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Preview: DxO related news: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

dxo related articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)



dxo related articles from Digital Photography Review



Last Build Date: Tue, 26 Dec 2017 19:14:00 Z

Copyright: Copyright (c) 1998-2018 Digital Photograph Review
 



Confirmed: DxO says new Nik Collection to be released in 2018

Tue, 26 Dec 2017 19:14:00 Z

(image)

Great news for fans of the Nik Collection of photo editing plugins: two months after DxO acquired the collection from Google, the company has publicly announced plans to release a brand new version of the Nik Collection in 2018.

The statement went out over Google Plus (go figure), where the DxO team welcomed the Nik community into the fold with the following announcement (emphasis added):

Dear Nik Collection users,

We at DxO are very pleased to welcome the Nik community! We wish you a very happy holiday season and a healthy and prosperous New Year: may you be inspired to take spectacular photos in 2018!

Like you, we are passionate about photography and image quality. That’s why we view this opportunity with Nik as a commitment to ensure that you — that all of us who enjoy taking photos — are guaranteed to have the very best solutions at our disposal.

You’ll be happy to know that our developers are enthusiastically working on a new version of the Nik Collection to be released in 2018!

The statement then goes on to entice Nik users to download DxO PhotoLab (formerly DxO OpticsPro), where they can once again take advantage of Nik's 'U Point technology' to edit their RAW and JPEG files.

Of course, none of this should be new information for dedicated DPReview users. We already knew that U Point was coming to DxO's own photo software, and DxO founder/CEO Jerome Meniere told us the company planned to develop a new "Nik Collection 2018" for mid-next year, but last week's public announcement that development is under way has photographers online buzzing this week.

Now, if only they'd tell us when exactly the new version will come one... and how much it will cost.




DxO acquires Nik Collection from Google and will continue to offer it for free... for now

Wed, 25 Oct 2017 13:00:00 Z

Look alive, Nik Collection fans: the software suite is back from the (mostly) dead. It will change hands from Google to DxO, who will continue to offer it as Photoshop and Lightroom plug-ins, as well as incorporate it into their own software. DxO will offer a new flagship application called PhotoLab, a version of OpticsPro that will incorporate Nik Collection's U Point technology. We spoke with Aravind Krishnaswamy, a Google Engineering Director, and DxO founder/CEO Jerome Meniere about the acquisition. Krishnaswamy mentioned Google's need to focus on its Photos application, but that they want the Nik community to have a future, and a place to continue using the suite's tools. That's where DxO picks things up. The Nik Collection in its present state will continue to be offered for free – for now. Meniere hints that this may not always be the case, and DxO plans to develop a new "Nik Collection 2018" for mid-next year. Meniere also mentions that they'd like to work with the Nik community to take the software in a direction that they'd like to see it go. Not surprisingly, Nik-developed Snapseed is not included in the transaction, and will remain with Google. The company plans to continue actively developing and improving the mobile image editing app. Head to DxO's dedicated Nik Collection site if you'd like to snag free versions of the plug-ins while you still can. Press release DxO acquires Nik Collection assets from Google and plans to set a new bar on Photo editing softwares PARIS – October 25, 2017 – DxO, one of the most innovative companies in consumer imaging, today announced the acquisition of the Nik Collection assets from Google. DxO plans to continue development of the Nik Collection. The current version will remain available for free on DxO’s dedicated website, while a new “Nik Collection 2018 Edition” is planned for mid-next year. “The Nik Collection gives photographers tools to create photos they absolutely love,” said Aravind Krishnaswamy, an Engineering Director with Google. “We’re thrilled to have DxO, a company dedicated to high-quality photography solutions, acquire and continue to develop it.” “We are very excited to welcome the Nik Collection to the DxO family,” said Jérôme Ménière, CEO and founder of DxO. “DxO revolutionized the image processing market many times over the years with its innovative solutions, and we are convinced that we will continue to do so with Nik’s tools, which offer new creative opportunities for photographers. The latest version of our flagship software DxO PhotoLab, which is available as of now, is the first embodiment of this thrilling acquisition with built-in U point Technology.” About the Nik Collection The Nik Collection is composed of seven desktop plugins for Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop that provide a powerful range of photo editing capabilities — from filter applications that improve color correction, to retouching and creative effects, to image sharpening that brings out hidden details, to the ability to adjust the color and tonality of images. The current lineup of the Nik Collection includes: Analog Efex Pro: Applies film-era camera, lens, and film simulations to digital images Color Efex Pro: A comprehensive set of filters for color correction, retouching, and creative effects Dfine: Noise reduction software for camera-specific digital images HDR Efex Pro: Specialized program for processing HDR pictures Sharpener Pro: Image sharpening for digital images Silver Efex Pro: Black & White conversion of images with darkroom-inspired controls Viveza: Selectively adjusts image color and tonality without complicated masks or selections [...]






