant mathematical content and practicing fundamental skills. The element of competition adds an extra layer of excitement. Calculation Nation is part of the NCTM Illuminations project, which offers Standards-based resources that improve the teaching and learning of mathematics for all students. Join Maria Droujkova an[...]



New Ning Plans: The Good, The Bad, and the Unknown

2010-05-04T21:16:08.000Z

As they had promised, today Ning announced a new strategy for their host-your-own social networking service. The following notes are from my reading of the blog announcement, the similar announcement page, and the new FAQ. They are not definitive and are subject… As they had promised, today Ning announced a new strategy for their host-your-own social networking service. The following notes are from my reading of the blog announcement, the similar announcement page, and the new FAQ. They are not definitive and are subject to possible misreadings; however, I did have a full discussion today with John McDonald from Ning during which he clarified several questions I had about the new plans, and I believe my notes here to be accurate. Please feel free to comment with clarifications or corrections. Because I've been at the USDLA conference today and have limited time, I'm not going to give a complete overview of the new plans. Please refer to the links above for that detail. I'm going to focus on what the impact of these new plans will be, particularly, for educators and the educational community. The Good: $2.95 per month for Ning Mini networks is a really good price point. While it does not allow for Clay Shirky's "failure is free" kind of experimentation, it should make it relatively easy on the pocket to try a network out. And because there's an easy upgrade path if a network is successful or needs more features, it seems like a really good price point if you have to charge some amount. Annual payment plans will help. While still only credit card and PayPal, but with the promise of future alternatives, just having the ability to pay for a year at a time should allow educators to more easily budget for the expense of a network and submit for reimbursement. A simple export feature will provide some peace of mind, both for backing up a network and/or for transferring data to other services. It will be interesting to see if there are other services which will be able to do the full data import from a Ning network, but if they can it does provide options and a sense of security. Single sign-on / alternative authentication has been a highly desired feature from Ning in the past, and will potentially allow institutions and organizations with existing membership bases to incorporate access to Ning into their existing services. It seems like there will be a couple of other somewhat intriguing options here as well, including logging in using Facebook or Twitter authentication. What's not entirely clear in the material--or, according to John, to Ning yet--is if these features will be included as part of the Pro service or an extra fee. API access to networks will be a plus to organizations really wanting to research the value and use of educational social networking. Several graduate students have looked closely at my Classroom 2.0 network and this kind of access will make deeper scholarship possible. $19.95 for full branding control. The marketing message that you will now have more control at a cheaper price with the Plus network fee is, in my case, pretty true. We'll talk below about videos and bandwidth, but for me I'll be paying less and getting more for most of my networks. The Bad: No fully-free networks will reduce experimentation, at least on the Ning platform. The ability to start a network (or many) for free has been, I believe, a big factor in the adoption of Ning and the lack of a completely free option does change things. What's not stated blatantly here, but which I believe John said at one point and which seems to be true, is that Ning themselves will no longer be doing any ad-serving; this, of course, means that even the base-level network has to have a fee. If you don't pay even the minimal amount, currently your network and all its content will disappear 30 days after the July shift. While Ning will likely provide some capability to get a network back within some limited period of[...]



