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Survival Current Events and Survival News from Brightsurf



Survival Current Events and Survival News Events, Discoveries and Articles from Brightsurf



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Forgoing chemo linked to worse survival in older patients with advanced colon cancer who had dementia

Fri, 22 Sep 17 00:00:00 -0700

A pre-existing diagnosis of dementia was associated with increased risk of death for older patients with advanced colon cancer; however, some of the effects of dementia on survival could be mediated by receipt of chemotherapy.



Mitochondria drive cell survival in times of need

Thu, 21 Sep 17 00:05:20 -0700

McGill University researchers have discovered a mechanism through which mitochondria, the energy factory of our body's cells, play a role in preventing cells from dying when the cells are deprived of nutrients - a finding that points to a potential target for next-generation cancer drugs.



Smoking negatively impacts long-term survival after breast cancer

Thu, 21 Sep 17 00:13:50 -0700

A new study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum finds that smoking negatively impacts long-term survival after breast cancer. Quitting smoking after diagnosis may reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer.



Genetic risk profile predicts survival for people with severe lung disease

Wed, 20 Sep 17 00:09:20 -0700

An international Yale-led research team has shown that a risk profile based on 52 genes accurately predicts survival for patients with a severe lung disease. If confirmed in further studies, the finding could transform the way patients are treated for the condition, which is on the rise in older adults.



How do human impacts on wetlands affect animals?

Wed, 20 Sep 17 00:10:30 -0700

A new Biological Reviews study provides a comprehensive assessment of how changes to wetlands affect animals, and the authors use their findings to provide recommendations for managing wetlands to maximise their biodiversity.



Cell-based therapy success could be boosted by new antioxidant

Tue, 19 Sep 17 00:15:20 -0700

Cell therapies being developed to treat a range of conditions could be improved by a chemical compound that aids their survival, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. Lab tests found that the man-made molecule -- a type of antioxidant -- helps to shield healthy cells from damage such as would be caused when they are transplanted into a patient during cell therapy.



NUS scientists combine antimalarial drug with light sensitive molecules for promising treatment of cancer

Mon, 18 Sep 17 00:03:40 -0700

NUS scientists discovered that a combination of artemisinin, which is a potent anti-malarial drug, and aminolaevulinic acid, which is a photosensitizer, could kill colorectal cancer cells and suppress tumor growth more effectively than administering artemisinin alone. This novel combination therapy could also have fewer side effects.



Does brain tissue regeneration depend on maturity of stem cells used for transplantation?

Wed, 13 Sep 17 00:07:40 -0700

New research has shown that the success of transplanting stem cells into the brain to regenerate tissue damaged by stroke may depend on the maturity of the neuronal precursor cells used for transplantation.



Researchers develop new strategy to target KRAS mutant cancer

Wed, 13 Sep 17 00:05:00 -0700

In a new study, published this month in Cancer Discovery, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that approximately half of lung and pancreatic cancers that originate with a KRAS mutation become addicted to the gene as they progress.



SLU researcher discovers how hibernating ribosomes wake up

Tue, 12 Sep 17 00:02:10 -0700

Saint Louis University scientist Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., has uncovered the way a bacterial ribosome moves from an inactive to an active form, and how that 'wake up call' is key to its survival.



Does health insurance status affect childhood cancer survival?

Mon, 11 Sep 17 00:04:40 -0700

A new study examines whether insurance status may affect survival in children diagnosed with cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest largely similar survival trends between privately insured children and those with Medicaid at diagnosis, with slight evidence for an increased risk of cancer death in children who were uninsured at diagnosis.



Combination targeted adjuvant therapy doubles relapse-free survival in stage III melanoma

Mon, 11 Sep 17 00:11:40 -0700

Combination targeted adjuvant therapy with dabrafenib and trametinib doubles relapse-free survival in patients with stage III BRAF-mutant melanoma, according to late-breaking results from the COMBI-AD trial presented today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.



