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Preview: Out of Eight PC Game Reviews

Out of Eight PC Game Reviews



by James Allen http://www.outofeight.info



Updated: 2018-02-19T11:33:10.243-05:00

 



Empires Apart Beta Gameplay Preview

2018-02-19T07:34:43.522-05:00

I'm playing the beta of Empires Apart, a real-time strategy game by DESTINYbit and Slitherine.

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Currently, the game features skirmish games against the AI and online, plus survival matches. Randomized maps are available in several themes (desert, polar, et cetera). Five factions are present, which are enough to have subtle differences in military and economic strategy options. Resources (wood from trees, gold and stone from mining, and food from farms, fishing, roaming animals, or bushes) are finite, so mid-game migration is likely. Structures can be built to increase the population cap, serve as resource drop-off points, sell excess goods, recruit new units, or provide empire upgrades. New buildings and units are unlocked through expensive development research. Empires Apart is scheduled for release March 29th.



Wartile Gameplay Review

2018-02-16T05:31:26.949-05:00

I'm playing Wartile, a role-playing strategic board game by Playwood Project and Deck 13 Interactive.

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The game features a campaign with generally repetitive missions (keep going until you find something at the end of the map); new characters and items can be purchased between scenarios. Wartile does not feature randomized maps or a skirmish mode. The interface can be cumbersome, with mouse dragging used to move units and cards. This method lacks fluid movement in real-time and a misclick can waste precious seconds. The scenery also obscured the view as it lacks transparency. Wartile is a real-time game where movement and attacks have cooldown periods. Units will automatically engage nearby units, but specific enemies can be targeted. Ability cards can be used on enemy units, but the process is tedious (all cards of all units are not on screen simultaneously). Battle cards can also be used by spending points earned by killing enemies. Strategy involves attacking from higher ground and from behind while using cards at key moments, although Wartile lacks true strategic depth. Though Wartile looks like a compelling title, the limited strategic options, repetitive scenario design, and plentiful interface shortcomings make it an ineffective game.




The Islander Gameplay Review

2018-02-14T05:52:16.892-05:00

I'm playing The Islander, a click management game by 7 Box Games.

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The game features random maps onto which you place crops, bushes, trees, and livestock to make money. Simply mouse over each item when it is ready to harvest to earn cash. Placing decorations (like flowers and grass) will increase an income multiplier, and new items are (slowly) unlocked by leveling up. Helpers can automatically collect items, useful when the farm has grown too big for one screen. Every object requires the same interaction, as they will all grow on their own and simply need to be harvested, so the gameplay is repetitive. Items also grow in price exponentially, so past a certain point it’s not “worth” placing more of a particular item. Overall, The Islander is a relaxing click management game that lacks any major shortcomings.




Rise of Industry Early Access Beta Gameplay Preview

2018-02-09T05:52:55.808-05:00

I'm playing the early access beta of Rise of Industry, a  business management simulation by Dapper Penguin Studios and Kasedo Games.

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Currently, the game features a career mode with progressive building unlocks, a freeplay mode with no unlocks, custom games, and a brief tutorial. All game modes take place on randomized maps, which dramatically increases replay value, as town placement, resource locations, and city needs are different every time. A technology tree is used to unlock new buildings that gather raw resources, farm crops, produce goods, or transport items. The production chains offer many, many options for which goods to manufacture, and choices should be based on the limited, specific city demands. Goods are transported between factories with trucks, which can be sent out from depots to streamline logistics. Rail and boats can be used to transport goods further distances, especially later on when more complex, multi-step goods are being manufactured. Rise of Industry is scheduled for release by the end of 2018.



Wars of Succession Gameplay Review

2018-02-05T05:53:47.333-05:00

I'm playing Wars of Succession, a turn-based grand strategy game by AGEod and Slitherine.

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The game features five scenarios: a small tutorial that lacks instructions, three different start dates for the War of the Spanish Succession (1701, 1706, and 1709), and the Great Northern War of 1700. Apart from the very limited tutorial, Wars of Succession needs more smaller scenarios restricted in both theatre and time scale to welcome novice players. The game engine is the same as it was twelve years ago in Birth of America: sluggish. The vast majority of the game is as it has been in past AGEod titles: units placed into stacks lead by commanders, provinces to conquer and gain resources to recruit new units, automated battles based on stack postures and rules of engagement, regional decisions and events, limited diplomatic options, and passable AI. This iteration doesn’t bring any new features (apart from the setting) and highlights the limitations of the game engine as a whole. Despite the high level of historic detail, Wars of Succession lacks scenario variety and utilizes an increasingly outdated game engine.