Web 2.0 Is the Future of Education

2008-03-05T15:00:00.000Z

A moment of extreme clarity became an obsession for me last week. A session that I had prepared for the IL-TCE conference went from "Web 2.0 Tools for the Classroom" to "Why Web 2.0 Is Important to the Future of Education." Then, as PowerPoint fever gripped me (OpenOffice.org Impress, actually), moving slides around as though they were puzzle pieces finally coming together correctly, I found my thoughts coalescing toward a bold conclusion and… A moment of extreme clarity became an obsession for me last week. A session that I had prepared for the IL-TCE conference went from "Web 2.0 Tools for the Classroom" to "Why Web 2.0 Is Important to the Future of Education." Then, as PowerPoint fever gripped me (OpenOffice.org Impress, actually), moving slides around as though they were puzzle pieces finally coming together correctly, I found my thoughts coalescing toward a bold conclusion and a final title change: "Web 2.0 Is the Future of Education." It was not, I know, what I was supposed to talk about. But it felt so important, as though the idea needed me to say it out loud. And it was magnified by the impression I was having that we're about to have the biggest discussion about education and learning in decades, maybe longer. I believe that the read/write Web, or what we are calling Web 2.0, will culturally, socially, intellectually, and politically have a greater impact than the advent of the printing press. I believe that we cannot even begin to imagine the changes that are going to take place as the two-way nature of the Internet begins to flower, and that even those of us who have spent time imagining this future will be astounded by what happens. I'm going to identify ten trends in this regard that I think have particular importance for education and learning, and then discuss seven steps I think educators can take to make a difference during this time. I have been heavily influenced by an article by John Seely Brown (JSB) in Educause Magazine, called "Minds on Fire: Open Education, the Long Tail, and Learning 2.0" and listening at least twice to a talk he'd given at MIT on the same topic. I've tried to attribute his thoughts here, but there is a fair amount of "remix" taking place in my bold assertion, and while the conclusion is my own, his work has significantly informed it. Trend #1: A New Publishing Revolution. The Internet is becoming a platform for unparalleled creativity, and we are creating the new content of the Web. The Web that we've known for some years now has really been a one-way medium, where we read and received as passive participants, and that required a large financial investment to create content. The new Web, or Web 2.0, is a two-way medium, based on contribution, creation, and collaboration--often requiring only access to the Web and a browser. Blogs, wikis, podcasting, video/photo-sharing, social networking, and any of the hundreds (thousands?) of software services preceded by the words "social" or "collaborative" are changing how and why content is created. Trend #2: A Tidal Wave of Information. The publishing revolution will have an impact on the sheer volume of content available to us that is hard to even comprehend. If fewer than 1% of the users of Wikipedia actually contribute to it, what will happen when 10% do? Or 20%? There are over 100,000 blogs created daily, and MySpace alone has something over 375,000 new users (content creators) every day. I remember how much work I had to go to in my childhood to just find information. Now, we must figure out what information to give our time and attention to when we are engulfed by it. Web 2.0 is the cause of what can only be called a flood of content--and while we don't know what the solutions will be to the information dilemma, we can be pretty sure they will be brought forth from the collaborative web itself. I will also say that on a personal level, when people ask me the answer to cont[...]



Report on the Classroom 2.0 LIVE Workshop in San Francisco

2008-02-08T01:53:08.000Z

This past Friday and Saturday we held the first ever "Classroom 2.0 LIVE" workshop in San Francisco, California. I've been trying to make as many notes as I can about this event because I think the format of a collaboratively-built workshop around the topic of Web 2.0 in education has such potential, and I am anxious to do more of these and to keep improving them. I apologize in advance for the length of the post--for those of you who are interested, the detail may be worth it, but what it… This past Friday and Saturday we held the first ever "Classroom 2.0 LIVE" workshop in San Francisco, California. I've been trying to make as many notes as I can about this event because I think the format of a collaboratively-built workshop around the topic of Web 2.0 in education has such potential, and I am anxious to do more of these and to keep improving them. I apologize in advance for the length of the post--for those of you who are interested, the detail may be worth it, but what it really does is to give me the chance to record and process the event in a way that will help to improve what we did. I've got eleven potential dates and/or venues for holding a similar workshop in different locations around the US in 2008, which you can see (or add to) at http://www.classroom20wiki.com/Local+Workshops.Whether you were at the workshop or not, I hope you will contribute to this discussion!What Went Well: I think the workshop did a good job of mirroring the collaborative nature of Web 2.0. We used a wiki to organize the topics and discussions, and involved the participants as much as we could in giving the sessions. I think that's significant as well since so many who might come to this kind of workshop will have limited experience and might feel intimidated to participate--so hopefully we were inviting without requiring participation. As you can see from this photo by Derrall Garrison, the more natural seating arrangement for collaborative sessions ended up being a circle. I really like the idea of "unconferences," where your conference sessions actually get created at the start of the conference, but I think that would be hard to sell to both prospective participants and vendor sponsors alike. And since I ran group tours for some years after college, I also believe it's important to have some structure so that you can relax within that structure. So I've been calling what we did a "collaborative conference," which I think is a good name for an event where participants play an active role in developing the conference in advance, and then are active participants during the event. A really great example of how this worked was the XO (One Laptop Per Child) demonstration by the amazing Jane Krauss and a member of the local XO user group in SF (who heard about what we were doing and offered to come and help!). Keeping the workshop inexpensive. By having vendor sponsors, and keeping everything on the cheap, we were able to hold a workshop that didn't cost participants to attend. (Of course, while the actual workshop was no-charge, taking the time off and getting to SF had a "cost" to everyone, but we wanted our part to be free.) It really, really helped to have Wikispaces make the arrangements for the venue, since their discovery of the Hotel Whitcomb really made this possible. Imagine--a beautiful hotel with an amazing history (was used as San Francisco's City Hall for a period of time), located centrally on Market Street, with free high-speed wireless Internet, and that didn't care if we brought in our own food. I'm really at a loss to explain this hotel--I mean, it wasn't a 5-star facility by any means, but the rooms were clean and neat, and for downtown San Francisco, were an absolute bargain at $89/night. It was interesting to me that almost all of the other guests in the hotel that I met appeared to be college-aged (from other countries?). The only thing[...]