DxO ViewPoint 3 adds automatic distortion correction

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 08:30:00 Z

A new 'miniature' tool allows for application of a tilt-shift type effect. DxO ViewPoint 3 is available today, adding automatic horizon and distortion correction to DxO's wide-angle lens correction software. The existing manual distortion correction tools are now complemented by an all-auto option to correct geometric distortion while automatically cropping the image. A new 'miniature' look is also added, providing a tilt-shift effect that can be adjusted by the user – you can adjust the direction of the blur gradients, and even modify the look of the bokeh by specifying the shape of the 'virtual iris'.  DxO ViewPoint 3 is available now for Mac and Windows. Through December 4 it's offered for $50/£39, a discount off the usual $79/£59 price. Press release DxO announces DxO ViewPoint 3, a major update to its industry-leading wide-angle lens correction software New automatic perspective and horizon correction tools are complemented by a miniature effect that perfectly mimics tilt shift lenses Special discounts on all DxO software through December 4, 2016 PARIS—November 16, 2016—DxO, a world leader in digital imaging technologies, announces a major update to DxO ViewPoint, its simple but powerful software that automatically corrects problems inherent in photographs taken with wide-angle lenses. DxO ViewPoint 3 leverages DxO’s advanced image science to automatically correct skewed perspectives and horizons with a single click, making the process quick and easy. The update also introduces a brand new tool that produces a remarkable miniature effect, the first software of its kind to perfectly replicate the popular look made famous by tilt shift lenses. DxO ViewPoint is simple, but powerful image processing software for Mac and Windows that thousands of photographers rely on for photos taken with their wide-angle lenses because of its ability to fix even the most complex perspective problems, as well as restore the natural shape to subjects situated on the edges of photos. DxO ViewPoint benefits from the automatic corrections provided by DxO Optics Modules, developed by exacting laboratory analysis of thousands of camera and lens combinations. The existing perspective correction tools have been dramatically enhanced with an innovative, fully automatic mode that can instantly correct geometric distortion, straighten both horizontal and vertical lines, and automatically crop images, effectively eliminating keystoning while preserving the maximum information in the picture. The new auto horizon correction tool is equally efficient at correcting skewed landscape and architectural images. A single click detects the most relevant straight lines in the image, which are analyzed to determine the correct horizon. “DxO ViewPoint has become an essential tool for me when photographing with my wide-angle lenses, which by their very nature induce all manner of odd deformations,” said architectural photographer, Luca Nicolao. “Its tools let me easily correct for distortions and keystoning, allowing me to achieve a much more natural composition in my images.” DxO ViewPoint 3 also adds an innovative and useful new tool that perfectly simulates the depth-of-field reduction that’s identical to the type of creative looks that previously required the purchase of costly and tricky tilt shift lenses. To replicate the miniature look, DxO ViewPoint 3 displays the location and intensity of two blur gradients which the user can adjust symmetrically or asymmetrically. The application even enables photographers to simulate a precise type of bokeh. With just one license, DxO ViewPoint works as both a stand-alone app, and as a plug-in for DxO OpticsPro, Adobe Lightroom, Photoshop and Photoshop Elements. DxO ViewPoint 3 can be used as a plugin for DxO OpticsPro starting with version 11.3 (also available). Pricing & Availability DxO ViewPoint 3 for Mac and Windows is immediately available in the DxO online store (shop.[...]



DxO ONE adds Raw image workflow for iOS

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 22:11:00 Z

DxO announced that it has added a full Raw processing workflow to its iPhone-connected DxO ONE camera. Taking advantage of Raw image support in iOS 10, the update provides one-touch transfer of DxO ONE Raw files to the iOS photo library, from which images can be processed or shared. Additionally, the company has introduced new Raw files that save an average of 30% space, improved responsiveness and boot time, faster application startup, full remote control of the camera using a direct Wi-Fi connection and a smart lighting feature to enhance dynamic range in difficult lighting situations. A free update to the DxO ONE iOS app (v2.1) will be available in November, however the company did not provide a specific date. Update: the app is now available in the App Store. Press release: DxO ONE 2.1 update integrates full RAW processing workflow in an iPhone environment DxO ONE update makes mobile an option for demanding photographers PARIS—November 10, 2016—DxO, pioneer in digital imaging technologies, announces a major update to its award-winning DxO ONE miniaturized camera that lets demanding photographers take their mobile image making to the next level. Less than three months after the release of a 2.0 update that brought Wi-Fi as a new feature, DxO continues to extend the use of its pro-quality camera by introducing the world’s first seamless RAW workflow, direct from the DxO ONE to your iPhone or iPad. The version 2.1 update takes full advantage of RAW support in iOS 10, enabling a one-touch transfer of DxO ONE RAW files to the iOS Photos library where they can be processed on-the-go. Available to all DxO ONE users free of charge, the update also enables direct Wi-Fi remote control, and adds other performance boosting enhancements. The DxO ONE camera revolutionized mobile photography by being the first to combine a large, high- resolution sensor and fast, razor-sharp lens in a miniaturized design that pairs directly with the iPhone or iPad. From the start, the DxO ONE has allowed photographers to store images in the RAW file format, which offers superior quality over JPEGs and considerable flexibility. Until now, post processing of RAW images necessitated they first be imported to a desktop computer. With this latest update, the DxO ONE camera can seamlessly transfer RAW photos direct to the iPhone where they can be further enhanced by Google Snapseed, Adobe Lightroom Mobile, and other popular iOS photo editing applications that have embraced support for mobile RAW image processing. “I prefer to capture in RAW, because it gives me enhanced dynamic range, which is especially useful in bringing back details in blown highlights and deep shadows,” said professional photographer Camilla Ferrari. “Thanks to new developments by Apple and DxO, I’m now able to transfer RAW images from my DxO ONE camera right to my iPhone with a single tap, where I can process them in Adobe Lightroom Mobile and other iOS apps while I’m still on location. Welcome to the future!” To further streamline the new mobile RAW workflow, DxO has introduced a lighter and faster recording speed for RAW files, which squeezes an average of 30% more storage space out of existing microSD cards. Overall responsiveness has also been improved, with a faster boot time for the camera, quicker application start-up, and improvements to the loading speed of the photo gallery. The update also adds a number of other enhancements to the user experience, including a direct Wi- Fi connection that provides full remote control over the DxO ONE camera even when no existing Wi- Fi network is available. Version 2 also added a host of innovative features further extending the many uses for the DxO ONE, including the ability to tap into the Wi-Fi network that your iPhone is already logged into for remote control in-home or in-office, and a Mobile Smart Lighting feature designed to dramatically enhance the dynamic range of photos taken in tricky light[...]



