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Dewey's Treehouse



Thirteen Years of Treehouse Talk



Updated: 2018-02-17T16:35:15.829-05:00

 



Quote for the day: Genuine, custom-packaged authenticity (pay with your credit card)

2018-02-17T16:35:16.045-05:00

"In a world of proliferating choice (consumer choice, that is), we are less prone [than we used to be] to feel we are deprived of an identity we value. In fact, it is likely that someone is trying very hard to understand what we feel is authentic so that it can be packaged somehow and sold to us in the form of a rebellious T-shirt or self-help book." ~~ Donovan Plumb, "Critical Adult Education in Canada in the Time of CASAE," New Directions For Adult & Continuing Education, 2009(124), 5-14.



"Karen's Doilies": An all-thrifted 10 x 10 wardrobe challenge

2018-02-16T13:49:21.298-05:00

It's time for another 10 x10 Wardrobe Challenge, created by blogger StyleBee. You choose 10 items, and use them to create 10 days of real-life outfits. If you haven't seen any of my 10 x 10 challenges before, I do them backwards, or maybe it's forwards: make the plan and take the photos before it starts, instead of posting it as it happens. I was inspired by this photograph of coloured-thread doilies, crocheted by the multi-talented Karen Glass.Lacy, loopy, intricate motifs; in plum and wine colours plus neutrals, and a few bonus flowers.Here are the clothesIn the photo below are (top) a tapestry-fabric jacket, a cardigan which I love but which got bumped from the list in favour of a poncho (see below); (bottom) a turtleneck sweater dress which works as a sweater (it's showing as brighter blue than it really is), a knitted vest, and a cotton pullover sweater.One openwork grey poncho, instead of the cardigan, plus its matching circle scarf. It seemed to work better with the crocheted theme, and I already had a jacket for something warm-with-sleeves.A collarless paisley print shirt which can also be worn as a cardigan, with a pair of dark-wash jeans; and a plum jersey t-shirt with a pair of grey cords.That makes nine items. I had thought about including this skirt, which goes with almost everything including the poncho.But I added a grey t-shirt instead, because I didn't really have enough tops there for ten days. Also, the coming week is going to be busy with a couple of extra meetings, but nothing dressy enough to need an extra skirt. The sweater dress will take care of anything not-pants. Most of these clothes came from the MCC thrift store; the cords came from Bibles for Missions (another thrift store); and the cotton sweater and poncho are from a consignment store.AccessoriesSo I'm thinking about Karen's doilies. What do I have that reminds me of those shapes and colours?Jewelry: some thrifted, some giftsCloseup of the earringsTwo extras, found at the thrift storeScarves and a shawl, all thrifted except for the little silk one (I've had it since I was a teenager)An extra infinity scarf, from the thrift storeHat made by daughterFour purses, all thriftedShoes, not all thrifted (sorry)Here's the listSaturday, February 17 Plan for the day: Errands (groceries), and finishing an annotated bibliography assignmentOutfit: jeans, raspberry pulloverAccessories: grey scarf with roses (or maybe the pink infinity scarf), flower-shaped earrings, grey boots, grey purseSunday, February 18 Plan for the day: Church, plus leading a class this weekOutfit: Sweater dress, grey poncho (not in the photo)Accessories: Scarf that matches the poncho. Earrings. Tights, flat shoes. Small purse.Monday, February 19Plan for the day: "Family Day" in Ontario, but we have no special plans, so I'll probably be doing online course work, writing a term paper on the value of reading in later life, and doing housework. Or we might go to a local art gallery.Outfit: cords, grey t-shirt, jacketAccessories: knitted hat, purse, boots, if we go out. Tuesday, February 20Plan for the day: Thrift store in the morning, "school" in the afternoonOutfit: jeans, plum t-shirt, paisley shirtAccessories: Earrings, purse, socks, shoesWednesday, February 21 Plan for the day: Afternoon meeting at thrift store Outfit: cords, grey t-shirt, jacketAccessories: tbaThursday, February 22 Plan for the day: At home, doing "school" and houseworkOutfit: Sweater dress, vestAccessories: fleece-lined tights, maybe some beadsFriday February 23 Plan for the day: Thrift store in the morning, course work in the afternoon, and evening CM study night Outfit: jeans, grey t-shirt, vest / swap for ponchoAccessories: tbaSaturday, February 24Plan for the day: Errands, and finishing off the week's class workOutfit: jeans, dress as sweaterAccessories: tbaSunday, February 25 Plan for the day: ChurchOutfit: cords, raspberry pulloverAccessories: paisley shawl worn as [...]