Anastasia Goodstein on Totally Wired Teens

2007-08-02T02:27:21.000Z

Anastasia Goodstein, the author of… Anastasia Goodstein, the author of Totally Wired: What Teens and Tweens Are Really Doing Online, was my guest on EdTechLive today.Anastasia blogs for for teen/youth media and marketing professionals at Ypulse.com, about Teen and Tween online life at Totally Wired. We met virtually when she, Jim Daly (the editor-in-chief of Edutopia), and the Yahoo! for Teachers team selected Ben Wilkoff as the Totally Wired Teacher of the Year.I stayed up until the wee hours of this morning reading her book, which I had intended only to skim but which kept me totally engaged, and which I recommend as a very insightful look at the online life of youth today. There's even a chapter on technology in schools called "Teaching the Teachers," which I thought did a really good job of portraying the current state of computing in education.Listen to the the Interview in MP3 format Listen to the Interview in Vorbis OGG format Subscribe to this AudioCast: [...]



The P.E. Geek: Boys, Sports, and ... Wikis?

2007-07-31T17:58:28.000Z

Kristian Still teaches 16 - 19 year old young men in a sports course at Tauton's College in the UK, which is designed to encourage male learners to go on to higher or extended education. The course uses their interest in sports to help them stay engaged and pursue additional academic… Kristian Still teaches 16 - 19 year old young men in a sports course at Tauton's College in the UK, which is designed to encourage male learners to go on to higher or extended education. The course uses their interest in sports to help them stay engaged and pursue additional academic achievements.Kristian uses the tools of Web 2.0 as an essential way to do this. He is the "P.E. Geek"--a fellow who is able to keep his students as interested in being in the classroom as out on the sporting field.Kristian's work is a fascinating example of harnessing the creative potential of the read/write web to provide an environment of engaged learning. Mainly using the wiki platform as a base, Kristian includes rss feeds, photo and video sharing, online slide presentations, mind-maps, shared spreadsheets, quizzes, games, podcasting, and other Web 2.0 tools to teach respect, attitude, and preparation.In the audio interview with Kristian that is linked below, he takes us through his websites and shows examples of all of these technologies, and you can actually follow along on the web through the technology of Trailfire. Trailfire lets you build or follow a visible trail of websites and comments. Kristian's "trail," which includes 17 web pages and is marked with comments by him about each "stop," is accessed here: Kristianstill's Web 2.0 experience (http://trailfire.com/Kristianstill/trailview/38344). ( You can also download an add-on to Firefox which allows you to easily create "trails" and follow others' trails.)Kristian's not like any P.E. teacher I ever had. I think you're really going to like to get to know this inspiring educator!Listen to the the Interview in MP3 format Listen to the Interview in Vorbis OGG format Post Script Notes: Since the interview, Wikispaces now allows "automatic merging"--that is, when people try to edit the same page at the same time, Wikispaces merges the changes so that people don't have to worry about overwriting each other's work. And VoiceThread now allows embedding their "voicethreads" into other websites.(Cross-posted from The Infinite Thinking Machine)[...]



Feed for All Forum Discussions and Replies

2007-07-08T15:11:27.000Z

If you want to track every forum discussion and all the comments that are posted on Classroom 2.0, you can use this URL:



http://classroom20.ning.com/forum/topic/list?feed=yes&sort=mostRecent&xn_auth=no



link



If you need help understanding how to use a feed reader, you can watch… If you want to track every forum discussion and all the comments that are posted on Classroom 2.0, you can use this URL:

http://classroom20.ning.com/forum/topic/list?feed=yes&sort=mostRecent&xn_auth=no

link

If you need help understanding how to use a feed reader, you can watch this video.