DxO releases major firmware update and accessories for DxO One camera

Wed, 31 Aug 2016 19:01:00 Z

DxO has released a significant firmware update and an expanded range of accessories for its DxO One camera. The improvements include remote operation over Wi-Fi, while the accessories include a waterproof case. The firmware update finally enables the camera's Wi-Fi, making it possible to use it remotely. The camera can either create and ad hoc connection to an iOS device or can join an existing Wi-Fi network. The Wi-Fi system uses the Apple Lightning connector to establish the communication between the two devices. These ad hoc connections should have a range of 10-15m, depending on how much radio traffic there is. Connections across existing Wi-Fi networks work over a greater range but use a slower transfer protocol. The firmware update also improves both the camera's battery management and the battery level reporting, meaning you should be able to shoot for longer with the camera and have a clearer idea of how much battery life remains. Accessories DxO has also launched a series of accessories that considerably extend the One's capabilities. These include a footplate/tripod mount, that allows the camera to sit upright and includes both a standard tripod thread and Arca-Swiss-style flanges. These are closer together than usual, though, so it may not be compatible with all Arca-Swiss heads. There's also a rugged case. This comes with two clip-on backs, one of which provides environmental sealing and allows the continued use of the touchscreen and a second that provides full water proofing (to a depth of 45m). The case includes a hinge attachment, making it compatible with many mounts and accessories designed for GoPros. With the waterproof back attached, the camera's shooting mode can be changed by holding your hand over the lens for 3 seconds - allowing a degree of control without having to remove the camera from its case. There's also a set of adapters to allow 30.5mm filters to be clipped onto the front of the camera. This makes it possible to add diopter lenses or optical filters to the camera easily. The firmware update and associated iOS app will be free. The tripod stand will cost around $24.99/£19.99/€24,90, while the 'outdoor case' has a recommended price of $59.99/£49.99/€59,90. Press Release The DxO ONE award winning camera takes it one step further with two new state-of-the-art features Wi-Fi Remote Control and Outdoor Shell dramatically extend the fields of use of the DxO ONE camera. PARIS and SAN FRANCISCO—August 31, 2016—Camera manufacturer DxO announces major updates to the DxO ONE Miniaturized DSLR-quality Camera for iPhone, including Wi-Fi remote control and a new waterproof Outdoor Shell designed to further extend its elds of use. Upholding their promise to make the camera even better after you’ve bought it, Wi-Fi Remote Control will be available to all existing users free of charge via a forthcoming 2.0 software update. DxO’s accessories ecosystem also introduces an ultra-compact Stand and a snap-on Optical Adapter, enhancing creative possibilities for the DxO ONE which captures pro-quality photos and videos that you can share instantly to Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and more. DxO’s new Wi-Fi Remote Control implementation is remarkable in that it completely eliminates the cumbersome and altogether frustrating Wi-Fi con guration process that plagues every other Wi-Fi-equipped camera on the market. When attached via DxO’s patented Lightning connector, Apple iOS can seamlessly pass its Wi-Fi authentication credentials from the iPhone to the DxO ONE. In-house or in-of ce, users can take advantage of this unique DxO innovation that lets the camera immediately tap into the Wi-Fi network that your iPhone is already logged onto. And when traveling about, or out in the wilderness, your DxO ONE can just as easily create a direct Wi-Fi connection to your iPhone. By enabling remote connectivity between the DxO ONE camera and your iPhone, photographers [...]



Firmware update adds watermarking and improves user interface of DxO ONE

Wed, 08 Jun 2016 13:00:00 Z

DxO has released a firmware update for its ONE connected camera. The main additions in firmware version 1.4 are support for copyright/author metadata as well as watermarking. Users can now preview aperture and exposure compensation settings in real-time on the 'viewfinder,' better known as an iPhone or iPad. DxO has also tweaked the user interface, with quicker access to camera and app settings. And, as with most firmware updates, overall camera performance has been improved. Version 1.4 of the DxO ONE app for iOS is now available in the iTunes Store. The camera firmware is updated via the app. Press Release: DxO ONE continues to redefine mobile photography with v1.4 update A new streamlined user interface helps protect your photos with integrated copyright and watermarking support PARIS—June 8th, 2016—DxO announced today the immediate availability of another major update to the multi-award-winning DxO ONE Miniaturized Pro Quality Camera™ for iPhone® and iPad®. Continuing with the promise to make the DxO ONE even better after you’ve bought it, version 1.4 adds integrated copyright/author and watermarking support to help protect your photos from unauthorized use. In addition to important performance enhancements, the update also features a dramatically improved user experience that puts all of your capture and application settings in their own, quick-access menus. “Like my DSLR and tripod, the DxO ONE has become an important part of my workflow, allowing me to instantly share high quality, high res photos with my clients and followers”, said noted motorsports photographer, John Thawley. “By adding integrated copyright info and watermarking support, I can be confident that my shared DxO ONE images are now protected from unauthorized use.”  Since its initial introduction revolutionized the world of mobile photography, literally dozens and dozens of new features have been added to every DxO ONE via automatic (and free) software and firmware updates. Photographers the world over told our team they love the instant sharing capabilities of the DxO ONE, but wanted a way to better protect their work. DxO’s engineers responded by providing the ability to automatically embed copyright and author info directly into the EXIF data of every DxO ONE photo. In addition, version 1.4 introduces the option to automatically add a watermark to photos shared to Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and every other photo sharing service supported by Apple iOS. As more and more sophisticated controls have been added to the DxO ONE iOS app, the design team in Paris determined through exhaustive usability studies, that access to these controls could be even more efficient. The resulting version 1.4 update sports a streamlined user interface that provides one-tap access to capture settings, all of which are now logically grouped in a consolidated design. In addition, application settings, such as the Message Center and online support, can now be accessed with one tap from the Gallery view. The net result is that the bright, beautiful Retina viewfinder of the iPhone is now far less cluttered, leaving more room to compose your DxO ONE images. “DxO has a world-class design team in Paris that values direct user feedback above everything else,” said Kirk Paulsen, consulting CMO for DxO. “They continue to innovative at a breakneck pace, adding exciting new features and useful controls with each successive release. It’s remarkable how far the DxO ONE has advanced in less than a year since it was first introduced.” Version 1.4 also introduces a host of other features based on direct user feedback, including the ability to preview in the viewfinder, in real-time, camera controls such as Aperture and EV-bias. Users can now determine when they want their DxO ONE to go into power saving mode, and all-important firmware updates that unlock new features and functional[...]