Better than a dozen roses

2018-02-14T15:46:50.016-05:00

Mr. Fixit and I went to the antiques market on Valentine's Day, and found just the right mirror for the blank space over this cabinet. It's also in the right spot to bounce light back from the balcony doors. You might think it's a funny Valentine, but I like it. 
For the sharp-eyed: the space to the left there was where we had the guinea-pig cage. Muffin and his hay were causing allergy problems, so he is now residing with with another family member (our family, not his).



Quote for the day: Abundance

2018-02-10T13:20:43.587-05:00

"To believe in abundance is to believe that we have enough...This thinking is a stretch of the imagination. It envisions social relationships in a different world, in a manna-based culture. It's a sharp contrast to a culture organized around commerce, a market ideology based on scarcity and the central premise that we cannot believe in sufficiency. It declares that we can never be satisfied with what we have, with the effect that customer satisfaction is truly an oxymoron." ~~ Peter Block, Walter Brueggemann and John McKnight, An Other Kingdom: Departing the Consumer Culture



Thrifting: how do you choose?

2018-02-09T19:07:29.802-05:00

Things I've found at the thrift store lately, with their rationalizations:

Silver and purple pendant necklace. Out of a whole rack of necklaces, why did I choose this one? Size, shape, and colour. I could see it fitting in with the clothes I wear most often. 
Plum-coloured jersey top with...poppies, maybe? The photo is showing purple, but it's more reddish, the same colour as the necklace. Why this one? It took a little more thinking: I don't usually buy clothes with pictures on them, and I do have a plum-coloured top already. But I liked the springy flowers very much, I like jersey t-shirts, and it is mostly cotton, not synthetic fabric. The fact that it was a half-price deal decided it.
Teal-green trench coat with a button-in lining  The winter weather has been "stink, stank, stunk," but by March this coat should get lots of use. Why this one and not some other coat? Honestly, need (and the fact that it was four dollars on the clearance rack)! I used to have a brown trench coat (no lining), and I wore it to church and places like that for years...and years. Finally I started to feel like a relic from 1989 every time I put it on, so I let it go, and I've been long-raincoat-less ever since. I did remove the shoulder pads on this coat, an easy fix since the inner lining isn't sewed down at the hem.
Conclusions: This story seems to need an ending. Here's one: know what you need, know what you like, know when to stop.



Quote for the day: Commitment to fish

2018-02-09T12:57:00.809-05:00

"It doesn't matter what the subject is; I want an ichthyologist to be as committed to fish as [A. Hyatt] Mayor is to prints--to make me think there's nothing more important to him...if we care about the writer we'll follow him into subjects that we could have sworn we never wanted to know about." ~~ William Zinsser, Writing to Learn



Such a very good Charlotte Mason post

2018-02-09T12:49:36.523-05:00

The Common Room blog posted recently about some essential CM connections.



Quote for the day: sometimes ideas are there and not there

2018-02-08T10:05:54.656-05:00

(image)  
"Ideas are everywhere, in the words and, so to speak, behind the words, present because they are literally present and present even if they appear to be absent. A writer may despise the idea of zoos and communicate that hatred by writing a book about animals in the bush, never mentioning zoos, never alluding to zoos or dropping a hint about zoos. Because of the way the mind works, we get the message...A book about the ethical nature of Christ may in fact be an argument against Christ's divinity. A book of recipes for winter soups made by cloistered monks may really be an argument against the modern world...If you picture a page of writing as three-dimensional, with the words hovering a half-inch or so above the paper, then you begin to see where the ideas are: behind the words, between the words, really everywhere." ~~ Eric Maisel, Deep Writing



Laugh for the day: faking it in fashion, 1967

2018-02-05T19:46:26.001-05:00

es, Mr.Stephens.Oh, Miss Warbell, I'm dying to ask you a question.- What is it? - Will boots be popular next year? I'd say that all depends on how Boots behaves herself this year.- Well, shall we go? I'm starved.- Yes.I don't want to leave without my notes.I hate to rush you through lunch, but I have a lot of notes to go through Oh, excuse me a minute.Oh, there you are, Miss Warbell.Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=bewitched-1964&episode=s03e27Endora, pretending to be a fashion journalist: Oh, there you are, Miss Warbell. I'm Miss Krovistrod. I write the fashion copy for Tate & McMann. I've seen your picture a million times... I would like your opinion about the new polyester fabrics...The Crone of Cawdor, masquerading as Miss Warbell the fashion expert: I think Polly Esther is as good as the next designer.Someone else asks Miss Warbell, "Will boots be popular next season?" Her response: "I'd say that all depends on how Boots behaves herself this year."(Bewitched, "The Crone of Cawdor")[...]