(I'm still trying to figure out how to do the same thing for all the comments on blog posts.)



Helping to Understand Social Networking: Danah Boyd

2007-07-03T21:02:07.000Z

As more and more we are seeing social networking for the huge phenomenon that it is, and as educators are beginning to see the value of social networking in education (for both student and teachers--especially professional development), it is worth getting to know Danah Boyd. Danah is a PhD candidate at the School of… As more and more we are seeing social networking for the huge phenomenon that it is, and as educators are beginning to see the value of social networking in education (for both student and teachers--especially professional development), it is worth getting to know Danah Boyd. Danah is a PhD candidate at the School of Information (iSchool) at the University of California - Berkeley and a Fellow at the University of Southern California Annenberg Center for Communications. From her website:"My research focuses on how people negotiate a presentation of self to unknown audiences in mediated contexts. In particular, my dissertation is looking at how youth engage with networked publics like MySpace, Facebook, LiveJournal, Xanga and YouTube. I am interested in how the architectural differences between unmediated and mediated publics affect sociality, identity and culture. My dissertation research is being funded as a part of the MacArthur Foundation's Initiative on New Media and Learning" Danah helps to pull the covers back a little on the what is going on between people at social networking sites. She's fascinating to listen to, and while she studies youth and their involvement with these tools, many of the same dynamics take place in adult use of social networking (after lots of discussion about the "friend" features of social networking that we've had in Classroom 2.0, I have been particularly interested in Danah's discussions about "friends").Danah blogs at: http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/Danah's website: http://www.danah.org/ (has background info, papers, etc.)Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danah_BoydSome media:http://kt.flexiblelearning.net.au/tkt2007/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/boyd.mp3 http://media-cyber.law.harvard.edu/AudioBerkman/danah_boyd_2007-06-19.mp3http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Nfyw2KYHWw (Bill O'Reilly interview--Dana being very patient, I think)http://www.ibiblio.org/speakers/index.cgi/2006/9/14#boyd06I'd love to get Danah on for an interview, but she's been far too busy. No surprise! She's expressed concerns that educators need to understand what's taking place on social networks, and I agree. I think the positive opportunities to use customizable social neworks (like Ning) are two-fold: both to build learning management systems for classes and teacher professional development communities. Be sure to check out Classroom 2.0 (built on Ning) if you haven't already.[...]



Ben Wilkoff 's Academy of Discovery (School 2.0, Part 11)

2007-07-03T19:38:39.000Z

For months, I've been listening to this guy who records himself talking in the car (and no, it's not Kevin Honeycutt!). He calls his recording series and blog "Discourses about Discourse," and most of them are discussions with himself about his attempts to implement "School 2.0:" his use of the tools of the web in his classroom, how his students are responding, what feedback he is getting from the… For months, I've been listening to this guy who records himself talking in the car (and no, it's not Kevin Honeycutt!). He calls his recording series and blog "Discourses about Discourse," and most of them are discussions with himself about his attempts to implement "School 2.0:" his use of the tools of the web in his classroom, how his students are responding, what feedback he is getting from the parents, and his concerns about how his students will do next year when they don't have the same ability to use the web. These soliloquies are surprisingly engaging, and they belong to Ben Wilkoff, a 7th and 8th grade language arts teacher at Cresthill Middle School in Highlands Ranch, Colorado.Ben is only 24, but it's a wise voice that comes to me through my mp3 player (by the way, Ben--and others--remember that many of us have to convert your mp4 files every time we download them!) I invited Ben to describe his "Academy of Discovery" in this recorded interview, and I was impressed enough that I nominated Ben for the Edutopia/Yahoo! for Teachers Totally Wired Teacher Award--largely based on his stories of how he has had to work with the parents of his students to help them understand what he is teaching. Now, I may not have been the only one to nominate Ben, but I will take some credit for the fact the HE WON and will be flying to San Francisco later this month to accept this award. Turns out Ben was also and early Ning user...In the crush to get ready for three conferences in June, poor Ben's interview has been delayed about a month getting posted. It's not the only one--I've got some other zingers still in the hopper!Listen to the the Interview in MP3 format Listen to the Interview in Vorbis OGG format Subscribe to this AudioCast: [...]



