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Preview: Boyer Lectures

Boyer Lectures - Fast, smart and connected: What is it to be human, and Australian, in a digital world?



Each year since 1959, the ABC has sparked conversation about critical ideas with the Boyer Lectures. In 2017, the Boyer Lectures are by Professor Genevieve Bell. Her series is called Fast, smart and connected: What is it to be human, and Australian, in a



Copyright: Copyright 2018, Australian Broadcasting Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
 



04 | Fast, smart and connected: How to build our digital future

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 06:00:00 +1100

Professor Genevieve Bell outlines her proposal for how Australia should build its digital future. This talk was recorded in front of a live audience in Studio 22 at ABC Ultimo on Saturday 21 October, 2017, and features questions from former Boyer lecturer and sociologist Eva Cox and chief commissioner of the Greater Sydney Commission Lucy Turnbull.Professor Genevieve Bell presents the 2017 Boyer Lectures at ABC Studio 22. (ABC RN: Tiger Webb)


Media Files:
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Bonus | Fast, smart and connected: Your hopes and fears for where technology is heading

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 06:00:00 +1100

We asked what your hopes and fears are for where technology is heading, and here's what you told us.2017 Boyer Lecturer, Professor Genevieve Bell. (Artist: Freda Chiu)


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03 | Fast, smart and connected: All technology has a history (and a country)

Thu, 05 Oct 2017 06:00:00 +1100

Professor Genevieve Bell reveals how new technologies change life, but rarely in the ways we anticipate. How might the origin stories of the typewriter, the robot and electricity equip us to invent the future?2017 Boyer Lecturer, Professor Genevieve Bell, and Elektro. (Artist: Grace Lee.)


Media Files:
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02 | Fast, smart and connected: Dealing lightning with both hands

Wed, 04 Oct 2017 06:00:00 +1100

Professor Genevieve Bell looks at how personal computers and the internet have reshaped our lives, and the possibilities we’ve imagined for ourselves and each other.2017 Boyer Lecturer, Professor Genevieve Bell. (Artist: Freda Chiu)


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01 | Fast, smart and connected: Where it all began

Tue, 03 Oct 2017 06:00:00 +1100

Professor Genevieve Bell explains why she’s returned home after decades in Silicon Valley, and explores Australia’s role in building our current digital world.2017 Boyer Lecturer, Professor Genevieve Bell. (Artist: Grace Lee)


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Introducing 2017 Boyer Lecturer, Prof Genevieve Bell

Mon, 04 Sep 2017 10:30:00 +1000

What does it mean to be human, and Australian, in a digital world?2017 Boyer Lecturer, Professor Genevieve Bell from the Australian National University. (ABC RN: Tegan Osborne)


Media Files:
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Social justice and health: making a difference

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 12:30:00 +1100

There are examples from around the world, of community and government actions that make a difference to health inequalities. Creating the conditions for individuals to take control over their lives will enable social flourishing of all members of society.Community and government must act together for equality in health (Visions of America Getty)


Media Files:
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Living and working

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 12:30:00 +1100

Unemployment is bad for health, but work can damage health, too. When work is no longer the way out of poverty, health suffers.The nature of work determines our health (Cameron Spencer Getty)


Media Files:
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Give every child the best start

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 12:30:00 +1100

Absence of the nurturing and presence of the harmful are important for the whole of life and are strong contributors to inequalities in adult health. There is much we can do to make things better at both the level of national policy and at the local level supporting families and children.A participant in a NT Department of Corrections Family Violence program (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)


Media Files:
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Health inequality and the causes of the causes

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 12:30:00 +1100

There are large inequalities in health within and between countries. To explain this we have to look at the social determinants of health—the conditions in which people are born, grow, live work and age; and inequities in power, money and resources.Michael Marmot delivers the first of the 2016 Boyer Lectures at the ABC's Eugene Goossen's Hall (Alex McClintock)


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Social justice and health: making a difference

Sat, 24 Sep 2016 13:05:00 +1000

There are examples from around the world, of community and government actions that make a difference to health inequalities. Creating the conditions for individuals to take control over their lives will enable social flourishing of all members of society.Community and government must act together for equality in health (Visions of America Getty)


Media Files:
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/image/7825958-1x1-1400x1400.jpg




Living and working

Sat, 17 Sep 2016 13:05:00 +1000

Unemployment is bad for health, but work can damage health, too. When work is no longer the way out of poverty, health suffers.The nature of work determines our health (Cameron Spencer Getty)


Media Files:
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/image/7825920-1x1-1400x1400.jpg




