Subscribe: What's New at Divorce Online
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
attorney  court appearances  court  divorce online  divorce  economic times  emotional  emotions  family  gornbein  life  online  people  times 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: What's New at Divorce Online

What's New at Divorce Online

Divorce Online provides free articles and information on the financial, legal, psychological, real-estate, and other aspects of divorce. Additionally, you can turn to the Professional Referral section of Divorce Online to locate professional assistance ne

Last Build Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2013 15:41:50 +0000

Copyright: Copyright © 2007, American Divorce Information Network. All rights reserved.

January Divorce

Thu, 03 Jan 2013 15:38:15 +0000

Why January

The New Year is a time for making changes to improve our lives.

For many in unhappy marriages, one of those changes is divorce. January has long been a popular month for divorce filings.

Professional lives slow down during the holidays, and people focus on family, togetherness and traditions. But simmering below the holiday cheer is grave disappointment for some.

Spouses may not live up to expectations. Or one too many drinks at a Christmas party could lead to inappropriate gestures or remarks, which, for those who have been unhappy for a long time, could be the straw that breaks the camel's back.

Some couples have decided to keep up appearances for one last holiday season as an intact family.

"I've had a lot of people retain me and say, 'Don't file the papers until the first of the year,'" says Henry S. Gornbein, P.A., and Partner at Gornbein, Fletcher & Smith, PLLC, a family law firm in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

The Saga of Divorce Online

Wed, 13 Jun 2012 12:08:31 +0000

Back in 1995, I was approached by a therapist and a web designer, talking about the Internet.  At that time, the Internet was almost unheard of.  I had no idea what it was.  The web designer was a man named John Thawley, who I work with to this day.  The therapist was involved in the beginning but dropped off the face of the earth shortly after the website was launched.  The website was called  It was launched in 1995.  In May of 1996, one of the most salient features of Divorce Online, entitled ‘He Said…She Said’, was launched.  Divorce Online was a site with a goal of approaching divorce related issues legally, psychologically, and economically.  There were many articles posted that are still relevant to this day.


Tue, 17 Jan 2012 16:12:34 +0000

By Ariana E. Cha and Jennifer Dixon

Here are some questions parents should ask themselves when considering joint custody:

Q: How well do you feel you and the other parent can get along?

A: Parents should cooperate with each other. "Support the child's relationship with both parents," Barbara Nordhaus, assistant clinical professor at the Yale Child Study Center, said Thursday. "Drop-offs and pickups should go smoothly. The better a couple can get along, the easier joint custody will be for the children," said Beth Clark, clinical psychologist and a consultant to the University of Michigan Center for the Family and Child. Leslie de Pietro, coordinator of Family Care Resources at the University of Michigan, agreed. "Children shouldn't be used a pawns." Parents should meet regularly to discuss the joint custody situation without the children.

Divorce Recovery: Releasing the Toxic Emotions

Tue, 17 Jan 2012 16:11:58 +0000

Shelley Stile
Life Coach/Divorce Recovery for Women

The way to recover and thrive after divorce is simple: Until you can release the toxic emotions surrounding your divorce, it is impossible for you to move forward in life and be happy.  It takes enormous commitment and effort but it can be achieved.  If you want to lead a new life that is both fulfilling and happy, you must let go of the negative emotions and thoughts that hold you back from creating a life you love.  And guess what else?  Who do you suppose pays the biggest price when it comes to toxic emotions?  You.

During the divorce process, the negative emotions that you were already experiencing in your marriage go haywire!  During times of crisis, our world appears to crumble and with it our concept of whom we are. Our mind chatter turns up the volume to deafening levels.  We question everything.  We feel emotions so intense that we often wonder if we will survive them.  Anger, sadness, depression, rage, grief, resentment, bitterness, and confusion are some of the feelings we are hit with.  


Tue, 12 Jan 2010 15:25:56 +0000

By Henry Gornbein

We have been going through some of the worst economic times since The Great Depression.  Numerous articles and newscasts have stated either that the housing market has bottomed out, or is still going down.  In Michigan, we have the most depressed housing market in the United States.  Other states, including Florida, California, and Arizona – just to name a few, are also going through some horrible economic times with regard to housing.  In the past, before the economy bottomed out, homes were a family’s most valuable asset.  In the last year and a half, that has changed substantially.  In many of my divorce cases, the marital home is no longer an asset, but is heavily encumbered by debt.  Many people purchased homes in the past ten years, expecting their home to become a piggy bank for future savings and retirement.  Sadly, this is no longer the case.  Many people were obtaining mortgages, followed by home equity loans and second mortgages, based upon numbers that no longer exist.


Tue, 08 Dec 2009 20:34:38 +0000


Sat, 21 Nov 2009 16:06:50 +0000

In these tough economic times, where people are trying to save money and want to have an amicable divorce, an excellent way to do this is through a pre-divorce mediation package.  I have handled several of these successfully, and would like to explain how it works.

Both the husband and wife meet with an attorney who specializes in family law and is also certified as a mediator, as are all of the attorneys at Gornbein Smith Peskin-Shepherd.  An agreement is reached at the first meeting that the attorney will be acting as a mediator and will not be representing either the husband or wife in the divorce.  The role of the attorney will be to meet with the parties to cover all issues in the divorce in an effort to help them resolve everything in an amicable fashion.


Fri, 29 May 2009 15:37:55 +0000

By  Henry S. Gornbein

9.   Find out as much about your financials as possible before you file a divorce, so that there will be no surprises.

8.   Try to find out as much as possible about your job security and if you aren’t employed, see what your options are for employment.

7.   Carefully consider all options, especially whether or not the marriage can be saved.

6.   Think about your house. Does it have a negative equity? Can you afford the payments? Do you want to stay in the house, or leave?

Nine Ways to Deal with the System in Tough Times

Thu, 02 Apr 2009 18:35:50 +0000

by Henry S. Gornbein

9. Once your divorce is filed, find out as much as you can about the judge.

8. Stay out of court as much as possible because court appearances are costly, not only financially, but also from an emotional standpoint. Judges will not know you or your case unless you are in a situation where you are in court every week on motions or hearings, and often the judge will be getting a very negative impression of you.

7. Make sure that you and your attorney are well prepared before you go to court. Floundering around in court can create a bad impression, and is also costly.

6. Through your attorney, see if your judge is one who will cut court appearances to minimize expense. This can be done by, in some instances, having original pre-trials and some court appearances done by phone if the judge and the other attorney will agree.

The Real Divorce: Cutting the Emotional Ties that Bind

Wed, 02 Jul 2008 00:39:49 +0000

by Shelley Stile 

Your divorce decree is only step one in moving into a new life after divorce.  The real divorce is the cutting of the emotional, mental and physical ties that still bind you to your ex-husband.  This is the real work of divorce recovery: becoming a single woman possessed of confidence, self-esteem, an enthusiasm for life and most important, a complete break from the emotional turmoil that led to your divorce in the first place.

All too often, women experience the same conflicts with their ex that originally led to divorce: constant arguments, reactive behavior leading to emotional upsets, old patterns of reliance, the barrage of destructive barbs aimed at your self-esteem and deep hurts.   To truly be divorced you must put forth great effort and inner work that will sever your ties to your ex and you must build a structure that will facilitate that work.

Let me give you examples: You and your ex have children together therefore you must be in contact with one another on a regular basis.  Unfortunately, your discussions with him always end in an argument.  Nothing happens easily.  The deep resentments and hurts suffered in your marriage and actual divorce remain intact.  You each know each other’s hot buttons and continue to push those buttons resulting in upsets.  It’s the old marriage still running the game. You continually get sucked into this abyss.