Feedback to US Secretary of Education on Technology in Education

2007-06-08T22:07:04.000Z

(image) For those in the U.S., Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings has asked for ideas on the integration of technology in education. There is a form on the ed.gov site, but no ability to dialog or even leave your contact information if you fill it out. Therefore, I have created a forum thread for each of Secretary Spellings' questions, and propose that we discuss them here and invite her office to view the dialog on this website and even participate.



This is a terrific… (image) For those in the U.S., Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings has asked for ideas on the integration of technology in education. There is a form on the ed.gov site, but no ability to dialog or even leave your contact information if you fill it out. Therefore, I have created a forum thread for each of Secretary Spellings' questions, and propose that we discuss them here and invite her office to view the dialog on this website and even participate.

This is a terrific opportunity to not only respond but to also show the benefit of Web 2.0 technology in addressing this kind of issue.

Here are the questions, each linked to their own forum thread:

1. In what ways has technology improved the effectiveness of your classroom, school or district?

2. Based on your role (administrator, parent, teacher, student, entrepreneur, business leader), how have you used educational data to make better decisions or be more successful?

3. In what ways can technology help us prepare our children for global competition and reach our goals of eliminating achievement gaps and having all students read and do math on grade level by 2014?

4. What should be the federal government's role in supporting the use of technology in our educational system?



How to Upload TeacherTube Video to Classroom 2.0

2007-05-30T02:30:00.000Z

Adapted from Phil McCluskey at Ning:



Go to the video that you want to use on TeacherTube. Then look at the "page source" information for the page (in Firefox, View --> Page Source).



When you view the source of the page you get a lot a lot of gobbledy-gook. Look for some code like this:





(embed) Adapted from Phil McCluskey at Ning:

Go to the video that you want to use on TeacherTube. Then look at the "page source" information for the page (in Firefox, View --> Page Source).

When you view the source of the page you get a lot a lot of gobbledy-gook. Look for some code like this:


(embed) http://www.teachertube.com/flvplayer.swf"
FlashVars="config=http://www.teachertube.com/flvplayer.php?
viewkey=c7b54800246348c7fa4a&vimg=http://www.teachertube.com/thumb/
1_2039.jpg" quality="high" bgcolor="#000000" wmode="transparent"
width="100%" height="100%" name="flvplayer"
allowScriptAccess="sameDomain" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"
pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer">


When you go to add video, choose "from YouTube or Google." Then use the code (like above) and past it into the "embed" box. It won't show a still frame from the video (shows a camera icon), but it will work when clicked on.

Comment below if any trouble!




Tim O'Reilly on Web 2.0 and Education

2007-05-01T16:58:45.000Z

(Cross posted from www.SteveHargadon.com)"I think we're in--in a lot of ways--a period of the most profound reinvention of ...education and how people need to learn since the invention of literacy." Tim O'Reilly is the founder of… (Cross posted from www.SteveHargadon.com)"I think we're in--in a lot of ways--a period of the most profound reinvention of ...education and how people need to learn since the invention of literacy." Tim O'Reilly is the founder of O'Reilly Media, and one of the originators of the phrase "Web 2.0." His essay on Web 2.0 certainly is considered the seminal description.Tim and I talked about Web 2.0, education, and what the future holds for networked computing. I haven't put this in my "School 2.0" series because, as you'll hear, Tim's take on education isn't nearly as technology-focused as one might expect.Topics that Tim covers in the interview: Being self-taught Having a mental model of how the world works to let you figure out what's important A new "digital divide" today between those who know how to think about search and those who don't; those who know where the current hot information is being shared, and those who don't. Tim's skepticism of formal education, coming from the computer industry and seeing creativity from those with very different backgrounds, with their formal education almost alway not in the area where they have made an impact (himself included). Self-learning. How most periods of a creative renaissance start with inspired amateurs. The importance of "doing things," "tinkering,", and "exploratory learning." That "engagement" is not new to Web 2.0, but the opportunity is being democratized by the technology. That it is important not to generalize too much about where the technology is headed from the initial formative period. How he believes that spending on educational technology is a bad idea (smile!), and that smaller class sizes would make the most difference in education, period, by giving more interaction with passionate adults who have time and ability to focus on kids. (See if you feel comfortable with how I respond to this point.) How we need to get rid of unionized seniority to get fresh blood, so the best can rise to the top instead of the most senior. (Again, I'm interested in your responses to this and your take on how I responded.) Open Source software, and how Web 2.0 is actually antithetical to open source software. Clayton Christiansen's "law of conservation of attractive profits," where value in Web applications moving toward the harnessing and collecting of data and intelligence. How it's not free software that we need but free data. The inevitability of large companies absorbing the web 2.0 technologies by leveraging their data collection capabilities. The biggest change he sees on horizon: collective intelligence based on our being "sensory enabled." "Live Software" that learns from that data. What Web 2.0 technologies that he likes His final words for educators: "have fun." Share your own enthusiasm, excitement, and passion. Listen to the the Interview in MP3 format Listen to the Interview in Vorbis OGG format Subscribe to this AudioCast: [...]