Quote for the day: Wolves wearing sheep suits

2018-02-03T03:00:24.995-05:00

"Besides, sweet reasonableness, more often than not, is a clever disguise for barely concealed self-interest." ~~ David. R. Williams, Sin Boldly!: Dr. Dave's Guide to Writing the College Paper



Some frugal finds, Part Three

2018-02-05T12:41:54.546-05:00

Yesterday's Frugal Finds post stopped with Part Two, but everything's better in threes. Here are the rest of the recent Frugal Finds.

A fun tweed skirt. The texture and colours don't show up well in the photo (my camera always puts in too much blue); there's actually a lot going on here between blue, green, grey, and beige. You can see it better in the earring photo (below).
Here's what it looks like with a green sweater, and a purple necklace I found at the thrift store. 
The tassel earrings came attached to the same bit of cardboard as the necklace, but I didn't notice them hiding underneath until later. 
I like the skirt and the jewelry, but this book was the real life-saver this week.



Quote for the day: the democratic right to grammar

2018-02-02T19:55:57.137-05:00

"Since we live in a competitive society in which the struggle for survival is primary, power exists, and power will have its symbols. Literacy is a far better tool and symbol of empowerment than any other, even money...However much you may hate grammar, think how much better a system ours is in which even the lowest peasant can achieve literary equality by learning rules of writing, spelling, grammar, and diction that are available equally to all and that apply equally to all." ~~ David R. Williams, Sin Boldly!: Dr. Dave's Guide to Writing the College Paper



A few frugal clothes finds: let someone else do the fixing

2018-02-02T20:30:36.436-05:00

"'I like your clothes awfully, old chap,' [the Rat[ remarked after some half an hour or so had passed. 'I'm going to get a black velvet smoking-suit myself some day, as soon as I can afford it.'" ~~ Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the WillowsPart OneI sometimes feel like the luckiest thrifter around. Many times when I've worried about needing something expensive, or finding what I need at all, something used but good pops up and reminds me not to be so anxious. There was that time I searched for pants, and finally found them on the clearance rack at the thrift store. (I'm still wearing those blue jeans.) There were the scarves, and the shoes, and the hat, and the cardigan, and the hook with a bird on it (or the bird with a hook on it)...and Lydia's bed, and the dining room table...well, you know the rest. (I probably forgot to mention the bed, it was a couple of years ago.)Last week I was looking for pants again; but nothing grey, because almost all my pants are grey. I found a pair of dark-wash, high-waisted jeans for $1.50, plus a pair of "skinnies" to replace my worn-out jeggings. The skinny jeans are labelled "khakis," which I find funny because they're navy blue. Anyway, I came home with the two pairs of not-grey pants, and a belt, and a book we're studying at church (I was using a borrowed copy), all for about ten dollars.The dark jeans fasten with a zipper plus three metal slide-plus-bar fasteners on the waistband. The zipper was fine, but two of the slides were missing. It looked like they'd never been added at all (maybe that's why the jeans were in such good condition). Walmart sells multi-packs of slides and bars for $5 (plus tax), but a) I wasn't quite sure how to insert them, and b) what was I going to do with the lifetime supply of extras? I decided to inquire at the same shop that took in a too-big skirt and hemmed my grey jeans, and sure enough they have promised to add two slides, for only a couple of dollars more than the Walmart package (plus tax). I'll be good for jeans (and blue khakis) for quite awhile.Part TwoI was thinking about summery colours, and along came this slightly crazy top with a giant beaded flower and lace sleeves.Yes, I bought it, because it was that kind of day. It really belongs with summer shorts, but it's not bad either with a purple jacket and grey jeans.[...]



Quote for the day: keep learning

2018-02-02T19:56:54.275-05:00

“You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honour trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then — to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting.” ~~ T.H. White, The Once and Future King



Free is a nice price: use what you're signed up for

2018-02-01T14:42:09.944-05:00

Sometimes we are entitled to more perks and benefits than we're using. Our apartment building has amenities such as an exercise room and a sauna. Your public library might have online subscriptions to databases or to language-learning tools that you thought you couldn't access. There might be something in the income tax laws where you live that allows you to (legally) deduct something you didn't know about. Or your automobile association card might offer special deals at restaurants or shoe stores (we've used both).