Railway Empire Gameplay Review

2018-01-26T10:03:33.731-05:00

I'm playing Railway Empire, a transportation management simulation by Gaming Minds Studios and Kalypso Media.


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The game features a pleasant number of game modes, with a five-mission campaign, eleven scenarios with challenging objectives, a free mode where you can play in any region in 20-year increments, and a sandbox mode without AI opponents. The same maps are used for each game region, restricting replayability a tad by not randomizing resource locations. After placing stations near cities, farms, and mines, waypoint-based rails are placed to shuttle the trains back and forth. Signals can be used to direct traffic, and supply towers are needed to keep trains running at maximum speed. If citizen needs in a city are met, they grow, producing more money and unlocking additional industries. Personnel can be hired to buff trains, and research can be conducted to unlock new trains and enhance abilities. Once the map is full of trains, money can be invested in industry and stock of the competitors. The AI builds quickly and provides a good opponent. While Railway Empire might not be the complete heir apparent to the Railroad Tycoon series, it is an enjoyable management game with a good amount of content.






Valknut Gameplay Review

2018-01-23T05:49:41.583-05:00

I'm playing Valknut, a city building simulation by Dyrnwyn Games.


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The game features a ten-mission campaign, randomly generated skirmish modes, and a three-scenario tutorial (although you can’t access the third mission). The interface is entirely too small at high resolutions, there a limited keyboard hotkeys for performing actions, you have to manually rotate buildings (it won’t figure out the correct orientation on its own), and informative tool-tips about population and resources are not present (I have no idea what half of the icons mean, nor how many people work in a building or live in a house). Raw resources (wood, iron, stone, clay) are collected at certain buildings and processed at others (pottery, jewelry, rope, tools); only certain resources can be produced on each island (typically limited to specific crops), which may have had interesting strategic repercussions if the rest of the game was better. People randomly die due to hypothermia or starvation before you have a chance to build the appropriate buildings and even if sufficient supplies are available. Also, resource stocks can fail to grow (especially wood) with no indication as to why (is the wood being used? do you not have enough population to collect wood? is there an extra processing step?). Valknut is an unfinished game that doesn’t provide enough information on how your town is running.



Nantucket Gameplay Review

2018-01-18T10:32:35.842-05:00

I'm playing Nantucket, a role-playing seafaring strategy game by Picaresque Studio and Fish Eagle.


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Taking place during the height of whaling, the core of the game is business management: hunt whales, earn money, trade goods, hire crew, and upgrade the ship. Quests are available to search specific locations for new whales or find lost ships. Whaling areas are not randomized each game, which drastically reduces replay value (my only major complaint about the game). Naval encounters are resolved using cards and dice rolls: each crewmember has a chance of rolling a card each turn, which can attack enemies or buff friendly units. More experience crewmembers will have access to more interesting options for their cards, and striking a good balance of offensive and defensive possibilities is a core strategy of the game. Overall, Nantucket offers a unique setting for the business management game with satisfying, though repetitive, card-based battle resolution.



Sky Is Arrows Gameplay Review

2018-01-16T05:46:50.947-05:00

I'm playing Sky Is Arrows, a role-playing action strategy game by 2,000 Damage and Sometimes You.

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NOTE: The "P" key pauses the game. I am not good at reading directions.

A mixture of roguelike, action role-playing game, and real-time strategy game, the goal is to explore randomly generated levels to find the enemy castle that must be defeated before moving on to the next map. In each map, there are enemy encounters, loot chests, and items to provide bonuses. Gold can be spent to recruit new troops or improve your castle (to defend against the occasional enemy attack), and experience points are used to upgrade the stats of the hero. The game is light on features (you can’t save or pause the game (though each match is short, 15 minutes at the most), the maximum resolution is 1080, and hotkeys cannot be changed), though there is a selection of heros with different spells and the maps are different every time. Real-time battles are chaotic, namely because it is difficult to control troops (partially because they move on their own, and partially due to the control scheme that can’t be altered) and using spells can be imprecise. You never feel like you are totally in control of the battles, which makes them lose some appeal. While Sky Is Arrows has a unique combination of mechanics, the features and battles are lacking.




