Subscribe: SCCM RSS News
http://www.sccm.org/documents/sccmRSS1.xml
Preview: SCCM RSS News

SCCM RSS News



SCCM Latest News



Published: Mon, 8 Jul 2013 08:39:58 -0500

Last Build Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2013 08:40:15 -0500

Copyright: Society of Critical Care Medicine
 



Clopidogrel in Infants with Systemic-to-Pulmonary-Artery Shunts

Mon, 8 Jul 2013 08:39:58 -0500

Medications approved for adults often have additional uses in pediatric patients. Such is the case -- as described by Wessel and colleagues -- for clopidogrel, an agent that blocks the P2Y12 component of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors on the surface of platelets. ADP receptors prevent the activation of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor complex, thereby reducing aggregation. Clopidogrel is used most commonly as a prophylactic antiplatelet therapy in adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, but is increasingly employed in the pediatric population, particularly in those with cardiac disease. Pediatric cardiovascular practitioners are using clopidogrel (along with the standard aspirin) to prevent the thrombosis of systemic-to-pulmonary-artery shunts in patients with complex cyanotic heart disease; however, the safety and efficacy of this practice have never been looked at prospectively. In the June 20 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, investigators created a multicenter, event-driven trial to evaluate clopidogrel's effect on infants. A total of 906 subjects were enrolled, 467 in the clopidogrel group and 439 in the placebo group. The authors found that adding clopidogrel to conventional therapies (i.e., aspirin) did not affect mortality from any cause or shunt-thrombosis-related morbidity. Although no statistically significant differences were detected in total subjects with adverse events, the authors found more neurologic events in the clopidogrel group versus the placebo group. Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal.



HES Solutions Warrant Additional Box Warning

Mon, 8 Jul 2013 08:39:42 -0500

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has found data that indicate an increased risk of mortality and renal injury requiring renal replacement therapy in critically ill adult patients treated with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions. HES solutions are used for the treatment of hypovolemia when plasma volume expansion is indicated. After a public workshop, the FDA concluded that HES solutions should not be used in this patient population, and a Boxed Warning to include the risk of mortality and severe renal injury is warranted. In addition, the FDA reviewed a meta-analysis of studies conducted in patients undergoing open heart surgery in association with cardiopulmonary bypass and determined that an additional warning about excessive bleeding was needed in the Warnings and Precautions Section of the package insert. The FDA has created a list of recommendations for patients and healthcare providers to consider before use of HES solutions.



Critical Connections Features Congress Review

Mon, 8 Jul 2013 08:39:23 -0500

The June/July issue of Critical Connections features review articles from the 42nd Critical Care Congress: Surviving Sepsis Campaign: 2012 Guidelines Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: Improving the Future of ICU Patients Late Breaker: The Latest in Critical Care Research Strategies for Preventing and Treating Pain, Agitation and Delirium in Clinical Practice Maximizing Clinical and Surgical Outcomes with Immunonutrition Claim CE credit by ordering the Congress Review at the SCCM store at www.sccm.org/congressreview13. There is no cost for this transaction. The latest issue also offers a preview of the 43rd Critical Care Congress, to be held January 9 to 13, 2014, in San Francisco, California, USA. Check out our pre-Congress educational sessions, popular events and sightseeing activities, as well as information on hotels and travel.



Discounted Rates for Adult MCCBRC Ends Soon

Mon, 8 Jul 2013 08:39:04 -0500

Discounted registration rates for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) upcoming Adult Multiprofessional Critical Care Board Review Course (MCCBRC) are only available until Wednesday, July 17, 2013. Register online today using your Customer ID (INSERT_CUSTOM02) and password, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888, to take advantage of special pricing. The 2013 Adult MCCBRC will be held at the JW Marriott, August 10 to 14, in Washington, DC, USA. Reserve your housing by Wednesday, July 10, 2013, to receive low rates on your hotel stay. Reservations made after this day may not receive SCCM’s discounted hotel rate. Led by founding directors Joseph E. Parrillo, MD, MCCM, and Henry Masur, MD, FCCM, the Adult MCCBRC offers four-and-a-half days of expert guidance on the core areas of critical care medicine. Whether you need to certify, recertify, or simply review, this course provides an excellent update and thorough overview of the field.



