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Preview: PHYSorg.com: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News



Phys.org provides the latest news on nanotechnology, nanoscience, nanoelectronics, science and technology. Updated Daily.



 



New technique to produce more durable and longer lasting lithium-ion batteries

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 06:22:45 EDT

Lithium-ion batteries are used to power many things from mobile phones, laptops, tablets to electric cars. But they have some drawbacks, including limited energy storage, low durability and long charging time. Now, researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) of A*STAR have developed a new way of producing more durable and longer lasting lithium-ion batteries. This finding was reported today in the Advanced Materials journal.



Switchable DNA mini-machines store information

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 14:00:14 EDT

Biomedical engineers have built simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two different shapes.



Tiny nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting/treating disease new review of work on exosomes

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:23:44 EDT

Tiny nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease - new review



Holey pattern boosts coherence of nanomechanical membrane vibrations

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 10:38:09 EDT

Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute have introduced a new type of nanomechanical resonator, in which a pattern of holes localizes vibrations to a small region in a 30 nm thick membrane. The pattern dramatically suppresses coupling to random fluctuations in the environment, boosting the vibrations' coherence. The researchers' quantitative understanding and numerical models provide a versatile blueprint for ultracoherent nanomechanical devices. Among others, this enables a new generation of nanomechanical sensors to probe quantum limits of mechanical measurements, and more sensitive force microscopy. The results are published in the prestigious scientific journal, Nature Nanotechnology.



Chemists create 3-D printed graphene foam

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 09:11:04 EDT

Nanotechnologists from Rice University and China's Tianjin University have used 3-D laser printing to fabricate centimeter-sized objects of atomically thin graphene.



Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 08:00:02 EDT

Versatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that mimicking the structure of the "powdery alligator-flag" plant has enabled them to make a graphene-based aerogel that meets these needs.



Researchers developed nanoparticle based contrast agent for dual modal imaging of cancer

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 10:31:19 EDT

Researchers from PSG College of Technology, India have developed nano-contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as optical imaging of cancer cells. This report will appear in the forthcoming issue of the journal NANO.



Neuron transistor behaves like a brain neuron

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 09:30:02 EDT

(Phys.org)—Researchers have built a new type of "neuron transistor"—a transistor that behaves like a neuron in a living brain. These devices could form the building blocks of neuromorphic hardware that may offer unprecedented computational capabilities, such as learning and adaptation.



Enhanced photocatalytic activity by Cu2O nanoparticles integrated H2Ti3O7 nanotubes

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 09:25:07 EDT

Why do we construct nanocomposite for the photocatalytic oxidation desulfurization?



Using photoluminescent nanorods as ultimate probes of fluid flow

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 08:10:01 EDT

A Franco-Dutch international collaboration involving researchers from the laboratories of Condensed Matter Physics and Hydrodynamics at Paris-Saclay University and the Van't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences at the University of Amsterdam has resulted in a new method for very precise determination of fluid flow in capillary networks in realtime. Their proof-of-principle is published in this week's edition of Nature Nanotechnology.



Sugar-coated nanomaterial excels at promoting bone growth

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 13:06:44 EDT

There hasn't been a gold standard for how orthopaedic spine surgeons promote new bone growth in patients, but now Northwestern University scientists have designed a bioactive nanomaterial that is so good at stimulating bone regeneration it could become the method surgeons prefer.



Of wrinkles and wires: Capillarity-induced skin folding spontaneously forms aligned DNA nanowire

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 09:30:01 EDT

(Phys.org)—Nanowires fashioned from DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)—one of several type of molecular nanowires incorporating repeating molecular units—are exactly that: Geometrically wire-like DNA-based nanostructures defined variously as having a 1~10 nm (10−9 m) diameter or a length-to-diameter ratio >1000. While nanowires can be made from several organic and inorganic materials, DNA nanowires have been shown to provide a range of valuable applications in programmed self-assembly1,2 of functional materials—including metallic and semiconductor nanowires for use in electronic devices—as well as biological, medical, and genetic analysis applications3,4,5. That being said, DNA nanowire adoption has been limited due to historical limitations in the ability to control their structural parameters—specifically, size, geometry and alignment. Recently, however, scientists at Korea Institute of Science and Technology and Princeton University leveraged the capillary forces of water containing DNA molecules to demonstrate size-controllable straight or undulated aligned DNA nanowires that were spontaneously formed by water entering wrinkled channels of a compressed thin skin on a soft substrate, which subsequently induced a wrinkle-to-fold transition.



Using sunlight to the max

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 09:03:20 EDT

Materials called transition-metal carbides have remarkable properties that open new possibilities in water desalination and wastewater treatment. A KAUST team has found compounds of transition metals and carbon, known as a MXenes but pronounced "maxenes," can efficiently evaporate water using power supplied by the sun.



New chemical method could revolutionize graphene

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 03:40:01 EDT

University of Illinois at Chicago scientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics.



A mechanical trigger for toxic tumor therapy

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 03:31:23 EDT

Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancerous and transform into tumors. Some, like skin cancer, are relatively accessible to treatment via surgery or radiation, which minimizes damage to healthy cells; others, like pancreatic cancer, are deep in the body and can only be reached by flooding the bloodstream with cell-killing chemotherapies that, ideally, shrink tumors by accumulating in their ill-formed blood and lymph vessels in higher amounts than in vessels of healthy tissues. To improve the low efficacy and toxic side effects of chemotherapies that rely on this passive accumulation, a team of researchers at the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, Boston Children's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School has developed a new drug delivery platform that uses safe, low-energy ultrasound waves to trigger the dispersal of chemotherapy-containing sustained-release nanoparticles precisely at tumor sites, resulting in a two-fold increase in targeting efficacy and a dramatic reduction in both tumor size and drug-related toxicity in mouse models of breast cancer.



Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of the diffusion and rotation of fullerene molecu

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 11:10:02 EDT

Carbon is one of the most versatile elements: it forms the basis for an enormous number of chemical compounds, it has several allotropes of different dimensionality, and it exhibits many different bonding geometries. For this reason, carbon materials have had a special place in materials research for a long time. Although the three-dimensional forms of carbon—diamond and graphite—are known since ancient times, it took until 1985 before the first low-dimensional carbon allotrope, the quasi-zero-dimensional fullerene, was discovered. Soon after this, in 1991, the one-dimensional carbon nanotubes were brought to the attention of the scientific community, and in 2004 the two-dimensional carbon allotrope, graphene, became experimental reality. Different combinations of carbon allotropes such as fullerene-filled carbon nanotubes (carbon peapods) and graphite intercalated by fullerenes have been made already.



3-in-1 device offers alternative to Moore's law

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 07:00:01 EDT

In the semiconductor industry, there is currently one main strategy for improving the speed and efficiency of devices: scale down the device dimensions in order to fit more transistors onto a computer chip, in accordance with Moore's law. However, the number of transistors on a computer chip cannot exponentially increase forever, and this is motivating researchers to look for other ways to improve semiconductor technologies.



How gold binds to silicone rubber

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 06:20:03 EDT

Flexible electronic parts could significantly improve medical implants. However, electroconductive gold atoms do not easily bind to silicones. Researchers from the University of Basel have now modified short-chain silicones to build strong bonds to gold atoms. The results have been published in the journal Advanced Electronic Materials.



Magnets, all the way down!

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 14:25:33 EDT

In many ways, magnets are still mysterious. They get their (often powerful) effects from the microscopic interactions of individual electrons, and from the interplay between their collective behavior at different scales. But if you can't move these electrons around to study how factors like symmetry impact the larger-scale magnetic effects, what can you do instead?



Silver atom nanoclusters could become efficient biosensors

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 11:04:33 EDT

Researchers have now managed to pinpoint what happens when light is absorbed by extremely small nanoclusters of silver atoms. The results may have useful application in the development of biosensors and in imaging.



Hybrid membrane creates a stir on the global market

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 10:59:05 EDT

The news story made a big splash: in January 2016 ETH researchers Professor Raffaele Mezzenga and his senior researcher Sreenath Bolisetty published a study in the journal Nature Nanotechnology about an innovative type of membrane developed in their laboratory.



Nanoparticle aggregates for destruction of cancer cells

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 09:19:42 EDT

An international team in which a UPM researcher is involved has shown that it is possible to mechanically destroy cancer cells by rotating magnetic nanoparticles attached to them in elongated aggregates.



Breakthrough in thin electrically conducting sheets paves way for smaller electronic devices

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 05:44:07 EDT

Queen's University Belfast researchers have discovered a new way to create extremely thin electrically conducting sheets, which could revolutionise the tiny electronic devices that control everything from smart phones to banking and medical technology.



Chemists perform 'surgery' on nanoparticles

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 16:31:14 EDT

A team of chemists led by Carnegie Mellon University's Rongchao Jin has for the first time conducted site-specific surgery on a nanoparticle. The procedure, which allows for the precise tailoring of nanoparticles, stands to advance the field of nanochemistry.



Graphene offers new functionalities in molecular electronics

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 08:30:02 EDT

An international team of researchers led by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the University of Bern has revealed a new way to tune the functionality of next-generation molecular electronic devices using graphene. The results could be exploited to develop smaller, higher-performance devices for use in a range of applications including molecular sensing, flexible electronics, and energy conversion and storage, as well as robust measurement setups for resistance standards.



Researchers engineer transformer-like carbon nanostructure

Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:16:01 EDT

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has engineered a new type of carbon nanomaterials, capable of changing shapes and colors depending on the type of solvents used. Such materials have attracted much attention owing to their unique optical properties and structures.



New form of carbon that's hard as a rock, yet elastic, like rubber

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 14:00:02 EDT

A team including several Carnegie scientists has developed a form of ultrastrong, lightweight carbon that is also elastic and electrically conductive. A material with such a unique combination of properties could serve a wide variety of applications from aerospace engineering to military armor.



Simulations pinpoint atomic-level defects in solar cell nanostructures

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 09:12:31 EDT

To understand the nature of something extremely complex, you often have to study its smallest parts. In trying to decipher the universe, for example, we search for gravitational waves or faint waves of light from the Big Bang. And to comprehend the very essence of matter itself, we break it down to the subatomic level and use computer simulations to study particles like quarks and gluons.



Graphene specimen support technique for low voltage STEM imaging

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 08:30:02 EDT

Developing new scientific devices pushing the limits of what we can observe and measure does not occur overnight. There are typically baby steps involved, small and continuous improvements to counter the numerous technical hurdles arising on the way. The new state-of-the-art electron microscope developed by Prof. Tsumoru Shintake at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) is no exception to the rule. Through the development of this one-of-a-kind microscope, OIST researchers reported such a crucial step in the journal Microscopy using atom-thin layers of graphene to enhance microscopic images of minuscule viruses.



Observing electrons surfing waves of light on graphene

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 06:29:16 EDT

Researchers have studied how light can be used to observe the quantum nature of an electronic material. They captured light in graphene and slowed it down to the speed of the material's electrons. Then electrons and light started to move in concert, manifesting their quantum nature at such large scale that it could observed with a special type of microscope.