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Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

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In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

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And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.

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Build a Dual-Purpose Sofa, Create an Automatic Indoor Garden, 3D-Print Your Own Pens & More

DIY Leather Bracelet w/ Magnets

Linn from Darbin Orvar creates a functional wearable that ensures screws are always on hand during a build:

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Custom Wood TV Remote

David Picciuto creates a wooden TV remote control using a CNC mill and a laser cutter:

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How to Make an Ocean Table

Bob Clagett uses concrete and epoxy resin to create a tabletop that looks like a cross section of the ocean:

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Star Key Spinner

Laura Kampf creates a DiResta-inspired "star key," this one equipped to spin:

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DIY "Zig Zag" Sofa

Ben and Jess of HomeMade Modern create a couch with a countertop for seating people behind it:

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Setting Up an Automatic Indoor Garden

Super cool! Ben and Jess create two types of space-efficient indoor gardens using a Click and Grow system:

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Custom Designed 3D Printed Pens

Ben Brandt designs and 3D-prints his own pens, showing you most of the CAD work that went into it too:

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Do You Know This Rabbit?

The Guardian has an obituary here, and The Telegraph, here.  See some of his non-Miffy graphic work here.

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How to Epoxy Voids in Wood, Make Your Own Kitchen Knife, Pour a Concrete Coffee Table and More
Kitchen KnifeJimmy DiResta needs a new kitchen knife. He could go buy one, or he could make one—from scratch. The way that he marks the centerline of the edge of the bar stock, and uses an out-of-square length of wood to grind the blade angle, is very clever: width="1280" height="720" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/um4MKLvZ_VU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="height: 371.25px; width: 660px;">Triple Tenon Joined Lumber RackMatthias Wandel engineers a very atypical and space-efficient structure for a lumber rack: width="1280" height="720" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nVk8ZaHMxHA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="height: 371.25px; width: 660px;">Push Stick Saw Frank Howarth gets artistic with his push stick design: width="1280" height="720" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Berd7odbnhU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="height: 371.25px; width: 660px;">"Goodbye Shop"This is kind of a shocker! After all of the work April Wilkerson put into kitting out her shop and improving her home and property, she and her husband are selling the place. I did not see this coming. width="1280" height="720" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pqKkXpx52zA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="height: 371.25px; width: 660px;">Epoxied and Sandblasted Live Edge Slab Coffee Table You might think creating a live edge table is just a matter of throwing the slab on the legs. Not so. Here Marc Spagnuolo shows us how to epoxy voids in the wood, use a sandblaster to clean up the live edge, and goes over in detail the crucial finishing process: width="1280" height="720" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pcIEILwU45w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="height: 371.25px; width: 660px;">Finishing ExperimentsFinishing seems like such a black art that I'm always glad to see people giving tips or doing experiments with it. While the first three minutes of this video is the Samurai Carpenter turning bowls, he then explains how he's using epoxy resin (as Spagnuolo did above, to repair voids) and experimenting with some "Turbo Cure" and wax. At the end he announces he's got a trio of new Japanese saws for sale on his site: width="1280" height="720" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/O36g86hAyNA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="height: 371.25px; width: 660px;">DIY Coffee Table with a Concrete TopBen of HomeMade Modern uses his plywood/reinforcing mesh/concrete technique to create a coffee table: width="1280" height="720" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oCyrc-l9hUc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="height: 371.25px; width: 660px;"> [...]



Animated Infographics About Everything, a Nike HyperAdapt Teardown and the Unexpected Ways Movie Sound Effects Are Made

Core77's editors spend time combing through the news so you don't have to. Here's a weekly roundup of our favorite stories from the World Wide Web.

Animagraffs—Animated Infographics About Everything

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A collection of 3D animations exploring the inner workings of mechanisms and systems. Each object is explored in detail, using detailed cutaway, animated, 3D visualizations. Each animation can be rotated through 360 degrees and zoomed in and out for detailed observation. The Anima Graff team works extensively in the transportation field, but also examines musical instruments and other pieces of technology.

—Stuart Constantine, publisher and managing partner

Nike HyperAdapt Teardown

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Here's how self-lacing sneakers work because I'm a sneaker addict can't stop staring at this. 

—Emily Engle, assistant editor

Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

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An article about how family heirlooms and possessions aren't being passed down and retained these days; the "Ikea and Target generation [doesn't] have the emotional connection to things that earlier generations did." Old furniture get tossed and antiques prices are dropping to the point that PBS's "Antiques Roadshow" has even revised the appraisals on their re-runs!

—Rain Noe, senior editor

The Unexpected Ways Sounds in Movies are Made

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Just a fun Friday video for you here featuring the Foley artist John Roesch, who has worked on films like "Back to the Future" and "E.T." engineering Hollywood-quality sounds with the help of a warehouse full of mundane objects.