Give every child the best start

Sat, 10 Sep 2016 13:05:00 +1000

Absence of the nurturing and presence of the harmful are important for the whole of life and are strong contributors to inequalities in adult health. There is much we can do to make things better at both the level of national policy and at the local level supporting families and children.A participant in a NT Department of Corrections Family Violence program (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)


Media Files:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/6973226-1x1-1400x1400.jpg




Health inequality and the causes of the causes

Sat, 03 Sep 2016 13:05:00 +1000

There are large inequalities in health within and between countries. To explain this we have to look at the social determinants of health—the conditions in which people are born, grow, live work and age; and inequities in power, money and resources.Michael Marmot delivers the first of the 2016 Boyer Lectures at the ABC's Eugene Goossen's Hall (Alex McClintock)


Media Files:
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/image/7808748-1x1-1400x1400.jpg




The Birthplace of the Fortunate

Sun, 18 Oct 2015 12:05:00 +1100

Australia now finds itself on the centre stage. Staying there is the challenge. In the final of the 2015 Boyer Lectures series, Dr Michael Fullilove calls for a larger and more ambitious foreign policy; one that ensures that our national interests once again align with our national capabilities.Michael Fullilove delivers the final in the 2015 ABC Boyer Lecture Series (Anastasia Konstantelos)


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Foreign policy begins at home

Sun, 11 Oct 2015 12:05:00 +1100

In his third Boyer lecture, Michael Fullilove argues the need for a larger politics and some big thinking on the economy in order to respond to global challenges, like immigration and climate policy.New Australian citizens in Darwin on Australia Day 2015 (James Purtill/ABC News)


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A three-dimensional foreign policy

Sun, 04 Oct 2015 12:05:00 +1100

In his second Boyer Lecture, Dr Michael Fullilove examines how the dizzying rise of China has pulled Australia onto a new world stage as a key player, a leap that calls for a serious examination of foreign policyForeign Minister Julie Bishop meets with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon at UN Headquarters in New York, Thursday 24 Sept, 2015 (Trevor Collens, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade CC-BY-3.0)


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Present at the destruction

Sun, 27 Sep 2015 12:05:00 +1000

In this first lecture, delivered at Peking University in Beijing, Dr Michael Fullilove explains the crumbling of world order. As wealth and power shifts to the East,  Australia finds itself in a new and precarious position.Michael Fullilove delivers the first 2015 Boyer lecture in Beijing (ABC)


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People for Science

Sat, 27 Sep 2014 13:05:00 +1000

In the fourth and final lecture Professor Cory highlights the concerning scientific brain drain in this country: "We are losing women from all areas of science and the deficit at senior levels is particularly disturbing."First female radio astronomer Ruby Payne Scott was forced to resign from CSIRO in 1951 when she became pregnant with her son. (Peter Hall - Payne Scott's son)


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Science for a Healthy Environment

Sat, 20 Sep 2014 13:05:00 +1000

In the third lecture Professor Suzanne Cory reflects on her other great passion, the environment, and warns that 'humankind is fouling the nest' and that if action is not taken soon, by 2100 Earth will be hotter than any time in the last few million years making mass species extinctions and global human conflicts over energy and water inevitable.'Our only lifeboat in the universe' as viewed from space. (NASA)


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Science for a Healthy Economy

Sat, 13 Sep 2014 13:05:00 +1000

In the second lecture Professor Cory shows how extraordinarily important scientific research and development is for our economy.Artist's impression of ASKAP antennas at the Murchison Radio Astronomy Observatory (CSIRO)


Media Files:
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Science for a Healthy People

Sat, 06 Sep 2014 13:05:00 +1000

In this first lecture Professor Cory reflects on where medical science has come from and where it is heading, drawing out implications for health and the economy.Microscopic image of a dendritic cell. (Professor Jose Villadangos and Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research)


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Advance Australia Fair

Sun, 24 Nov 2013 12:05:18 +1100

Looking to the future of Australian CitizenshipAdvancing fair: in Australia and in the world


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Australians at their best

Sun, 17 Nov 2013 12:05:59 +1100

Courage, compassion and resilience in everyday life(Australians at their best)


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Watching the women

Sun, 10 Nov 2013 12:05:42 +1100

The powerful role of Australian Women(The power of women's stories)


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Joining the neighbourhood

Sun, 03 Nov 2013 12:05:44 +1100

A personal story of equal rights advocacy(Her Excellency, The Honourable Quentin Bryce AC CVO, Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia.)