This week we realized that, because I'm currently registered at a university, and have an Office 365 student mailbox, we could also download a much newer version of Microsoft Word, an upgrade we badly needed. Free for subscribers, straight to the computer, just like that: one very big wow, and thank you Mr. Fixit for making that work. If you have someone in your house with a student email account, check it out.



A Flaky, Buttery Wednesday Hodgepodge

2018-02-01T08:51:12.558-05:00

1. Speaking of endings....at your wit's end, at loose ends, a dead end, burn the candle at both ends, all's well that end's well, or no end in sight...which 'end' phrase might best be applied to your life lately? Explain.  Well, no, not at loose ends: there's lots to do, including a class report due at the end of the week. But I am not at wit's end about it. Lydia is more the one burning candles here, since she is juggling high school (and its extra-curriculars) plus a part-time job.2. What was a must have accessory when you were growing up? Did you own one? If so tell us what you remember about it."How about a pair of pink sidewindersAnd a bright orange pair of pants?"Is a Sony Walkman considered an accessory?I did have a pair of '80's legwarmers around that time too.3. Something that made you smile yesterday?A giant art book about the Group of Seven, that came into the thrift store. I didn't buy it myself, but I hope somebody will enjoy it.4. January 30th is National Croissant Day. Do you like croissants? Sweet or savory? We're having chicken salad for lunch...would you rather have yours served on a croissant, a wrap, a bagel, bread, or a roll of some sort?I will eat croissants any way you want to serve them. They're best eaten absolutely fresh from some little bakery in Quebec; but I'm no croissant snob, I'll buy them on clearance at Walmart too.5. Sum up your January in fifteen words or less.Much time online but not for blogging: I'm doing my homework. Plus there's snow.6.  Insert your own random thought here.One thing leads to another: we were watching the detective series The Pinkertons, and that reminded me of an old mystery book my grandma had, Miss Pinkerton by Mary Roberts Rinehart. I downloaded that from Open Library and re-read it between other things. Then I wondered if it had ever been filmed, and it turns out yes, there is a 1932 movie with Joan Blondell and George Brent. You-tube has only a trailer (and it's pretty bad), but we found the whole movie for $3.99 on Google Play. We're not much in the habit of paying to watch movies, but decided to go for it anyway. It would cost me almost that much to bus to the library and pick up a free DVD.So we had our evening of black and white whodunit, with snow falling outside and discount store chocolate chip muffins in the kitchen. (Could have been croissants, but I had already bought muffins.) And that's the way we do things in this brave new world.Linked from The Wednesday Hodgepodge at From This Side of the Pond.[...]



Sunrise, from the balcony

2018-02-02T19:57:26.241-05:00




Wednesday Hodgepodge: Down the hatch

2018-01-24T15:38:34.859-05:00

1. January 24th is National Compliment Day. Is it easy or not so easy for you to accept a compliment? Share a recent compliment you've given or received.Not so easy: I was told early and often "don't show off."I was told by someone at the thrift store that I am a "book sorting machine." I took that as a compliment.2. Ten five little things you are loving right now.1. A rare sunshiny morning here, and we're getting the best of it through the balcony window.2. New-to-me sweater.3. A quick game of pool last night with Mr. Fixit (our building has a library-with-pool-table room).4. Online databases that have replaced having to hunt through the periodicals index. And you can use them at home, sitting in the sunshiny window.5. The colours of Janet Read's paintings.3. Would people describe you as a positive person? Do you see yourself that way? I read here  a list/description of eight things positive people do differently-Positive people find something to look forward to every day, they celebrate the small stuff, they're kind, they stay busy, accept responsibility for their actions, forgive themselves, know when to move on, and resist comparisonsWhich action on the list would you say you do regularly? Which action could you add to your life to give you a more positive outlook? If you're a positive person, what's something you do regularly that's not on the list?Whoah, that sounds like giving myself a compliment.Just say that yes, I work at those things, and appreciate them also in others. Everybody needs more "rainy day people" around.4. Homemade chicken soup, beef stew, or a bowl of chili...what's your pleasure on a cold winter's day?We have all three quite often, so I'm not sure. I might pick the chili because I like the cheese and tortilla chips that go with it, and I like making the leftovers into a taco salad.5. The best part of my day is....Depends on the day. It might be doing a thing I'm doing, or it might be finishing a thing I'm doing. Or it might even be thinking about something I'm going to be doing.6.  Insert your own random thought here.We got a bunch of decluttering books in the thrift store yesterday, which is a conundrum in itself. Did someone give up on decluttering, or are they now such experts that they don't need the books? Anyway, those led to an interesting conversation with one of the full-time staff, on the subject of fast fashion and donations and what's happening in countries like Kenya (Kenya doesn't want any more used clothes). The MCC store, like all the others, gets more clothes than it can sell, and has to dispose of the rest. Is the solution convincing people to buy less and hang onto their clothes longer? Blaming the industry and the retailers? Or concentrating on the disposal, landfill issues? The global garbage problem can feel like we're standing under a massive garbage chute and getting buried in falling bags, without any control over the situation. I think we need to see ourselves at the top of the chute instead, understanding that we're responsible for what we drop down there. The donations are good, and they all help support (in MCC's case) international programs like schools; but the fact that people have so much to donate, and keep on buying more to replace those things--that's the big problem.Linked from The Wednesday Hodgepodge at From This Side of the Pond.[...]