—Allison Fonder, community manager

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Air-Ink: Painting With Pollution
Even if you don't live in a hip neighborhood, art might be in the air. The designers behind the Kaalink pollution filter want to keep airborne carbon out of the atmosphere and back in your sketchbook. Their project, called Air-Ink, is a result of several years of research at MIT's Media Lab, where the team investigated ways to harness and repurpose particulate matter caused by daily combustion. Even with required filters the world's cars, stoves, and fires send out loads of extremely harmful pollutants that contribute to smog, environmental degradation, and poor health outcomes. Is it possible to reuse some of that mess before it hits the air? width="1200" height="675" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1295587226/air-ink-the-worlds-first-ink-made-out-of-air-pollu/widget/video.html" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" style="height: 371.25px; width: 660px;"> After a lot of tinkering their solution was the Kaalink filter. It's an add-on chamber that catches particulate leaving an exhaust pipe without creating dangerous back pressure. The unit catches carbon and other bits left over from incomplete combustion, the particles of which are just one or two micrometers across, and small enough to easily lodge in your lungs for nasty surprises later.Taking the produced schmutz out of the filter, the team decided to strip out the carbon from the more harmful heavy metals, and convert it for creative use. The carbon is crushed, refined, and processed with traditional solvents to create a deep ink useful for illustration, lettering, and painting. The Air-Ink produced is freshly up on Kickstarter and already well over goal for a first production of markers, paints, and screen printing kits. The current campaign is offering 2mm, 15mm, 30mm and 50mm chisel and thin tip markers, as well as a 150ml screen printing ink set, with sights set on oil based paints, fabric paints, and weatherproof options in the future. Though the output is averaged, they estimate that going through 30ml of Air-Ink would use 45 minutes worth of pollution output. Bit vague metric, but that's probably a bit of a gram saved from the city air and streets.The ink and their markers are said to be safe, refillable, high-quality, and water resistant. While artists tend to have strong feelings about their material choices, they also tend to believe in creative problem solving, and these idealistic pens seem to have breathed some life into green material solutions. [...]



This McDonald's Concept Straw Is Mocking Designers

Halfway between my obsession with over engineered mundane products and my hardened vulgar-marxist heart, is an overriding appreciation for satire. And somehow McDonald's has my number—probably yours too.

Whether you enjoy their disgustingly sweet slurries or shy away from that corporate BS maaan, this new video (and yeah the product) do a great job of nailing the breathy designer videos we love to love. And make. 

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The straw itself seems like a fun campaign to tap into slick product packaging and design trends while addressing trivial milkshake-straw dilemmas. But the brilliance of the Suction Tube for Reverse Axial Withdrawal is in its willingness to pitch a shot for shot simulacrum of design language at the general public. 

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I guess that means we've made it. Or totally lost it? You tell me.

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A Non-Contact Thermometer Designed to Reduce the Spread of Germs
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Global Prime Healthcare was looking to add an innovative thermometer to their product line to cater to infants and children, particularly sleeping babies. Our design integrates a digital LCD screen onto the ergonomic device, complete with an intuitive guidance system to secure positioning and confirm accurate results. Our vision was to have an approachable, straightforward design with the benefits of being non-contact to reduce the spread of germs. Simply press the button to engage the harmless infrared light onto the child’s forehead, providing parents and physicians with a fast and no-fuss method of taking temperature.

View the full content here(image)



Old-School Design for a Rotating Hardware Organizer
I came across this intriguing design for a rotating small parts organizer in a 1948 issue of Popular Mechanics.It would be nifty to see it wall-mounted, as the ad describes, though it doesn't seem it would make much sense for it to be ceiling-mounted.I did a quick search to see if these exist on the secondhand market, and found a photo of one in this Ithaca classified.One thing I couldn't figure out was how to lock it in place. These are presumably meant to hold hardware, which can be heavy, and a bin loaded up with carriage bolts is going to be a lot heavier than one loaded with wood screws and gravity would have its way. But then I found this one on eBay:In the photo below we can see a wingnut on the end of one axis. The user presumably used this to lock it in position.We can also see that at some point, two of the bins went missing or became damaged, and a previous owner replaced them with pine or fir dividers attached to hulls made from what looks to be veneer. (At first I thought they were sheet metal, but you can see grain.)The 1948 ad up top indicates it's designed for hobbyists. But this much older wooden version that I also found on eBay, dated 1882, is labeled as belonging to a hardware store.There's no guarantee it is, of course, but the fact that it's patented and the organized numerical markings would indicate it was. As for how it works, here we can see that knobs A are used to rotate it, while lever B locks it into place, presumably by registering an unseen protrusion into slots C.I do wonder what it held. It seems obvious they were fasteners, with the first number indicating the fastener's length; you'll notice the first number for each bin corresponds with the distance between the dividers (i.e. the dividers get further apart from the "1 1/2" row to the "1 3/4" row and so on).I figured the second number indicated the screw size number that we use today to indicate diameters (i.e. a #8 screw is 0.164" in diameter, a #10 screw is 0.19" in diameter and so on). So that the section saying "1 3/4 - 9" would contain #9 screws that were 1 3/4" long.However, something didn't sit right here so I looked it up. While the case is clearly branded "1882," ASME—the American Society of Mechanical Engineers—didn't standardize screw dimensions until 1907, some 25 years after this case was patented. (Prior to that manufacturers used whatever dimensions they found convenient.) I suppose it's possible that the designers of this case just happened to be using the dimensions and numbering convention that ASME eventually adopted.Anyways, here's the funny part. I spotted another of these cases on LiveAuctioneers.com:It sold for $500 back in March of 2016. The one on the eBay listing above is currently selling for a whopping $6,400. Then I realized, by comparing the photos: They're the exact same case.I understand that the person who bought it for $500 had to pay for shipping and perhaps his/her own travel, but man, what a racket! That's almost a 1,300% markup! [...]