DxO OpticsPro 11 brings advanced Raw noise reduction

Wed, 01 Jun 2016 16:47:00 Z

DxO has updated its OpticsPro software to version 11. OpticsPro 11 brings improvements to one of the last generation's headline features - 'PRIME' noise reduction. DxO promises that PRIME 2016 offers improved bokeh protection and better detail retention, particularly in shadows. Processing times have decreased, and users can expect up to 4X faster performance. A new spot-weighted option is now offered under 'DxO Smart Lighting', limiting the effects of 'Smart Lighting' tone-mapping to local areas of the image (that you can define). This helps preserve overall contrast, particularly in detected faces. DxO demoed the feature for us, and it really helped curb the flattening effect of too high a 'Smart Lighting' setting.   The hallmark of DxO OpticsPro is the profile-based automatic corrections the software performs simply reading the metadata of your Raws. On top of that, smart algorithms like 'Smart Lighting' really help get you a good starting point, while remaining customizable in their effect. Do you rely on DxO OpticsPro for your images and, if so, what's your favorite aspect of the software? Let us know in the comments below the Press Release. Press Release: DxO OpticsPro 11 introduces new innovations in advanced RAW image processing DxO PRIME 2016 noise reduction technology and automated spot weighted corrections are indispensable tools for photographers Special discounts on all DxO software through June 30, 2016 PARIS & SAN FRANCISCO—June 1, 2016—DxO, a world leader in digital imaging technologies, announces the immediate availability of DxO OpticsPro 11, a major update to its award-winning photo software for Mac and PC. DxO OpticsPro 11 introduces important enhancements to DxO PRIME, the industry-standard for noise reduction, and new automated tools, such as spot weighted correction, auto microcontrast and auto red-eye that leverage face detection to help bring out the subtle nuances in images — all in just a few clicks and regardless of the original shooting conditions. DxO PRIME 2016, better and faster DxO OpticsPro 11 features DxO’s proprietary DxO PRIME 2016 noise reduction, which enables photographers to salvage noisy photos thought previously unusable. With DxO OpticsPro 11, photographers can capture new images at an even higher ISO by using a new version of PRIME that is better and faster than ever. DxO PRIME 2016 better preserves bokehs and smooth transitions, retains more details, and more faithfully preserves colors in dark areas, and it does this all automatically by reading each camera’s precise calibration data. And through an intense effort to adapt and optimize this technology, DxO PRIME 2016 is now able to process RAW files up to 4x faster than before — in fact, the higher the ISO, the bigger the benefit of processing time. “The new DxO PRIME noise reduction is nothing short of amazing,” said professional photographer Mike Mezeul, “it gives me the ability to capture images at incredibly high ISOs and still render out incredibly rich, detailed, and noise-free images.” Automated Spot Weighted Corrections The image scientists at DxO have designed a new enhancement to DxO OpticsPro’s Smart Lighting tool that uses face detection to apply an intelligent tone map on the entire image, to better extend the dynamic range, add fill light, and improve contrast while optimizing illumination on faces. The result is genuine spot processing—after capture—with the very same results as spot metering typically provides in camera, but with the added benefit of fine-tuning flexibility. “The image scientists at DxO have done it again,” said Camilla Ferrari, professional photographer and DxO ambassador, “by using face detection, the new spot weighted correction is able to apply even a very strong level of Smart Lighting, while keeping the people in m[...]



DxOMark Mobile Report: Lenovo Moto G Plus

Tue, 17 May 2016 16:56:00 Z

DxOMark Mobile Report: Lenovo Moto G Plus DxOMark Mobile Motorola G Plus Mobile review Summary The Moto G Plus is the newest arrival in the Moto G series of mid-range smartphones. With a 1/2.4-inch Omnivsion OV16860 16MP sensor with a large pixel size of 1.34um, F2.0 aperture, on-sensor phase detection and laser-assisted AF the camera specification would look right at home on a high-end device. You can read our first impressions review of the Moto G Plus here. In its DxOMark test the Moto G Plus scores 84 points, which puts it on the same level as current flagship phones, such as the Apple iPhone 6s Plus, Google Nexus 6P or Motorola/Lenovo's own Droid Turbo 2/Moto X Force. When shooting still images the testers liked the "very good detail preservation" in bright light, the "fast and accurate autofocus" and "good noise reduction in outdoor conditions". They also noted the colors, which are "vivid and pleasant" in daylight and the good white balance in low and artificial light. On the downside, outdoor images show "some loss of detail in the shadow areas", a "slightly bluish cast is sometimes visible in outdoor scenes" and "some irregularities in HDR activation and white balance are visible". Some outdoor images also showed a "cyan shift close to sky saturation". In video mode the DxOMark team liked the "good stabilization both in bright light and indoor conditions, good color rendering and white balance, fast autofocus convergence and good noise reduction in outdoor conditions". However, they also found that "from macro to infinity, some steps during the autofocus convergence are visible" and saw "occasional autofocus inaccuracies in low light". "In low light some detail is lost and luminance noise is visible" and there are "visible steps in exposure adaptation". Still Photography Color, Exposure and Contrast The DxOMark team found the Lenovo Moto G Plus images to show "vivid and pleasant color", with good white balance and without any color shading. Target exposure is generally good. However, in difficult light situations highlights are occasionally clipped, "some irregularities in HDR activation are visible" and a "slightly bluish cast" sometimes appears in daylight images. In low light "very slight color shading is visible." Overall DxOMark awarded the Lenovo Moto G Plus scores of: 4.4 out of 5 for Exposure 4.5 out of 5 for White Balance accuracy 3.9 out of 5 for Color shading in low light* 4.5 out of 5 for Color shading in bright light* 3.0 out of 5 for Color Rendering in low light 4.5 out of 5 for Color Rendering in bright light *Color Shading is the nasty habit cellphone cameras have of rendering different areas of the frame with different color shifts, resulting in pictures with, for example, pinkish centers and greenish corners. Noise and Details DxOMark's engineers reported that the Lenovo Moto G Plus images show "very good detail and good noise reduction in outdoor conditions". However, there is also "some luminance noise and some loss of detail in low light". Texture Acutance Texture acutance is a way of measuring the ability of a camera to capture images that preserve fine details, particularly the kind of low contrast detail (such as fine foliage, hair or fur) that can be blurred away by noise reduction or obliterated by excessive sharpening. Sharpness is an important part of the quality of an image, but while it's easy to look at an image and decide visually whether it's sharp or not, the objective measurement of sharpness is less straightforward. An image can be defined as 'sharp' if edges are sharp and if fine details are visible. In-camera processing means that it's possible to have one of these (sharp edges) but not the other (fine [...]