Orbital Racer Gameplay Review

2017-12-18T05:52:15.943-05:00

I'm playing Orbital Racer, a space racing simulation by Paweł Dywelski and Movie Games.

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The single-player-only game features checkpoint racing on twenty-four tracks in eight locations around our solar system; there are no randomized tracks, which would be seemingly easy to do in space. A career mode where race earnings can be spent on vehicle upgrades accompanies simple custom races. Handling can be done in either action or simulation mode, the latter of which has more realistic thruster-based flying and lacks powerups. The interface clearly indicates upcoming checkpoint locations for easier navigation. Powerups in the action mode are randomized and are given out every three checkpoints to all racers, which means everyone uses their weapons at the same time; a more interesting method would involve pickup locations away from the main racing line. Impact (causing damage) and EMP (causing controls to stop for several seconds) weapons come in launched missiles or dropped mines. A completely destroyed craft respawns at the last checkpoint. The AI is very good at handling both racing modes and provides a good opponent. Orbital Racer has a unique setting and simply needs some tweaks (random tracks, improved powerup distribution) to stand out.








Post Human W.A.R Gameplay Review

2017-12-14T05:53:39.027-05:00

I'm playing Post Human W.A.R, a turn-based strategy game by Studio Chahut and Playdius.


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The game focuses on online multiplayer, although there is no asynchronous multiplayer (a notable shortcoming for a potentially small community). In addition, there are three campaigns of six missions each that lack adjustable difficulty, and practice games against the AI (or a local player) on fourteen maps (but none are randomized). Units are purchased before battle: melee, ranged, flying, and support options are available that differ in health, movement, attack range, attack strength, defense strength, and special abilities. One unit is chosen by the player as the champion: if it is killed, that side automatically loses (no matter how many other units remain). This is an intriguing concept that involves how you choose who to be the champion, who you try to make the opponent think is the champion (it is kept a secret), and who you think their champion might be. Spare resources left over from unit recruitment (and later gathered from boxes scattered across each map) can be used to buff a unit’s attributes for one turn, adding to the pre-game strategy and in-game strategic options. The enemy totem can be destroyed to cause damage to opposing units each turn; this results in quicker games with less grind at the end. The AI is very good on the higher difficulty level, as are the human opponents found online. Post Human W.A.R has interesting factions and some unique gameplay elements.



SpellForce 3 Gameplay Review

2017-12-08T05:55:00.231-05:00

I'm playing SpellForce 3, a role-playing real-time strategy game by Grimlore Games and THQ Nordic.


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The game features a decent campaign with scenarios set in very detailed locations. The skirmish mode and online multiplayer both only have six maps and three races with very slight differences in build order. The interface comes with some handy features, like a larger mini-map that displays resource locations in each sector and single hotkeys used to cast spells from each hero. Resources (wood, food, stone, iron) are automatically gathered from the environment by workers assigned to a particular building; managing the limited number of workers at each building is part of the economic strategy. Upgrading the city or outpost will unlock the next tier of structures and increase the worker population. New map sectors can be captured after eliminating the creeps contained therein; while new sectors can expand resource production, items must be physically transported from one outpost to another (all done automatically), so you can destroy caravans of other factions. Heroes cast spells, gain experience through combat to unlock new spells, and have an inventory to increase stats. Regular units contain the usual assortment of infantry, cavalry, and ranged options. Units die quickly, which gives less time to use spells during combat. There is also a lot of grind at the end of games to eliminate bases, as defenses are cheap and very effective against smaller number of units. Still, SpellForce 3 has some good ideas in the economic side of the game with worker allocation and resource acquisition that, along with the occasional role-playing feature, make it stand out in the real-time strategy genre.



Harvest Life Gameplay Review

2017-12-04T05:50:10.328-05:00

I'm playing Harvest Life, a farm management simulation by bumblebee and rokapublish.


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Starting with the same farm every game, the tutorial only explains how to chop wood. There is also no manual or other in-game help or documentation, so almost all in-game tasks are left unexplained. The graphics are very rudimentary, and annoying collisions with nearby objects occur often. A limited interface (using left-click and right-click to interact with everything) leads to a lot of input confusion (feeding the cat instead of planting crops). Harvest Life only has a few repetitive tasks: cut wood and chop it during a bland mini-game, deal with crops by planting, watering, and harvesting, feed and provide water to animals while collecting their eggs and poop, and fish if you can figure out how to acquire a rod. Items can be sold (no price fluctuations) and the money used to edit the farm by placing new tiles and animals. There is a significant amount of waiting for something to happen, as there simply isn’t a lot to do. Harvest Life is an extremely repetitive, limited, boring, and confusing farming game.