Adjuvant nivolumab superior to ipilimumab in surgically resected stage III/IV melanoma

Mon, 11 Sep 17 00:11:30 -0700

Adjuvant nivolumab is superior to standard of care ipilimumab in patients with surgically resected stage III/IV melanoma who are at high risk of relapse, according to late-breaking results from the CheckMate 238 trial presented today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid and published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibody nivolumab led to better relapse-free survival, with fewer side effects than ipilimumab.



KEYNOTE-040 evaluates pembrolizumab in head and neck cancer

Mon, 11 Sep 17 00:11:20 -0700

Immunotherapy with the checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab may be a better option than standard treatments for patients whose head and neck cancer has spread, or recurred after an initial round of chemotherapy, according to results of the Keynote-040 trial presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.



Ramucirumab plus docetaxel improves progression-free survival in urothelial cancer

Sun, 10 Sep 17 00:09:30 -0700

Ramucirumab plus docetaxel improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer who have progressed on platinum-based chemotherapy, according to late-breaking results from the phase III RANGE trial presented today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid to be published in The Lancet.



Mature results favor pembrolizumab as second-line treatment for bladder cancer

Sun, 10 Sep 17 00:09:20 -0700

Mature results from the KEYNOTE-045 trial to be presented today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid have confirmed significantly longer survival in patients with advanced urothelial cancer who receive the checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab after initial chemotherapy, compared to an alternative chemotherapy regimen.



Durvalumab improves progression-free survival in stage III lung cancer

Sat, 09 Sep 17 00:07:30 -0700

Durvalumab improves progression-free survival in patients with locally advanced, unresectable stage III lung cancer, according to late-breaking results from the phase III PACIFIC trial presented today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.



Study confirms chemoradiation is best treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer

Sat, 09 Sep 17 00:07:20 -0700

A 14-year randomized trial in more than 600 patients has concluded that chemoradiation should remain the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. The findings are reported today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid. The trial demonstrated no improved disease-free survival with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery.



Osimertinib improves progression-free survival in patients with EGFR mutated lung cancer

Sat, 09 Sep 17 00:07:10 -0700

Osimertinib improves progression-free survival by 54% compared to standard first line therapy in patients with EGFR mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to late-breaking results from the FLAURA trial presented today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.



Lung cancer: Scientists find answer to resistance

Fri, 08 Sep 17 00:11:30 -0700

Scientists at the University of Southern Denmark have found a new strategy for overcoming the resistance, which many lung cancer patients develop towards a recent drug, which can arrest the growth of tumors.



Rucaparib boosts progression-free survival in BRCA mutant recurrent ovarian cancer

Fri, 08 Sep 17 00:12:20 -0700

Rucaparib maintenance therapy increases progression-free survival in BRCA mutant recurrent ovarian cancer by 77%, according to late-breaking results from the ARIEL3 trial reported today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.



Patients with high risk prostate cancer may benefit 'equally' from two new treatments

Fri, 08 Sep 17 00:14:00 -0700

Patients with high risk prostate cancer starting long-term hormone therapy may benefit from two new treatments, according to late-breaking results from the STAMPEDE trial presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.



New data confirms superiority of docetaxel based triplet therapy in gastric cancer

Fri, 08 Sep 17 00:13:50 -0700

The superiority of docetaxel based triplet therapy over standard care in patients with resectable esophago-gastric cancer has been confirmed in late-breaking results from the FLOT4 trial presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.



Young birds suffer in the city

Fri, 08 Sep 17 00:14:30 -0700

City life is tough for young birds. But if they survive their first year, they are less susceptible to the effects of stress, according to research from Lund University in Sweden.



Hepatocellular carcinoma: Resection vs. transplantation

Fri, 08 Sep 17 00:15:30 -0700

Liver transplantation is the gold standard for treating early hepatocellular cancers. Because of the lack of donors, this option is, however, available to a limited degree only. Curative liver resection is an alternative in this setting. Markus B. Schoenberg, Julian N. Bucher, and coauthors investigated whether liver resection can yield results that are comparable to those of liver transplantation.



Not adhering to recommended exams for severe narrowing of the aortic valve associated with increased heart failure

Wed, 06 Sep 17 00:13:20 -0700

Patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis who did not follow recommended guidelines for regular exams had poorer survival and were more likely to be hospitalized for heart failure, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.