DxOMark Mobile report: Nextbit Robin

Thu, 21 Apr 2016 22:17:51 Z

DxOMark Mobile Report: Nextbit Robin Summary The Nextbit Robin doesn't look much different than most other smartphones, but its Android operating system and hardware have been optimized to make it the first real cloud phone. When the device is connected to Wi-Fi and plugged into the charger it automatically backs up apps and photos to the cloud. When you start running out of local storage space on the device, files and apps you haven't used in a while are automatically archived. In the camera department the Robin comes with a 13MP sensor, phase detection AF, an F2.2 lens, dual-tone LED flash and 4K video support. You can read more about the Nextbit automatic archiving process and how we got on with its camera in our real-life test in the Nextbit Robin quick review. In its DxOMark test the Nextbit Robin scores 81 points, currently taking the18th position in the DxOMark Mobile ranking. In still image mode the testers liked the "good detail preservation and fast and generally accurate autofocus". On the downside, "noise is very visible in all conditions", chroma noise levels are high, "white balance is sometimes inaccurate in outdoor conditions, mostly with a blue cast" and high-contrast scenes show little shadow detail and some highlight clipping. The test team also criticized  "fringing and demosaicing artifacts and visible ringing". When shooting video the Robin showed "good autofocus behavior, generally good noise reduction in bright light and good stabilization in bright light conditions". However, testers also found a "loss of detail in low light, and occasional oscillations with exposure adaptation." Some clips also showed "tremors and jitter artifacts". Still Photography Color, Exposure and Contrast The DxOMark team found the Nextbit Robin images to be "mostly well exposed" but also criticized "visible color shading in all conditions, sometimes inaccurate white balance in outdoor conditions" and highlight and shadow clipping in high-contrast scenes.  Overall DxOMark awarded the Nextbit Robin scores of: 4.4 out of 5 for Exposure 4.1 out of 5 for White Balance accuracy 3.1 out of 5 for Color shading in low light* 4.2 out of 5 for Color shading in bright light* 3.0 out of 5 for Color Rendering in low light 4.5 out of 5 for Color Rendering in bright light *Color Shading is the nasty habit cellphone cameras have of rendering different areas of the frame with different color shifts, resulting in pictures with, for example, pinkish centers and greenish corners. Noise and Details DxOMark's engineers reported that the Nextbit Robin images show well preserved detail in all conditions and that "low light noise has a fine grain". On the downside, "outdoor noise has a large grain, chromatic noise is very visible and luminance noise very noticeable in low light". Texture Acutance Texture acutance is a way of measuring the ability of a camera to capture images that preserve fine details, particularly the kind of low contrast detail (such as fine foliage, hair or fur) that can be blurred away by noise reduction or obliterated by excessive sharpening. Sharpness is an important part of the quality of an image, but while it's easy to look at an image and decide visually whether it's sharp or not, the objective measurement of sharpness is less straightforward. An image can be defined as 'sharp' if edges are sharp and if fine details are visible. In-camera processing means that it's possible to have one of these (sharp edges) but not the other (fine details). Conventional MTF measurements tell us how sharp an edge is, but have drawbacks when it comes to measuring fine detail preservation. Image processing alg[...]



DxOMark Mobile report: HTC 10

Thu, 14 Apr 2016 19:57:00 Z

DxOMark Mobile Report: HTC 10 Summary Announced earlier this week, the HTC 10 is the Taiwanese manufacturer's latest flagship model and comes with a top-end camera specification. A 1/2.3-inch 12MP sensor is combined with a fast F1.8 aperture and optical image stabilization. The AF is laser-assisted and the HTC 10 is also the first smartphone to come with optical image stabilization in the front camera.  In the DxOMark test the HTC 10 performs very well and with a DxOMark Mobile score of 88 takes the joint number one spot, next to the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge. In still image mode the testers liked the "very good detail preservation, fast and accurate autofocus, good exposure and good noise reduction in low light conditions". They also found the white balance and color rendering to be generally good. On the downside, there is a "visible loss of sharpness in the corners, some luminance noise in the sky and visible vignetting and noise in the corners when shooting with flash". In some pictures the testers also found slight highlight clipping. When shooting video the test engineers were impressed by the "good stabilization, good exposure, good white balance and color rendering and accurate and fast autofocus". However, they also noted "some residual motion in walking movements, luminance noise in low light conditions and occasional focus failures while panning".  Still Photography Color, Exposure and Contrast The DxOMark team found the HTC 10 images to show "good exposure, good white balance in indoor conditions and neutral white balance and accurate color rendering in outdoor conditions". However, they also criticized "slightly blown highlights in some outdoor images and occasional white balance irregularities." Overall DxOMark awarded the HTC 10 scores of: 4.6 out of 5 for Exposure 4.5 out of 5 for White Balance accuracy 4.3 out of 5 for Color shading in low light* 4.5 out of 5 for Color shading in bright light* 3.0 out of 5 for Color Rendering in low light 4.5 out of 5 for Color Rendering in bright light *Color Shading is the nasty habit cellphone cameras have of rendering different areas of the frame with different color shifts, resulting in pictures with, for example, pinkish centers and greenish corners. Noise and Details DxOMark's engineers reported that the HTC 10 images show "very good detail preservation in all conditions and good noise reduction in low light". On the downside "some luminance noise is visible in the sky". Texture Acutance Texture acutance is a way of measuring the ability of a camera to capture images that preserve fine details, particularly the kind of low contrast detail (such as fine foliage, hair or fur) that can be blurred away by noise reduction or obliterated by excessive sharpening. Sharpness is an important part of the quality of an image, but while it's easy to look at an image and decide visually whether it's sharp or not, the objective measurement of sharpness is less straightforward. An image can be defined as 'sharp' if edges are sharp and if fine details are visible. In-camera processing means that it's possible to have one of these (sharp edges) but not the other (fine details). Conventional MTF measurements tell us how sharp an edge is, but have drawbacks when it comes to measuring fine detail preservation. Image processing algorithms can detect edges and enhance their sharpness, but they can also find homogeneous areas and smooth them out to reduce noise. Texture acutance, on the other hand, can qualify sharpness in terms of preservation of fine details, without being fooled by edge enhancement algorithms. A dead leaf pattern is d[...]



