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Preview: Brightsurf Science News :: Invasive Species News

Invasive Species Current Events and Invasive Species News from Brightsurf



Invasive Species Current Events and Invasive Species News Events, Discoveries and Articles from Brightsurf



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Species may appear deceptively resilient to climate change

Wed, 22 Nov 17 00:07:50 -0800

Natural habitats play a vital role in helping other plants and animals resist heat stresses ramping up with climate change -- at least until the species they depend on to form those habitats become imperiled.



Felling pines: Doing it sooner rather than later is better for fynbos

Wed, 22 Nov 17 00:11:20 -0800

Here's some advice for landowners wanting to remove pine trees in the hope of seeing fynbos plants on their properties again: do so before the trees have grown there for more than 30 years. The longer they wait, the less likely the chances that any fynbos seeds will be left in the soil to sprout successfully, according to researchers from Stellenbosch University and the City of Cape Town, in the South African Journal of Botany.



Droplet explosion by shock waves, relevant to nuclear medicine

Wed, 22 Nov 17 00:11:00 -0800

In a study published in EPJ D, Eugene Surdutovich from Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, USA and colleagues have examined the possibility of observing the multi-fragmentation of small droplets due to shock waves initiated by ions that passed through them. The discovery of ion-induced shock waves will significantly affect our understanding of how radiation damage occurs in biomolecules due to ions.



Meningococcal vaccine could protect against 91 percent of targeted bacterial strains

Wed, 22 Nov 17 00:04:00 -0800

Up to 91 percent of bacterial strains causing a common type of invasive serogroup B meningococcal disease in children and young adults are likely to be covered by a four-component vaccine called MenB-4C (Bexsero), according to laboratory studies conducted by investigators at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and at GlaxoSmithKline, manufacturers of the vaccine. The work was published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal from the American Society for Microbiology.



Ribbed mussels could help improve urban water quality

Wed, 22 Nov 17 00:02:00 -0800

Ribbed mussels can remove nitrogen and other excess nutrients from an urban estuary and could help improve water quality in other urban and coastal locations, according to a study in New York City's Bronx River. The findings, published in Environmental Science and Technology, are part of long-term efforts to improve water quality in the Bronx River Estuary.



Camponotini ant species have their own distinct microbiomes

Wed, 22 Nov 17 00:06:10 -0800

Camponotini ant species have their own distinct microbiomes and the bacteria may also vary by developmental stage, according to a study published Nov. 22, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Manuela Oliveira Ramalho from the Universidade Estadual Paulista 'Júlio de Mesquita Filho,' Brazil, and colleagues.



Research points to diagnostic test for top cause of liver transplant in kids

Wed, 22 Nov 17 00:05:50 -0800

Biliary atresia is the most common cause of liver transplants for children in the United States. Researchers report in Science Translational Medicine finding a strong biomarker candidate that could be used for earlier diagnosis and lifesaving treatments that could avoid more invasive procedures like liver transplant. A research team led by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center identified molecular markers of the disease in blood samples that accurately diagnosed the condition with greater than 90 percent sensitivity.



Bowhead whales come to Cumberland Sound in Nunavut to exfoliate

Wed, 22 Nov 17 00:04:50 -0800

Aerial drone footage of bowhead whales in Canada's Arctic has revealed that the large mammals molt and use rocks to rub off dead skin.



Penn study identifies new malaria parasites in wild bonobos

Tue, 21 Nov 17 00:04:40 -0800

Malaria parasites, although widespread among wild chimpanzees and gorillas, have not been detected in bonobos, a chimp cousin. Although the researchers saw evidence of a new malaria species in bonobos, it was limited to one small area of their range. This work helps the hunt for biological loopholes to potentially exploit the life history of ape pathogens to better understand how they cross over to humans.



Eight-year research stretch yields treatise on tapeworms along with hundreds of new species

Tue, 21 Nov 17 00:13:30 -0800

A special publication titled



New discovery: Common jellyfish is actually two species

Tue, 21 Nov 17 00:03:20 -0800

UD professor and alum discover sea nettle jellyfish found in Rehoboth and Chesapeake Bay is actually two species.



Climate change models of bird impacts pass the test

Tue, 21 Nov 17 00:09:40 -0800

A major study looking at changes in where UK birds have been found over the past 40 years has validated the latest climate change models being used to forecast impacts on birds and other animals.