Genetic alterations that make a type of brain cancer more aggressive were identified

Wed, 06 Sep 17 00:12:50 -0700

The study set out to identify the mechanisms that make astrocytomas so aggressive and to find ways to customize treatment to patient needs.



MIRO trial: 3-year outcomes favor laparoscopic surgery for esophageal cancer

Mon, 04 Sep 17 00:02:40 -0700

Patients requiring surgery for esophageal cancer fare better after undergoing a hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy compared to an open esophagectomy, according to long-term results of the MIRO trial to be presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.



ICON8 trial reaffirms standard dosing in ovarian cancer chemo

Sun, 03 Sep 17 00:08:50 -0700

European women with ovarian cancer can safely stick to the standard three-week dosing schedule for paclitaxel rather than boosting up to a weekly dose-dense regimen, according to results of the phase III ICON8 trial to be presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.



Study in early stage breast cancer shows that even small tumors can be aggressive

Sat, 02 Sep 17 00:08:10 -0700

Even small tumours can be aggressive, according to a study in patients with early stage breast cancer that will be presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid. Researchers found that nearly one in four small tumors were aggressive and patients benefited from chemotherapy. Aggressive tumors could be identified by a 70-gene signature.



Stressed lemurs have worse chances of survival

Thu, 31 Aug 17 00:01:20 -0700

High levels of hair cortisol -- a sign of long-term stress -- are associated with reduced survival in wild grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus), according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Ecology.



An island getaway: Why some Listeria strains survive good food hygiene standards

Wed, 30 Aug 17 00:05:00 -0700

researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna have now shown that certain Listeria strains -- figuratively speaking -- take refuge on an island. An 'islet' of two genes located in one area of the genome increases the bacteria's survival under alkaline and oxidative stress conditions. The researchers were able to identify the two genes as a functional unit termed a 'stress survival islet'. Understanding this genetic 'lifesaver' can help develop new strategies for food safety.



Cardiac arrests in black neighborhoods less likely to get CPR, defibrillation

Wed, 30 Aug 17 00:07:40 -0700

Compared to people who live in predominantly white neighborhoods, those who live in predominantly black areas are much less likely to receive CPR or defibrillation from a bystander when their heart suddenly stops beating while they are at home or out in the community.



Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treatment, outcomes varies by racial make-up of neighborhood

Wed, 30 Aug 17 00:07:30 -0700

Individuals who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in neighborhoods with higher percentages of black residents had lower rates of bystander CPR and defibrillator use and were less likely to survive compared to patients who experienced an OHCA in predominantly white neighborhoods, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.



Monkeys with Parkinson's disease benefit from human stem cells

Wed, 30 Aug 17 00:11:50 -0700

A team of Japanese neurosurgeons at the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Japan, report two new strategies to improve outcomes of iPS cell-based therapies for Parkinson's disease in monkey brains. The findings are a key step for patient recruitment of the first iPS cell-based therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases.



IFCT-0302 results question role of CT-scan in NSCLC post-surgery follow-up

Wed, 30 Aug 17 00:01:40 -0700

The optimal follow-up protocol for patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains elusive after results of the IFCT-0302 trial, to be presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid, did not show a difference in overall survival (OS) between patients who received computed tomography (CT) scans as part of their follow-up, and those who did not.



Discovery of drug combination: Overcoming resistance to targeted drugs for liver cancer

Wed, 30 Aug 17 00:05:20 -0700

A KAIST research team presented a novel method for improving medication treatment for liver cancer using systems biology, combining research from information technology and the life sciences.



Married patients with heart disease have better survival rates

Mon, 28 Aug 17 00:13:10 -0700

Marriage is a vital factor affecting the survival of patients who have had a heart attack, as well as the survival of patients with the most important risk factors, according to research presented today at ESC Congress.



Bag-mask ventilation fails to improve on endotracheal intubation in cardiac arrest (CAAM)

Mon, 28 Aug 17 00:00:10 -0700

Bag-mask ventilation fails to improve on endotracheal intubation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients, according to late-breaking results from the CAAM trial presented today in a Hot Line LBCT Session at ESC Congress.