DxOMark Mobile report: Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 19:13:00 Z

DxOMark Mobile Report: Samsung Galaxy S7 edge Summary The Samsung Galaxy S7 edge is the successor to last year's Galaxy S6 edge and shares its camera specification with the slightly smaller Galaxy S7. In the camera department pixel count has been reduced from 16 to 12MP compared to the S6 edge. This results in larger 1.4um pixels or a 56 percent increase in pixel size in relation to the predecessor. Samsung has also introduced a Dual-Pixel AF-system which splits every single pixel on the sensor into two photodiodes for on-chip phase detection. Light is captured through an F1.7 aperture and an optical image stabilization system keeps things steady at slow shutter speeds and when shooting video. In the DxOMark test the new camera specification performs very well and with a DxOMark Mobile score of 88 the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge is the new leader in the DxOMark smartphone rankings, relegating the Galaxy S6 edge plus and the Sony Xperia Z5 to a joint number 2 spot. In still image mode the testers liked "Good detail preservation in low light and fine detail in outdoor conditions, good exposure and dynamic range in all light conditions, low noise levels" and a "fast and accurate autofocus". When shooting with flash the DxOMark team found the images to show "very good detail preservation and accurate white balance and color preservation". On the downside, "under tungsten light, a yellow cast is visible, in very high-contrast scenes some image areas are clipped and ringing is visible". When shooting video the test engineers were impressed by the "very good autofocus behavior, with good tracking capabilities and, fast and smooth convergence in all conditions". They also noted the "very good stabilization, good detail preservation in bright light, good overall exposure and color rendering and low noise levels, even in low light". Negative points included a "jitter artifact and loss of detail in low light". Slight color casts were also noticeable, particularly in low light. Still Photography Color, Exposure and Contrast The DxOMark team found the Galaxy S7 edge images to show "good exposure and dynamic range and vivid and pleasant color in all conditions". White balance is accurate at all times as well. On the downside, "a yellow cast is visible under tungsten illuminants and color shading is slightly visible". In high-contrast scenes some highlight-clipping can occur. Overall the testers found the colors to be more saturated than on previous Samsung devices.  Overall DxOMark awarded the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge scores of: 4.6 out of 5 for Exposure 4.5 out of 5 for White Balance accuracy 4.3 out of 5 for Color shading in low light* 4.5 out of 5 for Color shading in bright light* 3.0 out of 5 for Color Rendering in low light 4.5 out of 5 for Color Rendering in bright light *Color Shading is the nasty habit cellphone cameras have of rendering different areas of the frame with different color shifts, resulting in pictures with, for example, pinkish centers and greenish corners. Noise and Details DxOMark's engineers reported that the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge images show "good detail preservation in low light, low noise levels in all conditions" and good fine detail preservation in bright light. However, "very fine detail is lost in all conditions". Texture Acutance Texture acutance is a way of measuring the ability of a camera to capture images that preserve fine details, particularly the kind of low contrast detail (such as fine foliage, hair or fur) that can be blurred away by noise reduction or obliterated by excessive sharpening. Sharpness is an important part of the quality of an image, but whi[...]



DxO extends camera support with OpticsPro, FilmPack and ViewPoint updates

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 18:25:00 Z

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Update: Prices have been updated in this story to reflect corrections issued by DxO.

Original story: DxO has introduced updates for its OpticsPro, FilmPack and ViewPoint software that adds support for six new cameras, as well as 50 additional camera/lens modules to the DxO Optics Module library.

The updates add support for the following cameras:

  • Canon Powershot G5 X
  • Canon Powershot G9 X
  • Leica Q (typ 116)
  • Sony DSC-RX1R II
  • Canon EOS M10
  • Leica SL

DxO OpticsPro v10.5.4, DxO FilmPack v5.5.4 and DxO ViewPoint v2.5.13 are available for download now from DxO. Through March 31, new users can purchase DxO's applications at a discount:

  • DxO OpticsPro 10 ESSENTIAL Edition: $99/£79 (instead of $129/£99)
  • DxO OpticsPro 10 ELITE Edition: $149/£119 (instead of $199/£159)
  • DxO FilmPack 5 ESSENTIAL Edition: $49/£39 (instead of $79/£59)
  • DxO FilmPack 5 ELITE Edition: $99/£79 (instead of $129/£99)
  • DxO ViewPoint 2: $49/£39 (instead of $79/£59)



DxO ONE update enables framing assist via the camera's OLED monitor

Thu, 10 Mar 2016 20:20:00 Z

A recent update for the DxO ONE has introduced framing assistance via the camera's built-in OLED when the device is used in standalone shooting mode. A monochrome live image preview is displayed on the camera's small, rear screen to improve the experience of using the camera without connection to an iPhone. The camera is also offered at a lower $499 price point, without software bundled.  Firmware 1.3 also introduces a motion blur alert feature, as well as a modified interface for selecting white balance, metering and focus mode. When sharing photos, you'll now see a visual confirmation of a successful upload, and JPEG compression level can be specified.  The app update is available now for free through the App Store, and camera firmware can be updated through the camera itself. The DxO ONE is available now for $499. Press release: DxO ONE now features a dramatically enhanced stand-alone experience DxO unbundles desktop software to make the camera available at a new low price of just $499 Press release: PARIS, March 2, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- DxO announced today the immediate availability of yet another ground-breaking update to the award-winning DxO ONE professional quality connected camera for iPhone® and iPad®. The version 1.3 update, available for free via the iTunes App Store, introduces several new features that further extend the use of the DxO ONE, including the ability to use the OLED display as a novel framing assistant to help quickly compose while operating the camera with one hand. Additionally, DxO has unbundled their desktop software from the package (DxO FilmPack and DxO OpticsPro now sold separately), enabling even more photographers to get their hands on the revolutionary DxO ONE camera at a new low price of just $499. "That is one trippy amazing viewfinder — love it!" said award-winning photographer, John Stanmeyer. "Even more wonderful, in very low light, the ONE handled all the complexities of ISO, focus, etc., instantly. Amazing. Perfectly fine for those rapid moments when you want to make an image, a RAW high res file, in any lighting conditions we're placed in." Version 1.3, the second major upgrade to date, enables the DxO ONE to be used as a miniaturized pro-quality camera that is smaller, easier, and faster to shoot than any other camera on the market. To quickly capture life's fleeting moments, simply pull the DxO ONE out of your pocket or purse, and in one movement, slide the lens cover open, compose the scene using the OLED display as a framing assistant, then depress the two-stage physical shutter button to lock focus and grab the shot. In stand-alone mode, the DxO ONE provides a fun, retro-style of photographing without "chimping," and makes browsing newly captured images a surprising and delightful experience. Best of all, when using the DxO ONE in stand-alone mode, all of your preferred camera settings for aperture, shutter speed, ISO, metering, white balance, etc. are preserved, exactly as you set them in the iOS app. For example, if you prefer to capture portraits at f/1.8, the camera will always be ready at f/1.8 when you pull it out of your pocket. And because the DxO ONE has a physical shutter button, it works even if you're wearing gloves. So when you're on the slopes, set the camera to 1/4000s (or higher), then when you pull the camera out of your ski jacket the DxO ONE is immediately ready to freeze fast action. "During an assignment for Rolls-Royce Motor Cars I had the misfortune of seriously injuring myself during a biking accident," said Robert Leslie, professional photographer and amateur cyclist. "Much to my client's surprise I was able to complete the studio session and capture some incredible im[...]



