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Comments on: The Solar System:Podcasts



Comments on MetaFilter post The Solar System:Podcasts



Published: Sat, 25 Nov 2006 04:34:07 -0800

Last Build Date: Sat, 25 Nov 2006 04:34:07 -0800

 



The Solar System:Podcasts

Sat, 25 Nov 2006 04:29:40 -0800

Astronomy 161 - an introduction to Solar System Astronomy. These are a set of lectures in progress now at Ohio State University. All materials are available on line - audio resources (direct or podcast through iTunes), movies and lecture notes. If you are interested in where you live, these beautifully delivered lectures are excellent.



By: grahamwell

Sat, 25 Nov 2006 04:34:07 -0800

A mention also to Astro 10P - an Introduction to General Astronomy from UC Berkley. They are much wider ranging but they lack the marvellous clarity of Professor Pogge.



By: Mitrovarr

Sat, 25 Nov 2006 08:05:10 -0800

Anyone know if there are any more advanced classes hiding online? I didn't have the math or physics to get past General Astronomy when I went to college, but I would have liked to have taken some Intro to Astrophysics courses, and maybe some Cosmology.



By: The Tensor

Sat, 25 Nov 2006 09:05:57 -0800

Hey, I know that name! CalTech used to have (and maybe still has) a series of introductory classes on Saturdays for local middle- and high-school students. I took a introductory astronomy class from Prof. Pogge way back in 1982 or so, when he was a student at CalTech and I was in the seventh grade. I still remember the mnemonic he taught us for the spectral classes of the stars: On Bad Afternoons, Fermented Grapes Keep Mrs. Richard Nixon Smiling. It's always nice to see a local boy make good!



By: Twang

Sat, 25 Nov 2006 12:36:54 -0800

Good clear development. Thanks for the pointer! 1. Is there some other name for what he terms the "Great Interruption" (Unit 3)? (5th century fall of Rome to 11th century rediscovery of Classical knowledge?) "The Big Stupid" seems apropos. I'm thinking of the loss of technical knowledge represented in the Antikythera Mechanism, and the "Archimedes palimpsest", for two well-known examples. 2. Timely of him to note that Islam was responsible for maintaining Classical knowledge during that period: "the ancient classical learning was to be nurtured and extended by Islamic society while most of contemporary Europe fell into a kind of intellectual slumber."



By: neuron

Sat, 25 Nov 2006 16:04:53 -0800

Anyone know if there are any more advanced classes hiding online? Try this.



By: neuron

Sat, 25 Nov 2006 16:08:25 -0800

I'm intriged by the Wikibooks Astrophysics text.



By: luckypozzo

Mon, 27 Nov 2006 13:51:18 -0800

Wow. Thanks, grahamwell.