Design Job: Human After All! simplehuman is Seeking a Senior Designer in Torrance, CA
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simplehuman is seeking a full-time Senior Designer with broad experience in both Print and Digital Media design. You’ll collaborate closely with the Creative Director to develop and execute multiple design briefs. This is a senior level position that requires strong project management ability and some experience with art

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The 2017 Design Salary Survey Is Officially Live, and We Need Your Help
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2017 is officially in full swing! For some of you, that means you're just starting up at your new job, and for others it means embarking on another year of a job you either love or hate. If you happen to fall into any of these categories, we need your help! Since 2001, Coroflot has collected and reported salary information from tens of thousands of design and creative professionals around the world. We've been able to do this with the help of our community, who we rely on to enter their own information. The Design Salary Guide is a valuable resource for your own salary negotiations or as a resource when building your team.

The Salary Guide offers plenty of benefits. For starters, it's a rolling tool, available year-round and reporting the results in real-time. We have a pool of over 65,000, with useful data on dozens of job titles from around the world. Our range includes over 50 job titles, so there's something for every creative role! All of the data is collected on a city level, allowing us to report results on a more granular, hyper-local scale (in addition to broader trends). You can even enter freelance hourly rates, and in turn we report on freelance hourly rates. We collect and report on salaries and hourly rates in local currencies around the world. Our charting tool shows the 25th percentile, median, and 75th percentile of earnings at all times. If we have enough data, we split it up into more detail. Any data you submit is completely anonymous, so there is zero risk in completing the survey.

Built by designers, for designers, Coroflot has always had a strong community of talented creative-types. We invite you to take a peek around and add your info to the Salary Guide. It literally takes less than 1 minute to participate. The more data we can collect and summarize, the better accuracy we'll have. And of course, share it with your friends!

Keep your eyes peeled for Salary Guide news as we'll have more exciting tidbits to share in the coming weeks.

Enter your data by March 14th to receive Coroflot's annual report on design salaries.

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Uncovering Tools That Haven't Been Touched Since 1941
Hey readers, here's Part 2 of the New Deal tool chest find (Part 1 is here) by guest writer Dr. James E. Price. Dr. Price is an anthropologist, archaeologist and an accomplished joiner. You'll find his bio down at the bottom. He's managed to acquire a toolbox, still filled with tools, originally issued by the U.S. Government in 1933 for the Civilian Conservation Corps (read our story on the CCC here). It's a very rare find with great American historical significance.The rest of the entry is in Price's words, edited for length and clarity. The photos and captions below are his.Dr. Price writes:Each of the tools in the chest was numbered by a stamp or engraving on the tool itself and there is a numbered brass tack beside the place it goes in the chest. I promised you that I would feature the tools on this page one at a time and you can assist with the research of its manufacturer, the years it was offered, a picture of it in a period catalog, or any other information pertinent to each tool.We start this evening with the claw hammer which is Number 32 and is secured in the top till by a brass spring clip. The manufacturer's imprint is on one cheek of the hammer and the other side is stamped "USVA". The latter stands for The US Veterans Administration. They were used at The VA Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri. Thank you for sharing your knowledge about a tool if you have information on it.The subject clawhammer is in the top till. The imprint has been damaged but it appears to read, "C. OGDEN, NEW YORK". The "C" is somewhat questionable. You can see the original inventory number stamp, "32", on the wooden handle right behind the head. The other side of the hammer head is stamped, "USVA". Next I continued cleaning and stabilizing tools in the top till. Here I'll show you the three little Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers and two awls. The three screwdrivers are on the upper left of the photo below, each one in a spring clip with their tips in slots in a piece of wood glued in the end of the till. They are each marked "26". One of the awls, the one with a beech handle, marked "25" is above the screwdrivers and the other one with an ebonized handle, stamped, "48" is to the left of the hammer. All the tools in the top till are marked, "USVA".This is a closeup of the three Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers. The words "STANLEY HURWOOD, PAT. APPL'D FOR" are stamped on the handle of each screwdriver. The handles appear to be rosewood. This awl is stamped "25" and the handle is beech. In small letters the wood is stamped "BUCK MFG. CO." The upper awl has an ebonized handle with no manufacturing marks but is stamped "48". It is likely the tools were issued in 1933 or 1934 and probably never used after the beginning of WWII. The chest and its tools gives us an intimate view of what was needed by finish carpenters in those years. To my knowledge no other complete government-issued tool chest and its contents survived from The New Deal Era so this one is a unique cultural resource that demands careful preservation and study. Hand-tool beginners who frequently ask what tools they need, take heed. If you assemble a set of tools of the functional types found in this chest, you will have enough tools to make lots of wonderful wooden things.The photo below shows the back left corner of the bottom of the chest. Note the three gimlets resting in holes in an upright board and the block plane secured to that board with a leather strap. The tools were rusty from being in the bottom of the chest. Tools in the three tills above this bottom tier are not nearly as rusty. The block plane is a Stanley 220 and the blade has been hollow ground so it saw use. The japanning is near 100%. This photo shows the disassembled plane after cleaning. No attempt was made to remove [...]