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Lecture 5 - Counting Our Victories: the end of Garvey-ism and the soft bigotry of low expectation

Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:30:00 +1100

In her final lecture, Professor Langton reflects on the economic transformation underway in the lives of Aboriginal people -- from increasing Indigenous enrolments in higher education, through rising employment in mining and other rural industries, to the explosion of cultural production by Aboriginal people into the Australian mainstream not only on canvas and on the stage, but also in music, literature, cinema  and television.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2012/12/bls_20121216.mp3




Lecture 4: The conceit of wilderness ideology

Sun, 09 Dec 2012 17:30:00 +1100

In her fourth lecture, Professor Langton examines how some beliefs within the nature conservation movement in Australia have perpetuated the idea that Aboriginal people are the enemies of nature, and describes recent examples of Indigenous tractional land practices which combine western ecological knowledge to create sustainable and economically viable custodianship of country,


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2012/12/bls_20121209.mp3




Lecture 3: Old barriers and new models. The private sector, government and the economic empowerment of Aboriginal Australians

Sun, 02 Dec 2012 17:30:00 +1100

In her third lecture, Professor Langton illuminates the experiences of two Aboriginal communities who are levering economic advancement through agreements with mining companies, and examines why it is that the private sector is leading the way in forging new working models with Indigenous Australia while government policies lag far behind.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2012/12/bls_20121202.mp3




Lecture 2 - From Protectionism to Economic Advancement

Sun, 25 Nov 2012 17:30:00 +1100

In her second lecture, Professor Langton examines the confluence of historical, political and social factors which have created entrenched barriers against the economic advancement of Aboriginal people in Australia.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2012/11/bls_20121125.mp3




Lecture 1 - Changing the paradigm: Mining Companies, Native Title and Aboriginal Australians

Sun, 18 Nov 2012 17:05:00 +1100

In this first lecture Professor Langton explores the changing relationship between Aboriginal communities and mining companies since the 1993 Mabo agreement and native title legislation, and asks whether this could offer a model for the economic empowerment of all Indigenous people in Australia.Professor Marcia Langton (Patrick Hamilton Photography)


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Lecture 4: A Home in Fiction

Sun, 11 Dec 2011 17:00:38 +1100

It is my great good luck that the words I use are English words, which means I live in a very old nation of open borders; a rich, deep, multi-layered, promiscuous universe, infused with Latin, German, French, Greek, Arabic and countless other tongues. I would not be able to swim so far, dive so deep, in a linguistically isolated language such as Hungarian, or even a protectively elitist one such as French.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2011/12/bls_20111211.mp3




Lecture 3: At Home in the World

Sun, 04 Dec 2011 17:00:46 +1100

If one definition of the word 'home' is a goal or objective, then I have to be clear that becoming the kind of journalist who covered war was never my goal or intention.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2011/12/bls_20111204.mp3




Lecture 2: A Home on Bland Street

Sun, 27 Nov 2011 17:00:00 +1100

The idea of home is bigger than the floorplan of any given four walls or the mass of any roof line. It cannot be compassed by rote recitations of suburb or postcode, nation or state. In last week's lecture, I mentioned the various definitions that dictionaries give for that small, heavily laden word, home. Tonight I would like to explore some of them: home as 'a place of origin, a native habitat', home as 'an environment offering security and happiness' and home as 'the place where something is discovered, founded, developed or promoted. A source.'


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2011/11/bls_20111127.mp3




Lecture 1: Our Only Home

Sun, 20 Nov 2011 17:00:00 +1100

In dictionaries, definitions of home are various. It is both 'a place of origin, a starting position' and 'a goal or destination.' It may also be 'an environment offering security and happiness' or 'the place where something is discovered, founded, developed or promoted. A source.'


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2011/11/bls_20111120.mp3




Lecture 6: The Republic of Learning

Sun, 19 Dec 2010 17:00:00 +1100

Universities may appear unchanged and enduring, yet the world of the mind is shifting quickly. This is a moment of unparalleled growth, but also of new challenges — the web, on-line learning, and international competition. Australian higher education must think about its role in the republic of learning, so there is a place for every citizen, for every community.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2010/12/bls_20101219.mp3




Lecture 5: Fired with Enthusiasm

Sun, 12 Dec 2010 17:00:00 +1100

In the modern university, the new sits awkwardly alongside the ancient — medieval gowns and corporate branding, academic board and a chief financial officer. Yet despite its many contradictions, campus remains a place of vitality and imagination, as each new generation seeks its place in the world.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2010/12/bls_20101212.mp3




