Subscribe: This Day in History
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/_/WoD/rss.aspx?type=history
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
anchorage  competition  day history  day  earthquake  history  outbreak  people  recorded  regatta  rowing  thousands  tornadoes  town  world 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: This Day in History

This Day in History



This Day in History is a free service of TheFreeDictionary.com



Last Build Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Copyright: Farlex, Inc.
 



The Palm Sunday Tornado Outbreak (1920)

Tue, 28 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) In 1920, meteorologists did not have modern forecasting equipment, and there was no storm warning system in place in the US. Thus, when an outbreak of storms began near dawn on March 28, 1920, few were prepared for the devastation that followed. Some 400 people were killed and more than 1,200 injured that day by at least 38 recorded tornadoes in the deep South and the Midwest. Why is it likely that both the total number of tornadoes as well as the actual death toll were underreported? Discuss



Good Friday Earthquake near Anchorage, Alaska (1964)

Mon, 27 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) With a magnitude of 9.2, the earthquake that struck east of Anchorage at rush hour on Good Friday 1964 was one of the strongest ever recorded. About 130 people died, most in the subsequent tsunami, and much of downtown Anchorage was destroyed. The quake's effects were felt around the world—boats were sunk as far away as the Gulf of Mexico. Within a day, 11 aftershocks measuring 6.0 or higher were reported. In the months after, residents endured thousands of smaller ones. How long did they last?



The Henley Regatta Is Established in England (1839)

Sun, 26 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) Until 1839, the little town of Henley-on-Thames was known primarily as a glass-producing port town. During a town hall meeting that year, Captain Edmund Gardiner proposed holding a regatta, since the growing popularity of rowing could benefit the town. Today, the rowing competition is a world-class competition that draws oarsmen from around the world for five days each summer, with thousands of spectators taking part in its traditions. How did it officially become a "royal" regatta in 1851?