The Web 2.0 and School 2.0 Connection

2007-04-25T07:02:54.000Z

(image) I gave the keynote address to the CVCUE meeting
in Fresno this past Saturday, and prepared a presentation on why Web
2.0 is going to be so important to education. When I was driving home I
made a connection that I hadn't fully made before: that the transition
between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 is very similar, if not almost identical
to, the change… (image) I gave the keynote address to the CVCUE meeting
in Fresno this past Saturday, and prepared a presentation on why Web
2.0 is going to be so important to education. When I was driving home I
made a connection that I hadn't fully made before: that the transition
between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 is very similar, if not almost identical
to, the change between School 1.0 and School 2.0.

Now, in retrospect, it seems obvious that the technology that is most
significantly reshaping our culture and business (Web 2.0) would also
have the potential to dramatically change how we view education, but I
hadn't really defined the parallels in my own mind. These two simple
graphics describe what I'm seeing.

Web 1.0 came out of our existing mindsets of how information is transferred, and very much
reflected the 100+ year history of industrialism, with
experts/businesses dispensing identical knowledge/products to mass
consumers.
(image)
Web 2.0 has really been the flowering of new relationships between
individuals and businesses, and reflects new ways of thinking that the
technology has facilitated or created. It's about engaged conversations
that take place directly, and don't rely on top-down management, but
peer feedback and mentoring. It's an incredibly effective restructuring
of how learning takes place, and somehow we have to figure out how to
bring this experience into our learning institutions--or they will
become obsolete.

----

Cross-posted from www.SteveHargadon.com. OK, Classroom 2.0 folks, is this on the mark? What do you think?



Web 2.0: A Personal Learning Renaissance

2007-04-17T17:15:24.000Z

(Cross-posted on www.SteveHargadon.com)



Yesterday, on the Classroom 2.0 social network, Elizabeth Davis posted:



"Following and reading blogs, participating in ning, contributing to wikis,
writing in my blog, I haven't thought this…
(Cross-posted on www.SteveHargadon.com)

Yesterday, on the Classroom 2.0 social network, Elizabeth Davis posted:

"Following and reading blogs, participating in ning, contributing to wikis,
writing in my blog, I haven't thought this much in years. It truly is
an amazing phenomenon. I feel so intellectually alive. I'm inspired and
challenged constantly. The blogs I read lead me to question and explore
new tools and Websites. I haven't written this much since I was in
school. It is all so exciting and energizing. For me, classroom 2.0
could just be about my own growth and learning and that would be
enough."

"Teacher K" then commented:

"
I agree! I am reading and thinking and writing far more now than I have
in years. All of this content is helping me to do new things in my
classroom, and helping me to see new possibilities for my colleagues as
well."


I would echo by saying that Web 2.0 has meant a personal learning renaissance for me as well. Starting to blog kindled in me something that led me to
be an active learner again, something that had been missing from my
life for some number of years in the midst of other good things:
raising kids, serving in my church, and working. Now I am feeling
engaged in learning again. Will Richardson
captured this, I think, when he said: "I've learned more in my
four-plus years as a blogger than I have in all my years of formal
education."

I think it is our new personal learning experiences with Web 2.0 that are driving many of us to look for ways to bring this
feeling of engagement into the school and the classroom. It's not the tools, necessarily, but the level of engagement we want to share. This
is also why I sense a growing consensus among the educational bloggers
that the best way to bring change to the classroom is to help the
teachers feel it themselves. As Elizabeth says in the same post:

"I hope I can help my colleagues to see the potential I see and feel the
buzz that I feel. This is the first step to bringing it to the kids. I
think teachers have to feel it for themselves first. I hope I can bring
that to them. I think, with the help of this community, I probably can!"