Lecture 4: Becoming a Citizen

Sun, 05 Dec 2010 17:00:00 +1100

Who gets to university will set the pattern for the life to follow — not just in income and profession, but across almost every dimension of health and happiness. So access to higher learning is a profound matter of social justice. Ensuring equality of opportunity to higher learning must start at the very beginning of education.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2010/12/bls_20101205.mp3




Lecture 3: Research! A Mere Excuse for Idleness

Sun, 28 Nov 2010 17:00:00 +1100

Research is not an ancient feature of the university, yet has become central to their identity. To tackle the really big questions, such as containing malaria, requires networks of researchers across many institutions. It is the republic at its most inspirational as it discovers and communicates the excitement of new knowledge.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2010/11/bls_20101128.mp3




Lecture 2: A Lectern in a Dusty Room

Sun, 21 Nov 2010 17:00:00 +1100

On Open Day across the nation, the republic of learning is on display. Amid the multitude of courses on offer, the classroom is changing — new technology, new ways of teaching, and an old debate about how best to share knowledge with the next generation.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2010/11/bls_20101121.mp3




Lecture 1: The Global Moment

Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:00:00 +1100

During the Renaissance, a new generation, living for the first time in a world of printing, created a conversation across borders and languages.


Media Files:
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Lecture 6: Australia's Future: Paying it Forward

Sun, 13 Dec 2009 17:00:00 +1100

With climate change, the republic, national security, a bill of rights, and the economy, what kind of future are we creating for our children and their children? Every decision we make on the big issues will have a profound effect on their lives, so what can we do now to ensure that we give them the best possible Australia?


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2009/12/bls_20091213.mp3




Lecture 5: From Nino Cullotta to Hazim El Masri

Sun, 06 Dec 2009 17:00:00 +1100

How did we get to where we are as a nation? How many mistakes did we make along the way and how many things did we get right? Over General Peter Cosgrove's lifetime we have grown from a population of 7.5 million to just over 22 million, and in that time our society -- and as a result our nation -- has changed.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2009/12/bls_20091206.mp3




Lecture 4: The Politics of Ordinary Australians

Sun, 29 Nov 2009 17:00:00 +1100

Australia has had its fair share of pivotal political moments over the years, moments that have engaged the interest and opinions of its people. Yet, through them all, our democracy and our institutions have stayed strong and we have remained peaceful.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2009/11/bls_20091129.mp3




Lecture 3: Leading In Australia

Sun, 22 Nov 2009 17:00:00 +1100

Peter Cosgrove has led the army and then the entire defence force, so he is eminently well placed to talk about leadership. So for him, what makes a good leader? Does it matter if that leader is running a business, a country, or the school tuckshop?


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2009/11/bls_20091122.mp3




Lecture 2: Australia's Regional Relationships

Sun, 15 Nov 2009 17:00:00 +1100

If Australia were for sale how would the real estate agent describe it? If a potential buyer asked the neighbours what they thought, what would they say? In reality, the USA may be our closest ally but it's not our nearest neighbour, and how we interact with the countries closest to us will determine our challenges and our opportunities for the future.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2009/11/bls_20091115.mp3




Lecture 1: National Security at the Breakfast Table?

Sun, 08 Nov 2009 17:00:00 +1100

He's spent a lifetime puzzling over national security and in his first lecture, General Peter Cosgrove makes mention of all the wars we've been involved in since WW2 and talks about their place in the Australian psyche. They might have been considered other people's wars, but we knew intuitively they were ours as well.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2009/11/bls_20091108.mp3




Lecture 6: The 21st century: comforting the afflicted. And afflicting the comfortable

Sun, 07 Dec 2008 17:00:00 +1100

The Oxford of Rupert Murdoch's youth was one of the most privileged places on earth. But freedom and information have changed the order of things. On a global scale more people than ever are taking advantage of the revolution. And that's how it should be.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2008/12/bls_20081207.mp3




Lecture 5: The global middle class roars

Sun, 30 Nov 2008 17:00:00 +1100

Rupert Murdoch's recent trips to China and India have convinced him of one thing: there is no alternative to economic growth as a remedy for poverty. Caste and communism have condemned hundreds of millions to wretched lives.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2008/11/bls_20081130.mp3




Lecture 4: Fortune favours the smart

Sun, 23 Nov 2008 17:00:00 +1100

An important theme of the lectures is the pressing need for Australia to develop human capital. But to do this successfully our schools need serious reform, otherwise the global bar will seem set far beyond our reach.


Media Files:
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2008/11/bls_20081123.mp3