Webcast Will Explore the Impact of Coding for Sepsis

Mon, 8 Jul 2013 08:38:35 -0500

Coding for severe sepsis and septic shock is a complex, highly nuanced skill that has wide implications for generating data to support the effort to reduce mortality from sepsis. Too often, coding is not clinically congruent with the incidence or severity of sepsis, in turn, providing misleading reports on the metrics of an institution’s patient population. The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) webcast, Sepsis: Impact of Coding Upon Metrics, will take place on July 11, 2013, at 2 p.m. Central Time. Paul Evans, RHIA, CCS, CCDS, CCS-P, will provide insight into how actions by all members of the sepsis team affect the generation of valuable data from coding. Topics to be covered include: Requirements by physicians that support accurate data collection Impact of key terms on risk-adjusted mortality data How sepsis should be coded Tips to support sepsis coding This event, part of SCCM’s Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) webcast series, provides strategies for successful application of the SSC guidelines. An initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and SCCM, the SSC aims to improve the management, diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in order to reduce its high mortality rate. Register online today. Registration is complimentary for all participants. No CME is available. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Programs are supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation



Prone Positioning Found to Improve Survival in Severe ARDS

Mon, 24 Jun 2013 08:25:25 -0500

In two meta-analyses and one previous observational study, prone positioning was associated with improved survival for patients with severely hypoxemic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the findings in these studies were in contradistinction to previously conducted randomized trials. To further evaluate the effectiveness of early prone positioning in severe ARDS, Guerin and colleagues from the PROSEVA Study Group designed a randomized controlled trial comparing early application of prone positioning versus supine positioning for patients with severe ARDS. Results were published in a recent issue of The New England Journal of Medicine...



Has Your Team Improved Family-Centered Care in the ICU?

Mon, 24 Jun 2013 08:25:05 -0500

Are you part of an intensive care unit team that not only commits itself to securing the highest quality care for its patients but also shows compassion toward each patient's family in innovative ways? If so, consider applying for the Family-Centered Care Innovation Award. This honor is awarded to a unit or program that demonstrates novel, effective methods of providing care to critically ill and injured patients and their families. The selected team will receive a commemorative plaque and one free registration to the 43rd Critical Care Congress. The deadline to submit an application is August 1, 2013. For more information, email Patient and Family Support Committee Staff Partner Amanda Cozza at acozza@sccm.org...



Sessions on Delirium, Nutrition and More Added to LearnICU.org

Mon, 24 Jun 2013 08:24:47 -0500

Several videos featuring the industry-supported sessions from the Society's Critical Care Congress in San Juan, Puerto Rico, are now available free of charge at LearnICU.org. Access these presentations and earn continuing education credit: Strategies for Preventing and Treating Pain, Agitation & Delirium in Clinical Practice- Supported by an educational grant from Hospira, Inc. Maximizing Clinical and Surgical Outcomes with Immunonutrition- Supported by an educational grant from Nestlé Nutrition, Inc. Improving Outcomes in the Neurological Critical Care Patient with Decreased Sodium Levels- Supported by an educational grant from Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. Recognition, Identification, and Management of Acquired Coagulopathy in Critically Ill Patients- Supported by an educational grant from CSL Behring Defining the Goals of Resuscitation – Supported by an educational grant from Edwards Lifesciences Practical Application of Nutrition Studies – Supported by an educational grant from Abbott Nutrition



Participate in an International Study on Mechanical Ventilation

Mon, 24 Jun 2013 08:24:31 -0500

The International Observational Study Investigators are looking at mechanical ventilation (MV) discontinuation practices internationally in intensive care units (ICU). The goal of the study is to characterize practice variation in weaning critically ill adults from invasive MV, as well as the influence of selected discontinuation strategies on important outcomes. Each ICU will be asked to collect data on at least 10 consecutive discontinuation events – one event (e.g., tracheostomy, direct extubation, initial successful spontaneous breathing trial) per patient receiving invasive ventilation for at least 24 hours and all patients who die before any attempt at MV discontinuation. Those interested in participating should email ioswean@smh.ca.



Webcast on GRADE Methodology for SSC Guidelines

Mon, 24 Jun 2013 08:24:13 -0500

The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology is based on a sequential assessment of the quality of evidence, followed by the benefits, risks, burden, and cost, leading to development and grading of a management recommendation. The Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) webcast, GRADE Methodology, will take place on Thursday, June 27, 2013, from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Central Time. Mark E. Nunnally, MD, FCCM, will provide information on the GRADE system engaged for the 2012 Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines. Topics to be covered include: Translating evidence into graded recommendations Identify features that reduce or increase the quality of evidence Appraising clinical data to determine the quality of evidence Integrating the quality of evidence for an intervention with its costs, and the balance between desirable and undesirable effects and values to determine the strength of a recommendation This event, part of SCCM's webcast series, provides strategies for successful application of the SSC guidelines. An initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and SCCM, the SSC aims to improve the management, diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in order to reduce its high mortality rate. Register online today. Registration is complimentary for all participants. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888...



Attend WFSICCM’s 11th Congress in South Africa

Mon, 24 Jun 2013 08:23:57 -0500

The World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine will hold its 11th Congress, August 28 to September 1, 2013, in Durban, South Africa. Pre-registration for the conference will be available until August, 20, 2013. After this date, only on-site registration will be accepted. Please refer to www.criticalcare2013.com for additional information about travel and hotel accommodations...