Dominions 5: Warriors of the Faith Gameplay Review

2017-11-27T05:53:52.561-05:00

I'm playing Dominions 5: Warriors of the Faith, a turn-based strategy game by Illwinter Game Design.


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The venerable series returns with upgrades in several areas. First, bless effects are available when setting up your pretender god. The random map generator has been improved, and the graphics for the map and interface are much clearer, upgraded for higher-resolution displays. Recruitment points are now required for obtaining units (in addition to money and resources). The non-interactive combat is now “real-time”, where simultaneous actions (like moving and shooting) can occur at the same time. The fantastic core gameplay remains: choose one of the many nations, design your pretender god, expand by attacking surrounding provinces containing magic sites, defend new territories with a garrison to keep unrest low, build forts to collect nearby resources, spread dominion with temples and preaching, construct labs to research new spells, cast local and global rituals, recruit new units and hire mercenaries, set up army formations and battle orders, equip leaders with magical items, watch automated battles, and try to survive against the very capable AI. Much like its predecessor, Dominions 5 is more like an incremental upgrade, but overall it is a fantastic, feature-filled strategy game.



American Truck Simulator: New Mexico Gameplay Review

2017-11-15T05:50:05.567-05:00

I'm playing American Truck Simulator: New Mexico, a driving and management simulation by SCS Software.


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The first paid expansion for the game, the game now includes an entire new state to drive through, including very accurate expressway interchanges and a variety of truck stops. In addition, there are new roadside events (construction, wrecks, cops pulling people over) to gawk at during a drive through the Land of Enchantment. New Mexico in American Truck Simulation has a high level of detail and expands the game well.



Mare Nostrvm Gameplay Review

2017-11-07T05:54:57.370-05:00

I'm playing Mare Nostrvm, a turn-based naval strategy game by Turnopia and Slitherine.


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The game features twenty-four historic battles scattered across nine campaigns; victory is (thankfully) not required in order to advance to the next mission. Skirmish battles are also available against the AI, and online multiplayer utilizes Slitherine’s PBEM system. The interface badly needs a “next unit” button to find ships that can be issued orders in large, chaotic battles. Fourteen ship types can be equipped with a variety of weapons for firing upon and boarding the enemy. Ships must be near their commander to receive orders, requiring some organization during each conflict. Movement orders are placed on the map, along with choosing to ram or grapple and board the enemy ships (the decision of which should be based on the attributes and orientations of the ships involved). Ships will automatically fire on nearby enemies. The AI is skilled at the game, providing a competent opponent. Though repetitive and lacking some interface features, Mare Nostrvm is effective at displaying the chaos of ancient naval battles.



Command: Shifting Sands Gameplay Review

2017-11-01T05:46:58.230-04:00

I'm playing Command: Shifting Sands, a real-time military strategy game by Warfare Sims and Slitherine.


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The game functions as either an expansion to the original game that was released in 2013 or a standalone title, albeit without the ability to use the editor or enjoy the plentiful scenarios from Steam Workshop. Shifting Sands includes 17 scenarios of varying difficulties and complexities set in the Middle East, most of which are well designed with variety and surprises, and crafted a notch above the typical user-made mission. Command: Shifting Sands serves as a good introduction to the game mechanics of the series if you don’t feel like spending the exorbitant price on the entire game (though you probably should anyway).



Battlevoid: Sector Siege Gameplay Review

2017-10-27T05:44:53.726-04:00

I'm playing Battlevoid: Sector Siege, a real-time strategy game by Bugbyte .