DxOMark Mobile report: Sony Xperia M5

Tue, 16 Feb 2016 02:05:00 Z

DxOMark Mobile Report: Sony Xperia M5 Summary In terms of processing power, look and feel the Sony Xperia M5 is categorized below Sony's Xperia Z flagship line of smartphones. However, like the Z-models it's dust-proof and waterproof and has a lot to offer in the photography department. In the rear camera a 21.5MP Sony Exmor sensor with on-chip phase detection is combined with an F2.2. aperture, and is capable of 4K video recording. Frequent self-portrait shooters will appreciate the 13MP front camera.  With a DxOMark Mobile score of 79 the Sony Xperia Z5 currently ranks as the best mid-range device in the DxOMark smartphone rankings and performs on the same level as previous generation flagship phones like the Sony Xperia Z3 or the Samsung Galaxy S5. When shooting still images with the Xperia M5 the DxO testers liked its 'good detail preservation, good noise levels and a fast and generally accurate autofocus'. However, they also found 'loss of sharpness in the corners, occasional white balance casts and visible exposure and color irregularities when shooting outdoors'. In flash mode they criticized 'strong chroma noise, especially near the corners'. In video mode the team notes 'fast autofocus, good colors and white balance in bright light and fast exposure and white balance transition'. On the downside, they noted a 'strong jello effect and loss of detail, slightly desaturated colors and visible noise in low light'. They also found the AF to acquire focus abruptly and not have any tracking capabilities. Still Photography Color, Exposure and Contrast The DxOMark team found that the Sony Xperia M5  images showed 'generally good exposure' but also identified a range of problems: the white balance sometimes fails under daylight and colors can be desaturated. Under tungsten light a yellow cast is visible and exposure and color irregularities are visible when shooting outdoors. The testers also found blown highlights in bright scenes.  Overall DxOMark awarded the Sony Xperia M5 scores of: 4.4 out of 5 for Exposure 4.0 out of 5 for White Balance accuracy 4.1 out of 5 for Color shading in low light* 4.2 out of 5 for Color shading in bright light* 3.0 out of 5 for Color Rendering in low light 4.3 out of 5 for Color Rendering in bright light *Color Shading is the nasty habit cellphone cameras have of rendering different areas of the frame with different color shifts, resulting in pictures with, for example, pinkish centers and greenish corners. Noise and Details DxOMark's engineers reported that the Sony Xperia M5 images show 'good detail preservation and noise levels in all conditions'. On the downside, 'exposure time is slightly too long in low light'. Texture Acutance Texture acutance is a way of measuring the ability of a camera to capture images that preserve fine details, particularly the kind of low contrast detail (such as fine foliage, hair or fur) that can be blurred away by noise reduction or obliterated by excessive sharpening. Sharpness is an important part of the quality of an image, but while it's easy to look at an image and decide visually whether it's sharp or not, the objective measurement of sharpness is less straightforward. An image can be defined as 'sharp' if edges are sharp and if fine details are visible. In-camera processing means that it's possible to have one of these (sharp edges) but not the other (fine details). Conventional MTF measurements tell us how sharp an edge is, but have drawbacks when it comes to measuring fine detail pr[...]



DxOMark Mobile report: OnePlus 2

Fri, 22 Jan 2016 19:14:00 Z

DxOMark Mobile Report: OnePlus 2 Summary Like its predecessor the OnePlus 2 offers the specification of a high-end phone at a budget price point. The camera's 13MP resolution isn't anything out of the ordinary these days, but optical image stabilization and a laser-assisted AF system are usually only found on expensive top-end models. Images are captured through an F2.0 lens with six elements, and in low light a dual-LED flash helps get skin tones right. The OnePlus 2 is capable of 4K video and can record 720p slow-motion footage at 120 frames per second. For image viewing and composition there is a 5.5-inch 1080p LCD and the Android operating system is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor and 3 or 4GB of RAM.  With a DxOMark Mobile score of 76, the OnePlus 2 performs on the same level as Apple's iPhone 5s or the Sony Xperia Z1 and occupies a joint 22nd place in the DxOMark smartphone rankings. The DxOMark testers liked 'very good detail and fine luminance noise in outdoor images' and 'good detail preservation in low light'. They also noted the 'fast and accurate autofocus in bright light' and 'good exposure, detail preservation and color accuracy' in flash mode. On the downside, 'pictures are slightly under-exposed', especially in high-contrast scenes which can result in clipped shadow areas. The testers also found the 'yellow cast under tungsten light' was too strong and the AF did not work accurately in trigger mode. There is also 'color shading in all light conditions' and 'visible color fringing and ringing'. In video mode the DxO team noted 'low noise in bright light' but criticized 'frequent unnecessary refocusing and focus failure, color non-uniformities' and jerkiness due to low frame rates in low light. 'Exposure transition is not smooth' and 'image shake is very noticeable' in indoor recordings. The testers also noted a pink cast under low tungsten light.  Still Photography Color, Exposure and Contrast The DxOMark team found that the OnePlus 2 images showed 'good white balance in outdoor conditions but 'pictures were slightly under-exposed, especially in high-contrast scenes', with clipped shadow areas, 'color shading is visible' and the usual 'yellow cast under tungsten light is too strong'. Overall DxOMark awarded the OnePlus 2 scores of: 4.3 out of 5 for Exposure 4.6 out of 5 for White Balance accuracy 3.5 out of 5 for Color shading in low light* 4.1 out of 5 for Color shading in bright light* 3.0 out of 5 for Color Rendering in low light 4.5 out of 5 for Color Rendering in bright light *Color Shading is the nasty habit cellphone cameras have of rendering different areas of the frame with different color shifts, resulting in pictures with, for example, pinkish centers and greenish corners. Noise and Details DxOMark's engineers reported that the OnePlus 2 images show 'very good detail and fine luminance noise in outdoor conditions and good detail preservation in low light'. However, they also found 'visible noise in areas of plain color in low light'.  Texture Acutance Texture acutance is a way of measuring the ability of a camera to capture images that preserve fine details, particularly the kind of low contrast detail (such as fine foliage, hair or fur) that can be blurred away by noise reduction or obliterated by excessive sharpening. Sharpness is an important part of the quality of an image, but while it's easy to look at an image and decide visually whether it's sharp or not, the objective measurement of sharpness [...]