Vision Grant Now Includes New Categories for Research Projects

Mon, 24 Jun 2013 08:23:34 -0500

Through generous funding from the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), a Vision Grant of $50,000 is offered to support member researchers. Basic, translational and clinical research submissions are encouraged. Submit your application by August 31, 2013, to be considered for grant support in 2014. Eligible research should focus on one or more of the following areas of investigation: Basic research: Expand our understanding of complex critical illness processes. Bench to bedside: Improve patient care by translating basic scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for critical care patients. Clinical outcomes: Advance our understanding of patient outcomes and continuous improvement practices. For more information or to download the application, visit www.sccm.org/VisionGrant.



Can Metabolomics Help Diagnose Pediatric Sepsis?

Tue, 11 Jun 2013 08:28:02 -0500

Metabolomics is a relatively new technology that involves the measurement of an organism's global metabolic response to some physiologic stress. The study of this technology is gaining momentum, as measurement of a person's metabolic profile in easily accessible biological fluids can help distinguish disease states from non-disease states earlier. Thus, patients could receive appropriate therapies earlier, which can improve outcomes in cases such as pneumonia and sepsis. In the May 2013 issue of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the authors used 1H proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure the concentrations of 58 different metabolites in serum samples taken from 140 pediatric subjects from 11 different institutions. By first applying principal component analysis and then partial least squares discriminant analysis methods to the data, the authors were able to successfully delineate the metabolic scores of healthy control subjects from systemic inflamatory response syndrome (SIRS) and septic groups on a 3-D score scatter plot. Although there was some overlap between the SIRS and septic groups, overall, the studied groups were well clustered. The authors discovered that by measuring these metabolites and applying these statistical methods, they could more accurately predict mortality rates compared to the conventionally used physiologically-based Pediatric Risk of Mortality III-Acute Physiology Score model or procalcitonin levels. Further study with a larger cohort of patients is needed, as it may lead to even better delineation of metabolic profiles and diagnoses. Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal...



Major Grant Will Support Patient-Centered Outcomes Research

Tue, 11 Jun 2013 08:27:45 -0500

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) has been awarded a grant in support of its new Project DisPatCH -- Disseminating Patient-Centered Outcomes Research to Healthcare Professionals. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) announced that SCCM is the recipient of this grant, marking the first time the Society has received federal funding in support of a program. Project DisPatCH, under the leadership of SCCM members Ruth Kleinpell, PhD, RN-CS, FCCM, and Timothy Buchman, MD, MCCM, aims to help fulfill the goals of the AHRQ by developing and distributing resources for critical care clinicians focused on patient-centered outcomes research over the grant's three-year period. The AHRQ supports this type of research to improve the quality, effectiveness, accessibility and cost-effectiveness of healthcare in the United States...



Access the Latest Clinical Practice Guidelines

Tue, 11 Jun 2013 08:27:28 -0500

Get the information you need, whenever and wherever it's convenient for you. The Society of Critical Care Medicine's ICU Guidelines app provides summaries of select American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) guidelines for quick reference as well as an opportunity to download PDFs of full guidelines to your device. Developed by the ACCM and approved by the Board of Regents and SCCM Council, these guidelines provide the essential recommendations, protocols and parameters for intensive care unit activities...



Recognize Teaching and Clinical Practice Excellence

Tue, 11 Jun 2013 08:27:12 -0500

Congratulations to Margaret Wojnar, MD, who received the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) 2013 Dr. Joseph and Rae Brown Award. As Director of Medical Critical Care, Co-Chair of the Interdisciplinary Critical Care Council, and Professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania, Wojnar provides outstanding leadership and education to fellows and residents. A member of the SCCM Pennsylvania Chapter since 2006, she served as its president from 2009 to 2012, contributing to the groups growth and success...



Registration Open for the Critical Care Event of the Year

Tue, 11 Jun 2013 08:26:54 -0500

Registration is now open for the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) 43rd Critical Care Congress, to be held January 9 to 13, 2014, in San Francisco, California, USA. The Society's annual Congress is the largest multiprofessional critical care event of the year and the "City by the Bay" is the ideal setting to combine creative and inspirational ideas for the critical care field. This five-day event will provide outstanding networking opportunities and innovative learning experiences, highlighting the most up-to-date, evidence-based developments in critical care medicine...



Board Review: Discount Registration Deadline Approaching

Tue, 11 Jun 2013 08:26:39 -0500

The deadline to receive early-bird rates for the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) Adult Multiprofessional Critical Care Board Review Course (MCCBRC) is Wednesday, June 19, 2013. Led by an internationally recognized faculty, this four-and-a-half-day course will provide the most comprehensive review in the diagnosis, monitoring and management of critically ill patients. Attendees benefit by fulfilling continuing medical education requirements and gaining accurate assessments of their knowledge in critical care. The course also provides an excellent update for any critical care professional seeking the most current review of the field...