Educational Blogger Conference on June 23rd in Atlanta

2007-04-13T18:14:49.000Z

(image) Edubloggercon2007
– This first-ever, international, all-day “meetup” of educational
bloggers will take place on Saturday, June 23rd, at the Georgia World
Conference Center in Atlanta just before the start of NECC.

All are invited–whether you yourself blog, are just an educational blog reader, or even just want to hang out with an interesting group of people. The
event is free, and you can indicate that you are coming (and see…

(image) Edubloggercon2007
– This first-ever, international, all-day “meetup” of educational
bloggers will take place on Saturday, June 23rd, at the Georgia World
Conference Center in Atlanta just before the start of NECC.

All are invited–whether you yourself blog, are just an educational blog reader,
or even just want to hang out with an interesting group of people. The
event is free, and you can indicate that you are coming (and see who
else will be there) at the Edubloggercon wiki.
This event will be unique in that it is going to be organized by the
participants in real time at the wiki. We have access all that day to
the large Open Source Pavilion room at the Conference Center and there
will be free wi-fi: beyond that is up to you. So come join the
discussion and help us plan a fun and stimulating experience.




Interview with Gina Bianchini from Ning

2007-04-13T16:29:00.000Z

(image) (Cross-post from www.SteveHargadon.com)



Gina Bianchini is the co-founder and CEO of Ning, the "do-it-yourself" social networking site. Gina is no ivory-tower
entrepreneur--she is an active participant herself in several Ning
networks, and she demonstrates her passion (and her hands-on style) in
this fun interview. We talk about the… (image) (Cross-post from www.SteveHargadon.com)

Gina Bianchini is the co-founder and CEO of Ning, the "do-it-yourself" social networking site. Gina is no ivory-tower
entrepreneur--she is an active participant herself in several Ning
networks, and she demonstrates her passion (and her hands-on style) in
this fun interview. We talk about the original vision for Ning, some of
the ways that Ning is being used by different groups, and what features
are coming down the road. It's the future features Gina describes that
will get current Ning users excited.

The power and scope of Ning is truly amazing. Let's just say that I got off the call and
immediately created a group for my kids drama troupe, and thought of
several others.

(image) Listen to the the Interview in MP3 format
(image) Listen to the Interview in Vorbis OGG format

Subscribe to this AudioCast:(image) (image) (image)






Amazing, Amazing Use of an Old Computer

2007-04-13T06:34:00.000Z

(Cross-post from www.SteveHargadon.com) I'm having an incredible brainstorm about used computers and homeless shelters, emergency shelters, low-income housing units, schools, etc.This is our kitchen computer. Actually, it's just the monitor and our small stereo. The computer is below, and pictured below. The computer is… (Cross-post from www.SteveHargadon.com) I'm having an incredible brainstorm about used computers and homeless shelters, emergency shelters, low-income housing units, schools, etc.This is our kitchen computer. Actually, it's just the monitor and our small stereo. The computer is below, and pictured below. The computer is an old Dell GX240, rather beaten up, with a 4GB (that's right, only 4GB, not the original) drive, 256MB of memory, CD drive, but no floppy or usable Windows license. Probably worth well under $100; I'm imagining this would work easily on pretty much on most P3s.I'm running Puppy Linux on it, a Linux operating system which runs from the CD-Rom drive, and weighs in at around 50MB. You read that right. I downloaded a version of Firefox 2.0-something, Flash 9 for Linux, and then Skype and Gizmo. Now the operating system and programs are still less than 150MB. Puppy then saves the configuration and data files on the small hard drive. If I were more of an expert in Puppy, I could do away with the CD-Rom and have it boot from the hard drive.This is our main family computer. Here's what it can now do:1. Anything Firefox. Great YouTube/Google/etc. video playback, perfectly synchronized (not sure I feel confident about Puppy's use of the codecs, but still have to research that). Puppy has good word processing, spreadsheet, and other programs, but truth be told, I now live almost entirely on the web. To have Firefox 2.0+ on an old computer, where the operating system takes almost no overhead, is like working on a P4.2. Skype and Gizmo phone calls. I plugged in a headset/mic combo tonight and made phone calls. OMIGOSH. OK, can we talk about emergency relief efforts? Deploying old computers in disaster shelters where people will instantly have access to both the web and calling?3. I've tested Puppy on my recently-purchased Toshiba laptop, and the wireless drivers work great, so it can do wireless. Municipal free wi-fi efforts, here you go. Get computers and Internet access into the hands of those who need them the most.4. We've even uploaded our family CD-music collection to MP3Tunes, and we now listen to them, or to Pandora, directly out of our stereo thanks to a cable from the computer to the stereo auxiliary jacks. OK, that's a luxury, but it's pretty amazing to have all of our music (thousands of songs) stored on the web for free and to have an old computer acting as the control-panel from a web page.Here's the deal. Over 100,000 computers are discarded in this country every day. Estimates are that less than 5% get re-used. The major manufacturers have recycling programs, but you have to know that recycling is not re-use, and recycling a computer gets very, very little back in terms of raw materials. Re-use is SIGNIFICANTLY better for the environment. Recycling is just politics. Here are the stats from Jim Lynch today announcing an EPA calculator for computer reuse:====Reusing just one computer with a CRT monitor saves:30 lbs of hazardous waste77 lbs of solid waste77 lbs of materials147 lbs (17.5 gallons) of water from being polluted32 tons of air from being polluted1,333 lbs of CO2 from [...]



