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BBC NEWS | Magazine Monitor: 10 Things...



The Magazine's recommended daily allowance of news, culture and your letters.



Last Build Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2013 18:15:00 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2013
 



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 12 Apr 2013 18:15:00 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience 1. Tears do not fall in space. More details (Daily Telegraph) 2. Employees who install new web browsers on their computers perform better on average than those who use the default pre-installed browser that came with their machine. More details (The Economist) 3. Methane eating micro-organisms carry out a deep clean of the oceans after an oil spill. More details 4. Scientists are conducting searches for signs of extraterrestrial engineering. More details (New Scientist) 5. The most popular place to hide valuables is a sock drawer. More details (Daily Telegraph) 6. Fractions of virtual currency Bitcoin are known as satoshis. More details (The Economist) 7. People in China hold "fake funerals" for themselves, so they can "enjoy" the day. More details (Metro) 8. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak belonged to a group of hackers and hobbyists called the Homebrew Computer Club. More details 9. Brains can be rendered transparent. More details (Smithsonian Magazine) 10. Countries with the death penalty are now outnumbered by about five to one, by those who have abolished it. More details (Guardian)



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 05 Apr 2013 16:48:22 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience 1. The most "urban" job in America - that is, with the highest concentration in metro areas - is flight attendants. More details (The Atlantic) 2. Holly Golightly, heroine of Breakfast at Tiffany's, was originally going to be called Connie Gustafson. More details (The Independent) 3. Female octopuses stretch further to reach for food, researchers in Italy say. More details 4. Jeremy Clarkson's exploits on Top Gear are avidly followed by many people in Iran. More details 5. Exhaled breath can act as a "fingerprint" for individuals. More details 6. More than 100 billion Earth-like planets that could be home to life may exist in our galaxy. More details (Daily Telegraph) 7. Ordinary television signals can be used to track aircraft. More details (The Economist) 8. People who complete secondary school are, on average, 1cm taller in old age than those who don't. More details (Daily Telegraph) 9. All the gold in the world could fit into a cube with sides of just 20m (67ft). More details 10. It costs £50 a week to feed a 23kg rabbit - the world's largest. More details (Daily Express) Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 29 Mar 2013 13:40:52 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. "Rose-water novel" is the French term for Mills and Boon-style books. More details (The Times) 2. Teenagers who stay up late tend to be more intelligent than their early-to-bed peers. More details (Daily Telegraph) 3. Songs stuck in your head can be shifted by solving an anagram. More details (Daily Mail) 4. South Africa was included in the BRICS as it made for a better acronym than Nigeria. More details (Economist) 5. You can pay for a front row seat in the US Supreme Court. More details (New York Times) 6. Open plan offices stem from the idea of "Burolandschaft", meaning office landscaping. More details 7. Female Amazonian turtles are the only turtles to care for their young. More details (New Scientist) 8. Almost half the French - 43% - drink mineral water with meals. More details 9. The last Etonian to have a Number One hit in the UK was Humphrey Lyttleton. More details (Daily Telegraph) 10. At a Swedish dinner party you should never fold your napkin and put it on the table before the hostess has done so. More details (The Local) Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 22 Mar 2013 16:51:08 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. American literature has become more emotional and British books less so. More details (Public Library of Science ONE) 2. Jaffa cakes are MPs' favourite tea-time snack. More details (Daily Telegraph) 3. Russian bears get addicted to aviation fuel. More details (Daily Mirror) 4. South Korean media often refer to national politicians using only their initials. More details (Yonhap News Agency) 5. Despite huge variations in appearance, there is only one species of giant squid. More details 6. Noam Chomsky's tipple is gin and tonic. More details (Financial Times) 7. Relative to population size, Malta receives the most asylum applications. More details (Economist) 8. Twitter's logo used to be a garish green. More details (Twitter) 9. Locust is the only insect considered kosher. More details 10. Sydney Harbour ferry "the Anne Sergeant" is named after a netball coach. More details (Daily Telegraph) Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:12:50 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. Plants lace their nectar with caffeine to keep pollinators loyal. More details (New Scientist) 2. Hemingway never used a Moleskine notebook. More details (Guardian) 3. You can attract beluga whales by singing underwater. More details (Financial Times) 4. Shops get staff to strategically mess things up. More details 5. The phallus-shaped Spartobranchus tenuis was an ancient relative of acorn worms. More details 6. One of the Crossrail tunnelling machines is called 'Phyllis' after Phyllis Pearsall who produced the first A-Z. More details (Crossrail) 7. On the net's most crime-ridden network - Spectranet in Nigeria - 62% of addresses controlled by the ISP send out spam. More details 8. "Aunt" is the most popular pornographic search term in Syria. More details (Daily Telegraph) 9. Dominic West is a disciple of guru Babaji. More details (Financial Times) 10. Big eyes contributed to the Neanderthals' demise. More details Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 08 Mar 2013 15:46:48 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. Monkeys avoid selfish people. More details (Scientific American) 2. Lily pollen is poisonous to cats. More details (Daily Mail) 3. Nigel Farage writes a column for Total Sea Fishing magazine. More details (The Times) 4. Concrete can heal