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The games features a campaign mode with connected scenarios on randomly generated maps, but none of the researched upgrades or ship designs carry over from mission to mission, so it’s really just a series of skirmishes. There is cross-platform play where you can save and continue on another device, which is a nice feature. Before each mission, the crew composition can be set, which determines research rates, population caps, and build speeds. The interface is clearly designed for a mobile device, with inconsistent tool-tips and a lack of useful information: for example, the game should indicate when units have all weapon slots filled when in building mode, and it should more clearly display how often a component has been upgraded. Each map is covered with plentiful capture points that provide cash (to purchase things) and upgrade points (for upgrades), but scouting is tedious because ships move very, very slowly. Ships and defenses can be purchased, and all must be customized with weapons and other items like drones and defenses; designs can be saved for use later in the same scenario. In addition, there are researched upgrades that are applied to all ships, and specific upgrades for each component that can be added to a ship. Having both of these options is confusing and unnecessary, as choosing one or the other (I prefer the research route) would have sufficed. Units will auto-attack nearby enemies, but can be instructed to focus on specific subsystems. Enemy ships can also be boarded. Every mission lasts too long due to the slow speed of the ships and the high number of enemy units. Because of the pacing issues, interface shortcomings, perplexing research options, and lack of campaign continuity, Battlevoid: Sector Siege is not a successful adaptation of the series to the real-time strategy genre.



Real Farm Gameplay Review

2017-10-24T05:51:29.307-04:00

I'm playing Real Farm, an agricultural simulation by Triangle Studios and SOEDESCO Publishing.


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The single-player-only game features a career mode with a simple tutorial and a free play mode where you start out with basic equipment. The interface is terrible across the board: the camera is erratic, the mouse sensitivity cannot be adjusted, the keyboard controls cannot be changed and there is not a list of even what they are (only gamepad controls are listed in the options screen), the map is too small, and it can be difficult to get into equipment. While the equipment have good models, the graphics feature poor road textures at a distance and graphical glitches like glowing lines spanning across fields. The game world is small, with only occasional cars and nobody else working the fields (including workers you can hire). Gameplay consists of driving across the same fields over and over again using different attachments to plow, cultivate, sow, fertilize, water, and harvest crops. You can raise animals, but this offers only a small amount of variety. You can also take jobs at other farms, but they are the same jobs available otherwise. Vehicle handling is poor: every vehicle accelerates and brakes at the same rate, and getting stuck on small objects is too easy. Real Farm doesn’t offer anything new or different, and what it does offer is significantly worse than the competition.



Brass Gameplay Review

2017-10-20T05:52:14.598-04:00


I'm playing Brass, a turn-based strategy game by Cublo Games and PHALANX.


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Featuring both offline and online play, the goal is this board game adaptation is to accumulate victory points by (primarily) activating industries. Cotton mills and ports are activated by selling cotton at a port, while coal mines and iron works are activated once all of their resources have been used by other buildings or upgrades. Shipyards are automatically activated once built but require upgrades before they can be constructed. Money (the income of which is increased as industries become activated) is used to construct buildings in specific locations on the map, but only if a card displaying the city or type of industry is in hand. Canals, and later railroads, are used to connect cities, allow for more construction, and transport goods. Upgrading buildings will produce more victory points when activated, and loans can be taken as well. Halfway through each game, canals and level 1 buildings disappear, leading to a second scramble to develop. It takes several games to understand all the nuances of Brass, but the game does support multiple strategies for victory. The AI is good at the game as well, providing a very capable opponent. There are some stability issues with the game locking up during AI turns and crashing upon exiting, but overall Brass is a decent computer adaptation of the board game.



Stronghold 2: Steam Edition Gameplay Review

2017-10-18T05:50:17.598-04:00

I'm playing Stronghold 2: Steam Edition, a defensive strategy game by Firefly Studios.


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Free for owners of the Stronghold Collection (or available as a slightly cheaper standalone), this new edition of the classic game includes Steam-based multiplayer, Steam Workshop support for sharing maps, six new maps, and improved graphics. The defensively-focused gameplay of the Stronghold series remains intact, with both peaceful and combative scenarios available. The update is a nice way of keeping the game relevant and functional.



Ogre Gameplay Review

2017-10-16T06:23:38.245-04:00

I'm playing Ogre, a turn-based strategy game by Steve Jackson Games and Auroch Digital.

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The game features a ten-mission campaign of scenarios pitting a traditional army of infantry and armored units against a powerful enemy Ogre (essentially a super tank). Skirmish matches are also available online and against the AI, but there is only one map (with six different setups of starting units), though there is a scenario editor. There are not difficulty settings that would add (or remove) enemy units in single player mode or apply a unit handicap online. The interface is very basic, with tedious movement and arduous stacked unit selection. The game features both “classic” and “advanced” rules, the latter of which adds in stacking, combined attacks, and overrunning units. Gameplay consists of a movement phase and an attack phase, where targets and attackers are chosen to alter the combat odds. The AI is inconsistent, usually playing well using combined attacks and staying at range, but sometimes stopping for no apparent reason. While a very faithful adaptation of the classic strategy game, Ogre doesn’t offer enough enhancements in its digital form, such as a large selection of maps and a smooth interface, to appeal to many beyond those devoted to the series.