DxOMark Mobile report: HTC One A9

Fri, 15 Jan 2016 19:42:00 Z

DxOMark Mobile Report: HTC One A9 Summary In the HTC device lineup the One A9 sits just below the flagship One M9. However, in the camera department, with its faster F2.0 aperture and optical image stabilization, it actually offers some advantages over the M9. On the downside it has to make do with a lower 13MP pixel count and Full-HD video instead of the M9's 21MP still images and 4K video footage. There is also a dual-LED flash and the A9 is, like the M9, capable of recording DNG Raw files. With a DxOMark Mobile score of 78 the HTC A9 achieves a 9 point better result than the M9 but cannot place itself among the currently best smartphone cameras. It performs on a similar level as previous generation devices such as the Google Nexus 6 or Sony Xperia Z2 and slots in at a joint number 19 in the DxOMark smartphone rankings. During testing the DxOMark team liked the "fast and accurate autofocus in bright light conditions" but also found a number of problems: "in high-contrast scenes images are often under-exposed and lack dynamic range, when shooting in daylight and low tungsten light images often show a pink color cast" and the "shutter speed in low light is too low  (1/8 s at 20 Lux), resulting in blurred images." The testers also found "autofocus instabilities in preview in all conditions" and over-exposed images and AF-irregularities when shooting with flash.  In video mode the DxO team liked the "good color rendering and white balance transition" and "low noise levels". On the downside, "fine detail is lost in all conditions, autofocus overshoots are strongly visible, mainly from macro to infinity, and there is an unpleasant jello effect". The testers also found a "lack of detail in the shadow areas" when recording video in low light and the stabilization to be inefficient, particularly for roll correction. Still Photography Color, Exposure and Contrast The DxOMark team found that when shooting with the HTC One A9 "colors are pleasant in all conditions" but "in high-contrast-scenes images are often under-exposed and lack dynamic range" and "white balance often has a pink cast when shooting in daylight or low tungsten light". The testers also found "slight color shading in low light and bright light conditions" and that the "white balance is sometimes inconsistent across consecutive shots". Overall DxOMark awarded the HTC One A9 scores of: 4.2 out of 5 for Exposure 3.5 out of 5 for White Balance accuracy 4.1 out of 5 for Color shading in low light* 4.1 out of 5 for Color shading in bright light* 3.0 out of 5 for Color Rendering in low light 4.5 out of 5 for Color Rendering in bright light *Color Shading is the nasty habit cellphone cameras have of rendering different areas of the frame with different color shifts, resulting in pictures with, for example, pinkish centers and greenish corners. Noise and Details DxOMark's engineers reported that the HTC One A9 images show "good edge preservation" but also that "fine detail is lost in bright light and low light conditions, image blur is caused by slow shutter speeds in low light and luminance noise is visible in low light". Texture Acutance Texture acutance is a way of measuring the ability of a camera to capture images that preserve fine details, particularly the kind of low contrast detail (such as fine foliage, hair or fur) that can be blurred away by noise reduction or obliterated by excessive sharpening. Sharpness is an important part of the quality of an image, but wh[...]



DxOMark Mobile report: BlackBerry Priv

Tue, 12 Jan 2016 22:38:00 Z

DxOMark Mobile Report: BlackBerry Priv Summary The BlackBerry Priv combines Google's Android operating system with BlackBerry's security features and a slider form factor with hardware qwerty-keyboard. In the camera module an 18MP sensor works together with a Schneider Kreuznach designed lens and optical image stabilization. The camera is capable of recording 4K video and there is also a dual-tone LED flash. 32GB of built-in storage can be expanded via a microSD-slot. With a DxOMark Mobile score of 82, the BlackBerry Priv performs on the same level as Apple's iPhone 6s or the Sony Xperia Z3+ and occupies a joint eleventh place in the DxOMark smartphone rankings. The DxOMark testers liked the 'very good exposure with wide dynamic range, generally accurate and fast autofocus, well-preserved detail, especially in bright light, pleasant colors and good overall flash performance'. Points of criticism included the 'sometimes inaccurate white balance, strong ringing, comparatively high noise levels in bright light and over-saturated colors when shooting with flash'. In video mode the DxO team liked the 'very good noise reduction, good detail preservation in bright light and the accurate and smooth autofocus'. On the downside, 'stabilization causes visible frame shifts and rotations, a pink cast is visible in low light and the lens sometimes refocuses unnecessarily'. Still Photography Color, Exposure and Contrast The DxOMark team found that the BlackBerry Priv images showed 'very good exposure with wide dynamic range and pleasant colors'. As negatives they noted that the 'white balance is sometimes inaccurate, with a yellow, pink or blue cast in bright light'. They also noted 'some color shading in outdoor and low light conditions' and a 'pinkish cast in low tungsten light'. Overall DxOMark awarded the BlackBerry Priv scores of: 4.7 out of 5 for Exposure 4.1 out of 5 for White Balance accuracy 3.3 out of 5 for Color shading in low light* 4.1 out of 5 for Color shading in bright light* 3.0 out of 5 for Color Rendering in low light 4.5 out of 5 for Color Rendering in bright light *Color Shading is the nasty habit cellphone cameras have of rendering different areas of the frame with different color shifts, resulting in pictures with, for example, pinkish centers and greenish corners. Noise and Details DxOMark's engineers reported that the BlackBerry Priv images show 'well preserved detail, especially in bright light' but 'compared to other smartphones noise levels are high in bright light'. Texture Acutance Texture acutance is a way of measuring the ability of a camera to capture images that preserve fine details, particularly the kind of low contrast detail (such as fine foliage, hair or fur) that can be blurred away by noise reduction or obliterated by excessive sharpening. Sharpness is an important part of the quality of an image, but while it's easy to look at an image and decide visually whether it's sharp or not, the objective measurement of sharpness is less straightforward. An image can be defined as 'sharp' if edges are sharp and if fine details are visible. In-camera processing means that it's possible to have one of these (sharp edges) but not the other (fine details). Conventional MTF measurements tell us how sharp an edge is, but have drawbacks when it comes to measuring fine detail preservation. Image processing algorithms can detect edges and enhance their sharpness, but they can also[...]