Take Advantage of Discounted Ultrasound Registration

Tue, 11 Jun 2013 08:26:20 -0500

Register for the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) Fundamentals of Critical Care Ultrasound and Advanced Ultrasound courses by Wednesday, June 19, 2013, to take advantage of discounted registration rates. In the evaluation and treatment of acute illness and injury, every second makes a difference. Focused ultrasound examinations in the critical care setting have become an extension of the clinical assessment because of their rapid, precise detection capabilities. Assist in the immediate management of patients by learning or enhancing point-of-care ultrasound skills. The Fundamentals course will be held August 7 and 8, 2013, at the JW Marriott in Washington, DC, USA. The Advanced course will follow on August 9, 2013. Make your hotel reservation by July 10, 2013, to receive SCCM's discounted rate.



Glutamine and Antioxidants for Patients with Multiple Organ Failure

Thu, 16 May 2013 14:23:38 -0500

Critically ill patients are at risk for significant oxidative stress; however, several small analyses have proposed that supplementation with glutamine, with or without antioxidants, may improve survival. Heyland and colleagues from the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group conducted an international, multicenter study to test the hypothesis that 28-day mortality in critically ill adults would be reduced by supplementation with glutamine, with or without antioxidants. Results were published in a recent issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.



Wear Blue Tomorrow to Support Critical Care

Thu, 16 May 2013 14:23:25 -0500

Be sure to wear blue on Friday, May 17, to show your support for National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month (NCCARM). There is still time to mark this year’s NCCARM, and the Society offers several simple ideas for recognition of the critical care team. Some teams choose to offer tours of the intensive care unit to other hospital staff, while others organize educational symposia or invite former patients and their families back to the unit. No matter how you choose to celebrate, we hope you post your NCCARM photos and stories to the SCCM Facebook page.



SCCM Congratulates Members on Research Awards

Thu, 16 May 2013 14:23:08 -0500

The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has approved 51 new awards, totaling $88.6 million over three years, to fund patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research projects under the first four areas of its National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda. The Society of Critical Care Medicine congratulates the following members for their award-winning projects related to critical care: Christopher Ethan Cox, MD, MPH - Improving Psychological Distress Among Critical Illness Survivors and Their Informal Caregivers J. Randall Curtis, MD, MPH - Health System Intervention to Improve Communication About End-of-Life Care for Vulnerable Patients Elliott R. Haut, MD - Preventing Venous Thromboembolism: Empowering Patients and Enabling Patient-Centered Care via Health Information Technology Rebecca Aslakson, MD - Utilizing Advance Care Planning Videos to Empower Perioperative Cancer Patients and Families Erik Paul Hess, MD, MS - Shared Decision Making in the Emergency Department: The Chest Pain Choice Trial; and Shared Decision Making in Parents of Children with Head Trauma: Head CT Choice Debra Kay Moser, DNSc, RN - Reducing Health Disparities in Appalachians with Multiple Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Rachel Berger, MD, MPH - Using the Electronic Medical Record to Improve Outcomes and Decrease Disparities in Screening for Child Physical Abuse We congratulate these members for their dedication to evolving research and to the field of critical care medicine.



Critical Connections Focuses on Sepsis Management

Thu, 16 May 2013 14:22:48 -0500

The April/May issue of Critical Connections focuses on managing sepsis in the intensive care unit, highlighting various strategies, from the use of early goal-directed therapy to implementing the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guideline recommendations and bundles. Find the following articles: Surviving Sepsis Campaign Enters Second Decade with Dynamic Plans Rapid Identification of Sepsis: The Value of Screening Tools Early Goal-Directed Therapy: Contemporary Care and Controversies Ongoing Clinical Trials in Sepsis Challenges in Pediatric Sepsis



Apply for ANZICS New Fellowship Program

Thu, 16 May 2013 14:22:32 -0500

The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) has instituted a fellowship program, Intensive Care Global Rising Star Programme, in support of innovative and productive research. ANZICS will be awarding three travel fellowships for attending their 38th Annual Scientific Meeting, to be held October 25 to 27, 2013, in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. One fellowship will be awarded to a clinician/scientist from each of the following regions: America (USA, Canada and South America), Europe (including United Kingdom and Ireland) and Asia. Award recipients will have the opportunity to present an overview of their past and ongoing research activities during a dedicated symposium. Travel expenses (to the value of $3,000), accommodation and registration costs for the recipients will be covered.



Webcast Highlights Third Edition of SSC Guidelines

Thu, 16 May 2013 14:22:14 -0500

Severe sepsis and septic shock are major healthcare problems, affecting millions of people around the world each year, killing one in four (and often more), and increasing in incidence. Similar to polytrauma, acute myocardial infarction, or stroke, the speed and appropriateness of therapy administered in the initial hours after severe sepsis develops are likely to influence outcome. During the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) webcast, What's New in the Third Edition of the SSC Guidelines?, R. Phillip Dellinger, MD, MCCM, and Christa A. Schorr, RN, MSN, FCCM, will discuss the additions to the latest update of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines and the rationale for the changes. The webcast will be held Wednesday, May 29, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Central Time.