itself. More details (Economist) 5. There are more deer in the UK now than at any time since the last Ice Age. More details 6. Archbishop Justin Welby used to smuggle Bibles behind the Iron Curtain. More details (The Times) 7.The renewable energy agency for the South West of England has a poet in residence. More details (Regen SW) 8. Freezing an Android phone renders a user's confidential data accessible. More details 9. "White" magic remains legal under Indonesia's revised criminal code. More details (The Times) 10. People drum better in virtual reality when their avatar looks laid back. More details (New Scientist) Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 01 Mar 2013 12:45:38 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. In Brazil barbecuing is a form of public protest. More details (Financial Times) 2. Sarah Greene used to bite Peter Duncan's ankles to distract him during Blue Peter cookery demos. More details (The Guardian) 3. Haribos are so-named because of founder Hans Riegel and his hometown Bonn. More details (Monocle) 4. Dido's refrain "No freedom without love" has been adopted by rebel groups in Syria. More details 5. In North Korea, women are "encouraged" to choose from 18 officially sanctioned hairstyles. More details (Daily Mail) 6. While North Korean men have 10 options. More details (Daily Mail) 7. It takes a Parisian bistro about three weeks to get through a horse carcass. More details (Financial Times) 8. Cristiano Ronaldo has a naked picture of himself on the walls of his Madrid house. More details (The Sun) 9. Drone operators experience post-traumatic stress at the same rate as combat pilots. More details (New York Times) 10. Rats can communicate with each other via cables. More details Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 22 Feb 2013 14:31:41 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. William is the surname that has decreased the most since 1901. More details (Daily Express) 2. Penis size matters to female golden moles. More details 3. 1980s pop star Glenn Medeiros is the vice principal of a high school in Hawaii. More details (Daily Mail) 4. Chimps have the mental recall ability of people with savant syndrome. More details (Financial Times) 5. Car stickers of "Greater Hungary", incorporating parts of Romania, Slovakia, Serbia, Ukraine and Croatia, are a common sight in Budapest. More details (Economist) 6. The Swedes put their kids out in the snow to nap. More details 7. Women's brains have more language proteins than men's. More details (Science Daily) 8. France has more citizens being held hostage than any other country. More details (France 24) 9. Some Norwegians feel strongly about whether firewood is stacked bark up or bark down. More details (New York Times) 10. The average porn star is a California-born brunette named Nikki with a 34B cup size. More details (Daily Mail) Correction: An earlier version of 10 things contained an incorrect thing at number 9. Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 15 Feb 2013 14:15:43 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. Urban blackbirds grow up faster than their country cousins. More details 2. Fidgeting is good for men's concentration but bad for women's concentration. More details (Daily Mail) 3. For every person in the US bitten by a shark, 25 get bitten by New Yorkers. More details (BBC Radio 4) 4. Urban fox numbers haven't risen in 30 years. More details 5. Dame Maggie Smith has never watched an episode of Downton Abbey. More details (Daily Telegraph) 6. A Finnish radio station broadcasts news in Latin. More details 7. Members of Congress start taking the best seats 12 hours before the president gives his State of the Union speech. More details (Washington Post) 8. Workers at Amazon's warehouse in Rugeley walk past a life-sized cardboard image of a blonde woman who says: "This is the best job I have ever had!" More details (Financial Times) 9. Victorian students put crocodile skins on their walls. More details 10. Sea slugs have "disposable penises". More details Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 08 Feb 2013 16:02:29 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. Cockroaches groom themselves to improve their sense of smell. More details 2. Hartlepool United has players called Hartley and Poole. More details 3. Students can be awarded a £9,000 university bursary for being related to a grocer or a travelling salesman. More details (Daily Telegraph) 4. It took Education Secretary Michael Gove seven attempts to pass his driving test. More details (BBC Political Correspondent Gary O'Donoghue) 5. MPs drink more French wine than any other variety. More details (Daily Mail) 6. Housing in the borough of Elmbridge in Surrey is worth more than all the property in Glasgow. More details (The Financial Times) 7. Senior managers at Lego have to sit social media exams. More details (Brand Republic) 8. Kasabian's tour bus always contains a variety pack of Walkers crisps. More details (The Sun) 9. Wines with animals on the label are known as "critter wines" in the US. More details (The Guardian)) 10. Female hawksbill turtles can store sperm for 75 days. More details (Science Daily) Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 01 Feb 2013 15:20:25 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. Mice enjoy being massaged. More details (Scientific American) 2. Americans pronounce gifs as "jifs". More details 3. Jane Austen was paid an advance of £110 for Pride and Prejudice. More details 4. An adult is made up of around 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (7 octillion) atoms. More details (The Observer) 5. The House of Lords has a rifle range. More details (Daily Telegraph) 6. A storm is described as a "bomb" if pressure falls by 24mb in a 24-hour period. More details (The Times) 7. Prince Charles did not use the London Underground between 1986 and 2013. More details (Reuters) 8. Owls have smart bones in their necks. More details 9. Male birds become more attractive to females when they go grey. More details (The Times) 10. Formica, the mainstay of 1950s kitchen furniture, was so called because it was developed as a replacement for mica - an insulating material for car engines. More details (Financial Times) Seen a thing? Tell @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter using the hashtag #thingIdidntknowlastweek