Tiger bones? Lion bones? An almost extinct cycad? On-the-spot DNA checks at ports of entry

Mon, 20 Nov 17 00:00:50 -0800

Wildlife species are going extinct faster than humankind can reliably keep track of. Meanwhile, wildlife crime evolves quickly, with new tricks fueling a lucrative illegal global trade. As a result, customs and other port-of-entry officials confronted with unidentifiable bits of animals and plants need to make rapid decisions based on reliable information. LifeScanner LAB-IN-A-BOX, a portable DNA barcoding lab can serve as a new tool for rapid on-site species identification, adding to law enforcement's arsenal.



Ancient fish scales and vertebrate teeth share an embryonic origin

Mon, 20 Nov 17 00:00:40 -0800

Latest findings support the theory that teeth in the animal kingdom evolved from the jagged scales of ancient fish, the remnants of which can be seen today embedded in the skin of sharks and skate.



Twisted sex allows mirror-image snails to mate face-to-face, research finds

Mon, 20 Nov 17 00:03:40 -0800

A study led by the University of Nottingham has found that differently-coiled types of Japanese land snails should in fact be considered a single species, because -- against all odds - they are sometimes able to mate, a result which has implications for the classification of other snails.



Oncotarget: Researchers identify a potential molecular trigger for invasiveness in prostate cancer cells

Mon, 20 Nov 17 00:06:00 -0800

A small protein modification can trigger the aggressive migratory and invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, according to new research published on the cover of Oncotarget. The findings give greater insight into how cancers can move from one location in the body to another, and could help develop more effective therapies in the future. Editorial by Xin Ye and Robert A. Weinberg can be found online.



The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

Fri, 17 Nov 17 00:04:20 -0800

Leipzig. Forests fulfil numerous important functions, and do so particularly well if they are rich in different species of trees. In addition, forest managers do not have to decide on the provision of solely one function, such as wood production or nature conservation: several services provided by forest ecosystems can be improved at the same time. These are the results of two studies led by scientists from Leipzig University and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), and published in Ecology Letters.



No more deer in the headlight: Study finds large mammals do use road crossing structures

Fri, 17 Nov 17 00:07:10 -0800

A pilot study finds that large mammals are more likely to use wildlife crossing structures than move past a random location in the surrounding habitat. Animal movement also varied between crossing structures in different locations, suggesting that location might be more important than design. These findings are a first step towards a better understanding of the effectiveness of wildlife crossing structures.



Warmer water signals change for Scotland's shags

Fri, 17 Nov 17 00:08:20 -0800

An increasingly catholic diet among European shags at one of Scotland's best-studied breeding colonies has been linked to long-term climate change and may have important implications for Scotland's seabirds.



A sub-desert savanna spread across Madrid fourteen million years ago

Fri, 17 Nov 17 00:09:30 -0800

The current landscape of Madrid city and its vicinity was really different 14 million years ago. A semi-desert savanna has been inferred for the centre of the Iberian Peninsula in the middle Miocene. This ecosystem was characterised by a very arid tropical climatic regime with up to ten months of drought per year, according to a recent paper published in PLOS ONE. Scientists reached such conclusions after comparing mammal faunal with Africa and Asia ones



Study analyzes mutations in cerebrospinal fluid in lung cancer with brain metastases

Fri, 17 Nov 17 00:09:50 -0800

Researchers have explored the analysis of mutations in cerebrospinal fluid of lung cancer patients with brain metastases in a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. Tumor tissue from brain metastasis is difficult to obtain and therefore less invasive methods are needed to identify and monitor the presence of known actionable mutations.



eDNA tool detects invasive clams before they become a nuisance

Fri, 17 Nov 17 00:11:10 -0800

When seeking a cure for a disease, early detection is often the key. The same is true for eliminating invasive species. Identifying their presence in a lake before they are abundant is vital. A recent University of Illinois study successfully used environmental DNA to detect invasive clams in California and Nevada lakes. Researchers believe this tool can help identify pests before they become a problem.



Micro-spectroscopy opens new routes for diagnostics
In recent years, optics and photonics, and in particular the microspectroscopic techniques, have demonstrated their effectiveness for the materials analysis. The work 'Non-contact mechanical and chemical analysis of single living cells by micro-spectroscopic techniques' which will appear in the journal