Effect of Cardiac Function and Systemic Vascular Resistance in Premature Infants

Fri, 3 May 2013 09:01:48 -0500

Permissive hypercapnia is a well-accepted ventilator strategy for the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome as well as other causes of respiratory failure, such as the respiratory distress syndrome seen in premature infants. Multiple studies have demonstrated that both myocardial contractility and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) decrease with hypercapnic acidosis, the ultimate effect being that cardiac function is maintained or even augmented. The effects of hypercapnic acidosis on cardiac function in the preterm infant have not been elucidated. In a prospective observational study, published in the May issue of The Journal of Pediatrics, the authors analyzed paired blood gasses and echocardiograms from 29 hemodynamically stable preterm infants at 30 weeks gestation.



Be Critical Care Aware in May

Fri, 3 May 2013 09:01:27 -0500

During National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month (NCCARM), be sure to share your celebration ideas and stories with the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and your colleagues. This month-long celebration allows critical care team members to exemplify their dedication to patient care while creating more awareness of this demanding, life-saving practice...



Recognizing Nursing Excellence

Fri, 3 May 2013 09:01:07 -0500

Barbara McLean, MN, RN, CCRN, FNP, FCCM, received this year’s Norma J. Shoemaker Award for Critical Care Nursing Excellence in recognition of her dedication to critical care as both a clinician and educator. As a critical care specialist at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, McLean exemplifies excellence in critical care nursing through her tireless efforts as a patient care provider and advocate. A well-known educator, she has been invited to speak all over the world including the Philippines, Saudi Arabia and Spain. She has been active in Nursing Section leadership and has served on numerous Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) committees. In 2001, McLean became the 20th nurse to be inducted as a Fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine. Additionally, she was elected to an at-large seat on SCCM’s Council in 2004, then re-elected in 2007. Her care for the critically ill and injured are evidenced through her service after Hurricane Katrina and again in Haiti after the devastating earthquake; she has made more than eight trips back to Haiti in continued support of those in need. In recognition of her contributions, SCCM presented her with the Distinguished Service Award in 2011...



Call for CCM Editor Applicants

Fri, 3 May 2013 09:00:49 -0500

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is seeking an Editor-in-Chief for its journal Critical Care Medicine. This position requires a commitment to publication excellence and timely but fair editorial decision, upholding and enhancing the journal’s quality and reputation. To this end, the Editor-in-Chief is responsible for directing the journal’s editorial board, including the Associate Editors, and the Editor of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, to ensure they are following all appropriate procedures and working within the journals’ defined budgets. Job responsibilities include maintaining and establishing editorial policies, ensuring the content, quality, and timeliness of each issue, directing the peer review process, ensuring that accepted manuscripts conform to defined standards, and meeting all publishing responsibilities assigned...



Submit Your Abstract for Congress

Fri, 3 May 2013 09:00:32 -0500

Abstract submission for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 43rd Critical Care Congress is now open. Contribute to the advancement of critical care by submitting your original investigative research and case reports for presentation at the 2014 Congress to be held in San Francisco, California, USA. If accepted, your work will be on display from January 10 to 12, 2014, and will be published in Critical Care Medicine, the #1 critical care subspecialty journal...



$50,000 in Funding Available for Research Projects

Fri, 3 May 2013 09:00:11 -0500

Through generous funding from the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), a Vision Grant of $50,000 is offered to support member researchers. Submit your application by August 31, 2013, to be considered for grant support in 2014...



Family Presence During CPR

Fri, 19 Apr 2013 10:42:20 -0500

Observational and qualitative studies have suggested positive benefits associated with family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Family presence may help alleviate the emotional burden and improve the bereavement process. Concerns about interference with resuscitative efforts and medicolegal ramifications have yet to be answered in rigorously designed studies. Patricia Jabre and colleagues in France conducted a multicenter, randomized controlled trial to determine if family presence during CPR was associated with a reduction in the likelihood of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related symptoms. Results were published in the March 14 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine...



New Bird Flu Virus Hits China

Fri, 19 Apr 2013 10:42:02 -0500

A new bird flu virus, influenza A (H7N9), has killed or critically stricken patients in China. Genetic evaluation of the virus shows it has the ability to mutate readily. The World Health Organization notes, “analysis of the genes of these viruses suggests that although they have evolved from avian (bird) viruses, they show signs of adaptation to growth in mammalian species." So far, H7N9 has not been found to be transmissible from human to human; those who’ve contracted it have had contact with poultry...



Join the Creative Community

Fri, 19 Apr 2013 10:41:46 -0500

There is still time to join the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Creative Community. Participation is one of the most important contributions a member can make in helping the Society achieve its mission and vision. Applications to join are due May 1, 2013. Please note that reappointment to a committee is not automatic. If you are already a committee or task force member and your term is about to expire, you will need to reapply...



Call for 2014 Council Nominations

Fri, 19 Apr 2013 10:41:28 -0500

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Nominating Committee is seeking candidates for the 2014 election. Council terms are for three years, and both at-large and designated seats are open. Elections for designated seats are staggered to allow for a sustained experience and memory of Council deliberations, as well as to promote fresh perspectives in the governance of the Society...