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 25 Jan 2013 16:05:34 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. Dung beetles are guided by the Milky Way. More details 2. The Food Standards Agency has two classifications for burgers - standard and economy. More details 3. China has hippies who drop out of the rat race. More details (Financial Times) 4. Women started wearing high heels to look more like men. More details 5. Only two presidential inaugurations have forced indoors by the cold. More details 6. "Russian flu" got its name because of the Cold War rather than because it originated in Russia. More details 7. Fares on the London-Shoeburyness line have gone up the least since privatisation. More details 8. Fat drivers are more likely to die in crashes. More details (Daily Telegraph) 9. Dogs evolved from wolves that could digest starchy food. More details (Nature) 10. Women look their oldest every Wednesday at 3.30pm. More details (Daily Telegraph)



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 18 Jan 2013 17:20:17 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. Two per cent of Europeans lack the genes for smelly armpits. More details (Scientific American) 2. It is possible to beam an image (the Mona Lisa, in this case) to the Moon using a high-powered laser. More details (Huffington Post) 3. Russian soldiers don't wear socks. More details (NPR) 4. Horse-eating is called Hippophagy. More details 5. You can make beer out of Sugar Puffs. More details (The Guardian) 6. Overbites didn't become standard until everyone started eating with a knife and fork. More details (The Atlantic) 7. The East Midlands has a history of small to moderate earthquakes. More details 8. Swiss cheese plants suffer from stress. More details 9. Inflatable space capsules are as safe as metal ones. More details (New Scientist) 10. Trees that are more than 100m tall cannot grow leaves. More details (New Scientist)



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 11 Jan 2013 12:51:04 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. It's easier to pick wet things up with wrinkled fingers - suggesting an evolutionary reason for getting "prune fingers" in the bath. More details 2. An average passenger travelling on Western-built jetliners would have to take no fewer than 5.3m flights before being involved in an accident. More details (the Economist) 3. Every child under 10 in North Korea gets sweets for Kim Jong-un's birthday More details (the Journal) 4. One in 10 people have dropped their phone down a toilet at some point. More details 5. The inhabitants of the Greek island of Ikaria live on average 10 years longer than people in the rest of western Europe. More details 6. Air passengers' behaviour is subject to the laws of the country the plane is registered in, not the country the airline is based in. More details 7. It's illegal to enter a mannequin as a candidate in a British election. Probably. More details 8. There are languages that are entirely whistled. More details 9. The first journey on London's Tube in 1862 took two-and-a-half hours to cover the 18-minute route. More details 10. The US government could theoretically produce a $1tn coin to pay off its debts. More details



10 things we didn't know last week

Fri, 04 Jan 2013 17:45:13 +0000

Snippets from the week's news, sliced, diced and processed for your convenience. 1. The price of college textbooks in the US has risen faster than healthcare, house prices and inflation. More details (The Atlantic) 2. Four of the world's five oldest people live in Japan, according to a list of people whose birth date and survival have been confirmed. More details (Financial Times) 3. There are two firms in the world cloning polo ponies. More details (The Economist) 4. It would have taken 2.5m seagulls to lift James's giant peach into the air, not the 501 that Roald Dahl suggested. More details (The Guardian) 5. Supertasters who test baby food have twice as many taste buds as most people. More details (The Guardian) 6. Last year missed being the wettest on record by 6.6mm. More details (Metro) 7. The average individual in the US uses more than 20,000 sheets of toilet paper a year. More details (New Scientist) 8. The residents of Surrey account for one fifth of all library borrowing of EL James's Fifty Shades of Grey. More details (The Telegraph) 9. Hot drinks taste differently according to the cup colour. More details (Discovery News) 10. A gorilla can tightrope walk. More details (The Telegraph)