Hand Tool School #19: Helpful Video Tip for Using a Hand Saw Properly
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I hear from woodworkers all the time who struggle with their hand saws. Usually it has to do with just getting the cut started. Starting your cut is all about taking the weight off the toe of the saw so that the teeth can glide over the wood. Some people like to go backwards first, but a starting backstroke does nothing but mangle the wood and makes your cut more about guesswork than precision.

On a recent WoodTalk episode, I answered a question about this and launched into a complex explanation of an exercise designed to improve your feel for starting the saw accurately. But describing that exercise is where the audio medium fails and video is much better. Hence this video:

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There are of course things you can do to the toothline of your saws to make them easier to start—like relaxing the rake angle of the first 10-20 teeth or using a finer pitch for the first 10-20 teeth. However I can't help but feel that is extra work when all that is really needs is a little improvement in technique and a greater feel for the saw. Both of which will vastly improve your sawing accuracy across all your woodworking.

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This "Hand Tool School" series is provided courtesy of Shannon Rogers, a/k/a The Renaissance Woodworker. Rogers is founder of The Hand Tool School, which provides members with an online apprenticeship that teaches them how to use hand tools and to build furniture with traditional methods.

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The Books Every Designer Must Read
Today's topic is a common but important one: what's one of the books that got you interested in pursuing design? What's a book that continues to inspire and influence your work? On the Core77 discussion boards, maehoosadie asked the experts in our design community: what are the best and brightest books out there for designers?"I was curious what books have influenced your creative or design processes. Two of my professors have stressed the importance of curating a design library and gave several suggestions on getting started...I was hoping to hear what others in the industry enjoy reading on design, or any other topic. I've got a few on minimalism and sustainability I'm hoping to read as well, and I'd love to hear your recommendations and discuss your thoughts!"(Editor's Note: maehoosadie also includes a great list below her question of must-read design books worth checking out!)Here are a few responses to this reader's question straight from our audience—Aircraft by Le Corbusier"It is a funky short book, presumable about aircraft but really about how he saw technology could reshape culture. It can be read in about 30 minutes." — yo The Best Interface is No Interface by Golden Krishna"This book was recommended by a friend, and we both work in the furniture industry. Although the book talks a lot about the digital world, its been incredibly inspiring and changed the way I think about interfacing with products." — AVClub"Currently reading Designing Design by Kenya Hara which has some interesting perspectives. I also like:Super Normal by Naoto Fukasawa & Jasper MorrisonOkala Practitioner by iDSAThe Innovator's Dilemma by Clayton Christiansen"—Brian_Donlin"I could also recommend a couple books from IDEO's Tom Kelley:The Art of Innovation and The Ten Faces of Innovation." — Architorture____________________________________So tell us—what's missing from this list? Share your must-reads with the Core77 audience in the comment feed below or in the original discussion board thread! [...]



Reader Submitted: This Wearable Speaker Concept Looks Like a Necklace but Acts Like a Surround Sound System

SSME Necho 5.1 is a surround sound system that is worn around the neck.The idea for the Necho came to me when I absolutely had to have a surround sound system in my computer room. I realized I would have had to undergo a massive project just to add speakers to the room. There had to be an easier way to achieve the sound quality I was looking for.

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View the full project here(image)