Start Preparing for Critical Care Awareness Month

Fri, 19 Apr 2013 10:41:09 -0500

As May approaches, it is time for intensive care unit (ICU) teams to consider how they will celebrate National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month (NCCARM). ICUs mark this special month in various ways, from sharing blue treats with staff or providing educational symposia, staff recognition ceremonies, or ICU tours. Other units invite former patients and their families to meet staff and share their progress...



Apply New SSC Bundles in Triage

Fri, 19 Apr 2013 10:40:50 -0500

The recently revised Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines identify triage in the emergency room as “time zero,” starting the clock on measuring compliance with the bundle elements. This measurement is central to the Campaign’s goals of performance improvement and mortality reduction. When determining patient eligibility for the three- and six-hour bundles, clinicians must understand the rationale for establishing triage as time zero and recognize how to implement the bundles in various scenarios...



What Are the Risks in Pediatric RBC Transfusion?

Mon, 8 Apr 2013 16:17:30 -0500

Although anemia may cause an increase in morbidity and mortality rates in critically ill pediatric patients, transfusion of packed red blood cells (pRBCs) carries significant risks, which have also been demonstrated in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. However, studies related to these risks have had problems with confounding and the use of pRBCs that were not leukoreduced. Kneyber et al address these concerns in their study testing whether transfusion of leukocyte-depleted pRBCs within the first 48 hours after cardiac surgery would be independently associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation. Results were published in the March 2013 issue of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine...



Hong Kong Warns of New Coronavirus

Mon, 8 Apr 2013 16:17:10 -0500

A new coronavirus is on the loose, and Hong Kong and world health authorities are taking notice. The virus has killed 11 of the 17 people known to have contracted it, a death rate much higher than that of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Unlike SARS, which affected the respiratory system, this new virus, dubbed “novel coronavirus,” attacks multiple organs. The most likely source of this new disease is bats, though monkeys, pigs, civet cats and even rabbits can also harbor it. To be prepared, Hong Kong officials have started conducting simulations in the event of an outbreak, including quarantines and treatment protocols. The new potential outbreak seems to be centered in the Middle East, with several cases linked to travelers who visited Qatar, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. The Society will continue to monitor this situation and will keep members abreast of any new information...



SCCM Highlights 2013 Vision Grant Winner

Mon, 8 Apr 2013 16:16:44 -0500

Interested in applying for the 2013 Vision Grant? The 2013 recipient, Azra Bihorac, MD, MS, FCCM, FASN, summarizes her research project and offers insight into the grant application process. Her work also is featured in the February/March issue of Critical Connections. The Vision Grant offers up to $50,000 in funding to an SCCM member whose work supports education, teamwork, outcomes measures, and reporting and continuous improvement. The deadline to submit an application is August 31, 2013...



Nominate Prestigious Fellows for MCCM

Mon, 8 Apr 2013 16:16:25 -0500

The deadline to nominate colleagues for the American College of Critical Care Medicine’s (ACCM) Master of Critical Care Medicine (MCCM) designation is approaching. Those with the MCCM designation have distinguished themselves through outstanding contributions in research and education, as well as through service to the Society and the field. They have achieved national and international professional recognition due to personal character, leadership and eminence in clinical practice. To be eligible, candidates must have been Fellows of the ACCM for at least five years. Nominations for the MCCM designation are due April 15, 2013...



Access Webcasts from the 41st Critical Care Congress

Mon, 8 Apr 2013 16:16:04 -0500

Webcasts featuring the sponsored sessions from the Society’s Critical Care Congress in Houston, Texas, USA, still are available at LearnICU.org. Access these complimentary presentations before they expire and earn continuing education credits..



New Pediatric Board Prep and Review Tool Available

Mon, 8 Apr 2013 16:15:46 -0500

Assess your critical care knowledge and prepare for the subspecialty board examination in critical care with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Advanced Knowledge Assessment in Pediatric Critical Care. This self-study tool is designed for physicians working on board preparation and maintenance of certification (MOC)...



Can Respiratory Tract Cultures Predict VAP?

Fri, 22 Mar 2013 16:01:49 -0500

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an important complication in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Current guidelines in the United States strongly recommend that surveillance be conducted for bacterial pneumonia in ICU patients, but diagnostic criteria have been criticized for the lack of sensitivity and specificity, especially regarding multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. Brusselaers and investigators from Ghent University in Belgium performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the sensitivity and specificity of surveillance cultures in predicting pathogens in VAP. Their results were published in the March issue of Intensive Care Medicine...