Thrift store seek and find (and a hack for the height-challenged)

2018-02-02T19:58:16.903-05:00

Many times the things I find at the thrift store are somewhat accidental; which is, of course, part of the fun of thrifting. Today, though, I had one thing in mind: a grey cardigan, and it had to be a nice one, not something grandpa would wear for yard work. I recently re-donated two grey blazers I wasn't wearing, so now I didn't have any grey "third layers." Since most of my pants and skirts are grey, that was definitely a gap. But I did not want a blazer (or I would have kept the other ones). OK then, a cardigan. But would this be a day when a grey cardigan might magically appear?

I checked through all the likely cardigan spots in the store, including the plus sizes, the blazer rack, the pullovers (sometimes one kind of sweater gets hung with another), even the women's suits, because you never know. I passed up any sweaters that were very lightweight or very embellished. This was the winner, and actually the only one that fit what I was looking for:


I liked the stripes; they lighten up the dark grey a bit. The sweater goes well with my grey corduroy skirt, and with my pants. It's warm enough, but not so heavy I'm bending under the weight (like one I bought last year). So Yay, to quote Vanita Bentley.

Here's the trick I promised: the large amount of fabric in a shawl-collared cardigan can easily swamp petite people. The easiest fix is to fold the collar and the front edges under. You're not trying to hide buttons or fancy collar details, so it still looks fine, just a bit more streamlined.

As always, thank you to the nice people who donate such good stuff to the MCC store. (Maybe somebody else out there will be blogging about their new grey blazer.)



Four book finds

2018-01-20T20:23:09.252-05:00


Recent thrift store book finds:

Sounding the Seasons: 70 Sonnets for the Christian Year, by Malcolm Guite

That Distant Land: The Collected Stories, by Wendell Berry

Deep Writing, by Eric Maisel

An Other Kingdom: Departing the Consumer Culture, by Peter Block, Walter Brueggemann, and John McKnight



On the longevity of clothes...or not

2018-01-24T14:01:19.245-05:00

I'm taking time out from studying the philosophy of adult education (really) to throw out a few thoughts on why we do or don't, should or shouldn't keep clothes around for years. It's two years since I started following Project 333, a.k.a. trying to get my own clothes thing together, so it seems like a good time to pause and remember what this was about in the first place.

I just read a post that could be summed up as "better but fewer, keep them forever" by a minimalist blogger. My reaction was "that could really make you feel guilty." My own first clothes page from two years ago has maybe ten things on it that I still own, and those were all fairly new (or new to me) then. Ironically, some of those ten things were the cheapest, the ones that theoretically should have fallen apart by now, like the stereotypical $8 grey t-shirt. So, point number one: cheap does not always equal lousy.

Do I see myself keeping what I have now for several more years? I probably will, because I like what I have, and  I'm wearing almost everything I own regularly. I don't have the particular problem of wearing 20 per cent of the clothes 80 per cent of the time. On the other hand, I have re-donated many of the clothes I tried out during the past two years. I got tired of them, the style was too young or too old, they made me look even shorter than I am, or whatever. Thank you, departing clothes, for teaching me what doesn't work, as Marie Kondo would say.

The last point is one on which I do agree with the article, and that is that you should not feel guilty about skipping whole categories of closet must-haves if they don't work for you. I've said it before myself, but it's always worth repeating: you may not be a pants person, or a white shirt person, or a little black dress person, or just a 2018-round-hole person. You may walk through an entire mall full of clothes, and dislike everything you see, because you are not "that" woman. You may also spend fifteen minutes at a thrift store, and find your favourite dress ever. It's not all about what things cost, or where they're made; it's also about how much we do or don't buy into what's new, what's normal, what everybody else buys; it's about what works for us. I had a classic denim shirt, but I recently handed it down to my daughter because it didn't work with anything, and fastening  the teeny little buttons drove me crazy. I like pullover tops better.