Dungeons 3 Gameplay Review

2017-10-13T09:04:45.538-04:00

I'm playing Dungeons 3, a dungeon management game by Realmforge Studios and Kalypso Media.


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Featuring a campaign that has a lot of the same hit-or-miss (mostly miss) humor as before, the game thankfully introduces random skirmish maps that can be used offline or online for vastly increased replay value. In addition, the interface is improved with an actual mouse pointer and better unit selection. The gameplay structure is the same as before: find the gold nuggets, place rooms to house units and produce resources, hire new units, and place defenses. However, new to the game is a research tree, which uses evil points accumulated by capturing locations on the Overworld map, forcing you to venture out of the dungeon in order to unlock the more advanced dungeon options required to win each scenario. While the flow of each game is the same, the random maps help immensely in creating a slightly different feel each time. The newest entry in the Dungeons series fixes the major problems from the last iteration by adding in random maps and improving the interface, finally making it a compelling management game.



Field of Glory II Gameplay Review

2017-10-13T05:53:59.029-04:00

I'm playing Field of Glory II, a turn-based strategy gane by Byzantine Games and Slitherine. width="320" height="266" class="YOUTUBE-iframe-video" data-thumbnail-src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/ijqBBKBnQGo/0.jpg" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ijqBBKBnQGo?feature=player_embedded" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>Utilizing gameplay similar to predecessors Pike and Shot and Sengoku Jidai but with vastly improved graphics, Field of Glory II has an impressive arsenal of features with randomized maps in all modes (except for historic battles) and tons of units and armies. Campaigns are connected scenarios (three, five, or seven) with minor decisions between missions; mission success is required to move on to the next battle in the series. In addition, there are completely randomized quick battles, custom battles with more options in scenario size, epic historical battles, and online PBEM multiplayer. The difficulty setting only affects the player’s army size and doesn’t make the AI any less formidable. The in-game tutorial is poor with annoying pop-ups and lacks specific instructions. The interface is familiar to anyone who has played a Battle Academy 2-engine game, though the new “move entire command” order is extremely useful for large battles. Colors on the unit flags indicate morale, but are difficult to see if the unit is turned sideways. Units are fitting for the era, including foot soldiers, archers, cavalry, elephants, chariots, and artillery. Generals improve unit movement within their command range. Units that are engaged in close combat cannot stop until one side breaks morale; thus, the general strategy is to lower morale with ranged units, then flank units from multiple sides once they are fixed in close combat. Certain troop types perform better against others, while terrain must also be considered. The AI is very capable, knowing how and when to use units. Easily the best game by the developer, Field of Glory II is an extremely satisfying turn-based strategy game with improved graphics, a better interface, tons of content (with randomized battles and lots of different armies), fairly intuitive rules, and proficient AI.[...]



Road Redemption Gameplay Review

2017-10-04T05:50:23.850-04:00

I'm playing Road Redemption, a combat racing game by Pixel Dash Studios and EQ-Games.


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The game features a campaign mode with missions that have one of three objectives: finish in the top three, kill a specified number of enemies, or beat the clock to the finish line. The scenarios become repetitive (the same handful of tracks are recycled each play through), but with permedeath and lots of enemies to contend with, the challenge level is high. Between missions, cash can be spent on upgrades or to recover health or nitro, and permanent upgrades can be enabled when you die. Beyond the typical racing game controls, additional buttons are used to use nitro,  attack to either side, switch between the classes of weapons (melee, sword, explosive, guns), defend against attacks, and kick other bikers off the road. There is strategy involved in choosing which weapon to use: swords are poor against helmets but good against shields, while explosives are great for vehicles and tight crowds. Eliminating an enemy grants cash, experience points, nitro, and a small health increase. Being able to quickly switch between weapons while avoiding being surrounded by enemies while keeping an eye on the road is key, something that becomes increasingly more difficult as the campaign wears on. Although the game gets repetitive, the high difficulty level and generally satisfying combat produces a fairly entertaining combat racing game.