NQF Endorses SSC Measures

Fri, 22 Mar 2013 16:01:31 -0500

The National Quality Forum (NQF) ratified the measures for the treatment and management of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock as submitted collaboratively by the Henry Ford Hospital, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Society of Critical Care Medicine. Measures ratified by NQF are considered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) for public reporting and payment programs. The measures are consistent with the updated Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) bundles. The SSC’s North American Steering Committee will conduct grand rounds with CMS on March 27 to outline the measures and data that informed them. Participating in the grand rounds will be SSC members Sean R. Townsend, MD, Emanuel P. Rivers, MD, MPH, Mitchell M. Levy, MD, FCCM, and R. Phillip Dellinger, MD, MCCM. The Society thanks Townsend and Rivers who were instrumental in developing the application to NQF and in providing testimony to support the approval of the measures...



What's New in the Latest Glycemic Control Guidelines?

Fri, 22 Mar 2013 16:00:54 -0500

Judith Jacobi, PharmD, BCPS, FCCM, lead author on the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) new glycemic control guidelines, summarizes key points and implementation strategies. Guidelines for the Use of an Insulin Infusion for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Critically Ill Patients, was published in the December issue of Critical Care Medicine. The guideline release was accompanied by a podcast interview with Jacobi, as well as an issue of Critical Connections dedicated to the topic...



SSC Implementation Benefits Individual Team Members

Fri, 22 Mar 2013 16:00:35 -0500

Customizing protocols and testing changes are key elements to improving care using the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s (SSC) quality improvement model. These elements allow teams to focus on changes that will create a reliable system. During the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) April 4 webcast, Participating in the SSC Campaign: How It Can Help You, Laura Evans, MD, MSc, will demonstrate the value of participating in a team-based research project, explain how implementing quality improvement initiatives can benefit the workforce, and provide information on how to improve sepsis care...



Put Your ICU to the Test

Fri, 22 Mar 2013 16:00:18 -0500

Improving quality and safety in the intensive care unit (ICU) often involves the coordinated efforts of multiple critical care team members. The Intensive Care Unit Resource, Evaluation, and Patient Outcomes Rating Tool (ICU REPORT) allows hospitals to thoroughly evaluate their critical care units in terms of personnel, organization and quality improvement processes. This easy-to-use online tool provides an opportunity for ICU directors and staff, as well as hospital administrators, to review the current state of their units, and subsequently implement plans for process and performance improvement...



CMS Finalizes Rule to Disclose Financial Relationships

Fri, 22 Mar 2013 15:59:56 -0500

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has launched the National Physician Payment Transparency Program, known as OPENPAYMENTS. CMS will post any transfer of value from applicable manufacturers to physicians and teaching hospitals on OPENPAYMENTS in an effort to create transparency and reduce the potential for conflicts of interest. Data will be collected starting August 1, 2013, and will be available on the website in September 2014...



Proton Pump Inhibitors Versus H2 Blockers

Fri, 8 Mar 2013 08:40:12 -0600

Up to 25% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients may have gastrointestinal bleeding when stress ulcer prophylaxis is not administered. In a systematic review and meta-analysis by Alhazzani et al, the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) versus histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) on the prevention of clinically important gastrointestinal bleeding was investigated. Their results were published in the February issue of Critical Care Medicine. After screening 1,215 titles and abstracts, fourteen randomized trials were found. PPIs were associated with a lower risk of clinically important bleeding compared to H2RAs (risk ratio [RR] 0.36;95% confidence interval [CI], 0.19-0.68, P=0.002;I2=0%). PPIs were also associated with a lower risk of overt bleeding compared to H2RAs, with a number needed for prophylaxis of 30 using a control event rate of 5%. The overall methodology employed for this study was outstanding, and this study should serve as a model of how to properly conduct and report a systematic review and meta-analysis. Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal...



Wish Dr. Shoemaker a Happy Birthday!

Fri, 8 Mar 2013 08:39:55 -0600

One of the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s founding fathers and third president (1973-1974), William C. Shoemaker, MD, MCCM, celebrated his 90th birthday on February 27, 2013. Please take a moment to wish him a happy birthday and share your favorite memories...



Nominate Prestigious Fellows for MCCM

Fri, 8 Mar 2013 08:39:38 -0600

The American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM), is accepting nominations for Master of Critical Care Medicine (MCCM). Those awarded the MCCM designation have distinguished themselves through outstanding contributions in research and education, as well as through service to the Society and the field. They have achieved national and international professional prominence through personal character, leadership and eminence in clinical practice. MCCMs must have been Fellows of the ACCM for at least five years. Nominations for the MCCM designation are due April 15, 2013. For additional information on eligibility criteria and the nomination process, visit www.sccm.org/accm...



Award Recognizes Excellence in Bedside Teaching

Fri, 8 Mar 2013 08:39:16 -0600

Robert N. Sladen, MBChB, FCCM, and Robert D. Truog, MD, FCCM, both received this year’s Shubin-Weil Master Clinician/Teacher: Excellence in Bedside Teaching Award in recognition of their excellence in both teaching and the ethical practice of critical care. As a professor of anesthesiology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Sladen sets himself apart from his peers through his commitment to excellence at the bedside. His teaching skills are facilitated by his ability to transform complex subjects and break them into their essential components. His critical care fellowship curriculum at Columbia enhances learning and understanding on the nature of the disease but also in the management of complications. He often brings in nationally recognized lecturers from other institutions to address his students...