UMass Amherst study of bee health finds no natural medicine in once-promising compound

Mon, 28 Aug 17 00:08:40 -0700

Ph.D. student Evan Palmer-Young and advisor evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler had reported in 2015 that a parasitic infection of bumble bees, Crithidia bombi, was reduced when the bees fed on anabasine, a natural alkaloid, in sugar water. They had hoped their finding was evidence that bees may use 'nature's medicine cabinet' to rid themselves of the intestinal parasite. But they report in the current issue of PLOS ONE that result was not repeated.



Automatic external defibrillators save lives in amateur sports and fitness centers

Sun, 27 Aug 17 00:09:50 -0700

Automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) save lives in amateur sports and fitness centers, according to research presented at ESC Congress today. The 18-year study found that survival from cardiac arrest reached 93 percent in centers equipped with an AED.



Survival of soil organisms is a wake-up call for biosecurity

Thu, 24 Aug 17 00:14:10 -0700

Tiny creatures in soil that attack plants have the ability to survive for at least three years stored in dry conditions, showed a recent AgResearch study. Furthermore, they were found to still be able to invade plant roots. The research article, published in the open access journal Neobiota, provides new insights into the biosecurity threats posed by passenger travel and trade between countries and tests various methods for nematodes detection.



Newly developed nomograms provide accurate predictions for patients with oropharyngeal cancer

Mon, 21 Aug 17 00:00:30 -0700

NRG Oncology researchers recently developed and validated a nomogram that can predict 2-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with local-regionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated primarily with radiation-based therapy. This nomogram was developed with data from clinical trials NRG Oncology/RTOG 0129 and 0522. Results were published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology on Aug. 4, 2017.



Heart Safe program boosts CPR and AED use in participating communities

Mon, 21 Aug 17 00:10:50 -0700

Allina Health researchers say individuals in Heart Safe Communities who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) are four times more likely to receive chest compressions (CPR) and twice as likely to have automated external defibrillators (AEDs) placed by bystanders and first responders before EMS personnel arrive, according to a Minnesota study published in the August issue of the journal, Resuscitation.



Recently discovered brain chemical 'NPGL' controls appetite and body fat composition

Thu, 17 Aug 17 00:01:20 -0700

NPGL, a recently discovered protein involved in brain signalling, has been found to increase fat storage by the body -- even when on a low-calorie diet. In addition, NPGL was shown to increase appetite in response to high caloric food intake, suggesting that perhaps we shouldn't feel so guilty about gorging on junk food from time to time.



Lab tests show molecule appears to spur cell death in tumors, inflammation

Thu, 17 Aug 17 00:09:30 -0700

A drug-like molecule developed by Duke Health researchers appears to intercede in an inflammatory response that is at the center of a variety of diseases, including some cancers, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease.



New Pathology Atlas maps genes in cancer to accelerate progress in personalized medicine

Thu, 17 Aug 17 00:11:10 -0700

A new Pathology Atlas is launched today with an analysis of all human genes in all major cancers showing the consequence of their corresponding protein levels for overall patient survival. The difference in expression patterns of individual cancers observed in the study strongly reinforces the need for personalized cancer treatment based on precision medicine.



Specialists make breakthrough in the treatment of anal cancer

Wed, 16 Aug 17 00:01:00 -0700

Specialists at The Christie and The University of Manchester have made a breakthrough which could potentially improve detection and treatment of anal cancer, as well as have wider implications for other cancers.



How decision-making habits influence the breast cancer treatments women consider

Tue, 15 Aug 17 00:01:10 -0700

A new study finds that more than half of women with early stage breast cancer considered an aggressive type of surgery to remove both breasts. The way women generally approach big decisions, combined with their values, impacts what breast cancer treatment they consider, the study also found.



'Inefficient' sailing fleet keeps oyster fishery alive

Mon, 14 Aug 17 00:12:10 -0700

Oyster stocks in a Cornish fishery are sustained thanks to 'inefficient' traditional fishing methods, new research suggests.