Where Is the Technology Revolution in Education? (School 2.0, Part 10)

2007-04-10T22:45:12.000Z

http://www.edtechlive.com/audio/Russell.mp3http://www.edtechlive.com/audio/Russell.oggSchool 2.0 Interview series: http://www.edtechlive.com/recordings+list Yesterday I recorded this audio interview with Michael Russell… http://www.edtechlive.com/audio/Russell.mp3http://www.edtechlive.com/audio/Russell.oggSchool 2.0 Interview series: http://www.edtechlive.com/recordings+listYesterday I recorded this audio interview with Michael Russell of Boston College, whom I had recently heard speak at the COSN's 12th Annual K-12 School Networking Conference on the topic of "Where Is the Technology Revolution in Education?"I was captivated by his talk, and quickly arranged an interview with him. You'll notice that I organized the interview in slightly different order than his presentation (a .pdf version of which is available here)--while Michael started his presentation by talking about the ways in which technology has transformed business, I wanted to jump right into the discussion of educational technology and the history of education, then to look at the business examples. Even though I think Michael has some very interesting things to say about trends in business technology that are likely to be played out in education, I prefer to downplay that concept a little because I'm not sure that business examples are always the best ones to trot out for education (although, to Michaels great credit, I think he's largely on the mark).Here is Michael's COSN conference description of his original presentation (my notes on our interview follow):----Where is the Technology Revolution in Education? Essential Skills: Leadership and Vision, Education and TrainingComputer-based technologies have revolutionized business, politics, and entertainment. They have allowed businesses such as Amazon.com and Netflix to dramatically expand the range of products from which they generate profits by creating large niche markets. Political candidates employ tactics that profile and target customized messages to potential voters. Children and young adults are no longer dependent on broadcast networks and movie houses for entertainment, but instead instantly access media and games that spark their current interests. Yet, despite dramatic increases in the presence of computers in our schools and repeated efforts to increase use of technology by students and teachers, education has been largely unaffected by computer-based technologies. Students rarely use computers in schools and they have little choice in what and when they learn. Most teachers still stand and deliver a curriculum that is imposed from above. And the predominant model of education is nearly identical to that introduced over a century ago. Why is this? This presentation explores the many impediments that have limited the use of technology in today’s schools. We see how access, leadership, support, and test-based accountability impact the ways in which technology is used by teachers and students. Learning from lessons in business, politics and the entertainment industry, we also explore how computer-based technologies might support dramatic changes in how education occurs if we are willing to move away from the paradigm of schooling adopted a century ago. These changes include targeting learning so that it is aligned with the interests and needs of students, creating networks of learners instead of classrooms of students, and integrating what is currently separate fields of s[...]



SlideShare Presentation

2007-03-27T16:19:39.000Z

I'm testing to see if I can post a SlideShare presentation here, since it didn't work in the video section.


(object) I'm testing to see if I can post a SlideShare presentation here, since it didn't work in the video section.


(object)



Classroom 2.0 Blog

2007-03-23T18:12:49.000Z

Anyone can add a blog post here--and you can keep track of them using your RSS reader!
Anyone can add a blog post here--and you can keep track of them using your RSS reader!