Ask who made your clothes, and think about the planet and the rivers and the landfills. But wear what makes you happy, hold onto it awhile if you can, and let the rest go.



Quote for the day: Jacques Barzun echoes Charlotte Mason

2018-01-14T13:44:40.984-05:00

"One of the virtues of learning anything is that it takes one out of oneself and into a subject--something independent existing out there, in the world of fact or ideas, or both. To pull the mind back into self-concern and self-excuse is not only a hindrance to learning, it is also a deprivation of the feeling of community with others." ~~ Jacques Barzun, Begin Here



Quote for the day: you make it sound easy

2018-01-14T13:45:15.683-05:00

"It's harder to begin a sentence well than to end it well. As we'll see later, to end a sentence well, we need only decide which of our ideas is the newest, probably the most complex, and then imagine that complex idea at the end of its own sentence. The problem is merely to get there gracefully." ~~ Joseph M. Williams, Style: Toward Clarity and Grace



Wednesday Hodgepodge: Never too late

2018-01-10T08:58:06.828-05:00

1. January is National Mentoring Month. Have you ever had a mentor? Been a mentor? How would you rate the experience?Not formally, on either end. There are people who have been my role models, often without knowing it, so I guess they are/were also mentors. (Can people in books be mentors?)2. What current trend makes no sense to you?Most of the current T.V. shows, both prime time and talk shows, at least such as I've seen of them (stuck in waiting rooms etc.).  Watching them makes me think I am from another planet.3. I saw a cartoon on facebook highlighting a few 'weird' things that make you happy as an adult. The list included-writing with a nice pen, having plans cancelled, freshly cleaned sheets, eating the corner brownie, cleaning the dryer lint screen, and sipping coffee in that brief time before anyone else wakes up. (Credit for the cartoon goes here) Of the 'weird' things listed which one makes you happiest? What is one more 'weird' thing you'd add to the list?All those things can be nice, with the exception of the lint screen. Corner brownies tend to have dry edges, though.How about...filling Christmas stockings?4. What's the last good thing you ate?The chicken soup Mr. Fixit made Saturday night, and that we ate for lunch on Sunday and Monday.5. Describe life in your 20's in one sentence.Version One: Worked at a university, met my husband, got married, bought a house, homebirthed a baby, homeschooled a kindergartner (ok, I was thirty, but close enough). Version Two: Stopped repairing my glasses with twist ties.6. Insert your own random thought here.Having read all three of Marie Kondo's books now (including the manga one), I have found points to differ on, and not just the usual animism issues. A big KonMari principle is that you tidy your space once and for all, and there are good reasons for that, but I'm finding the opposite is true here. We continue to improve and refine things, several months after moving. I worked on our clothes-and-linen closet last weekend, not the clothes but everything else that Kondo would call "cloth komono": tablecloths, towels, tote bags. All you see on the top shelf now are matching cloth bins...much more peaceful. Strangely enough, there was room at the end to add something: a basket of old towels and rags that we use for messy stuff, that had been taking up too much space in the storage room.So maybe KonMari would say that wasn't part of the original tidying, but just an improvement of storage. She might also say that all the cloth things wanted to be together, including the cleaning rags. Whatever...my point is that you can always make things better, and later is not too late.Linked from The Wednesday Hodgepodge at From This Side of the Pond.[...]



Thrifted scarf: roses in January

2018-01-10T19:31:06.054-05:00

The weather since Christmas has been icicles-hang-by-the-wall. Now we've gone from bitter cold to slop and slush, with the predictable result of one Squirrel (so far) feeling a bit ungood. There's definitely something yucky going around.

On a brighter note...how about a scarf featuring orange and fuchsia on a background of...I don't know, sort of olive-grey? It's bigger than it appears--it can even be a shawl. The floral pattern is on only one side, and the reverse shows very subtle little dots. You'd think at first that means "hide the backside," but I actually like the dots showing here and there. (DUH moment: I just figured out that it's meant to be reversible.)

I found it on my way out of the thrift store this morning, along with a book about Leonard Cohen for Mr. Fixit, and Joseph M. Williams' writing book Style for me. (One from this year's want-to-read list, so I was happy about that.)