New Acute Cardiac Care Products Available

Fri, 8 Mar 2013 08:38:53 -0600

Acute cardiac conditions are becoming increasingly prevalent in critical care units. The publication Acute Cardiac Care: Selected Proceedings from the 10th Summer Conference in Intensive Care Medicine focuses on the effective diagnosis, management and treatment of cardiac complications in critically ill and injured patients. Based on presentations by experts in the field, this monograph is a valuable resource for clinicians who must be ready to provide high-quality care to patients with life-threatening cardiac conditions. You can also experience the educational content from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 10th Summer Conference in Intensive Care Medicine: Acute Cardiac Care, via Acute Cardiac Care On Demand. Videos containing both slides and lectures from every session are available in a searchable format, making it the next best thing to attending the live event...



OSCILLATE Trial Finds Possible Problems for ARDS Patients

Fri, 22 Feb 2013 08:48:06 -0600

High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) has been shown to improve oxygenation and survival in several small trials. Niall Ferguson and the OSCILLATE Trial Investigators, as well as researchers from the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group, performed a study to compare HFOV with a conventional ventilation strategy for patients with new-onset, moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Their results were published online January 22, 2013, in The New England Journal of Medicine...



Guidelines for Pain, Agitation & Delirium

Fri, 22 Feb 2013 08:47:47 -0600

The Society of Critical Care Medicine's American College of Critical Care Medicine published updated sedation guidelines in the January issue of Critical Care Medicine. “Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Pain, Agitation and Delirium in Adult Patients in the Intensive Care Unit” provides a road map for developing integrated, evidence-based, and patient-centered protocols for these conditions. Additionally, the February/March issue of Critical Connections focuses on the importance of pain management in patients in the intensive care unit, highlighting a variety of common issues associated with pain, agitation and delirium: managing patients with neurological injuries, optimizing short- and long-term outcomes, and a historical perspective on modernized sedation management. Guideline lead author Juliana Barr, MD, FCCM, contributed to this issue and participated in an accompanying iCritical Care podcast, SCCM Pod-205...



Celebrate Critical Care Awareness This May

Fri, 22 Feb 2013 08:47:28 -0600

It is not too early to make plans for celebrating National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month (NCCARM) this May. Clinical professionals mark this month in various ways, from sharing blue treats with staff and wearing blue on Friday, May 17, 2013, to more formal events, such as educational symposia, staff recognition ceremonies, or intensive care unit tours. Others invite former patients and their families to meet staff and share their progress. Regardless of how you celebrate NCCARM this year, be sure to share your stories and photos with the Society of Critical Care Medicine. Post to our Facebook page or email info@sccm.org...



Awards Recognize Excellence in Critical Care

Fri, 22 Feb 2013 08:47:10 -0600

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) offers numerous awards that recognize dedication and contributions to the field in a variety of areas. Nominate yourself or a colleague, or recognize your entire intensive care unit (ICU) team. Most award recipients receive a complimentary registration to the Critical Care Congress. The Shubin-Weil Master Clinician/Teacher: Excellence in Bedside Teaching Award honors a Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) member who is a role model of excellence in both the teaching and ethical practice of critical care. The nominee should be someone with direct patient responsibilities who is not well known nationally or internationally or whose name is not recognized from research efforts. The primary criteria for selection is excellence in teaching as evidenced by the accomplishments of the recipient’s trainees and ability to inspire the next generation of clinician-teachers. Applications and nominations are due April 1, 2013...



FCCM and MCCM Application Deadlines Approaching

Fri, 22 Feb 2013 08:46:53 -0600

The deadline to submit the completed application for the American College of Critical Care Medicine’s (ACCM) prestigious designation of Fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine (FCCM) or Master of Critical Care Medicine (MCCM) is April 15, 2013. The FCCM designation honors practitioners, researchers, administrators and educators who have made outstanding contributions to the collaborative field of critical care...



Gain Advanced or Fundamental Ultrasound Skills

Fri, 22 Feb 2013 08:46:31 -0600

Ultrasonography has become an invaluable tool in the management of critically ill and injured patients due to its portability, ease of use and accurate evaluation. With demand for ultrasound on the rise and new developments in technology, it is imperative that critical care practitioners stay up to date in this advanced modality. Obtain the latest ultrasound information available at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) popular course, Fundamentals of Critical Care Ultrasound, to be held August 7 and 8, 2013, at the JW Marriott in Washington, DC, USA. Participants will benefit from guided, focused skill stations, featuring live models and interactive presentations to reinforce key learning points...



Registration Open for 2013 Board Review Course

Fri, 22 Feb 2013 08:46:05 -0600

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s 2013 Adult Multiprofessional Critical Care Board Review Course (MCCBRC) sets the standard in board preparation with a comprehensive review that prepares fellows and attending physicians for the certification and recertification examinations in critical care. Led by an internationally recognized faculty, this four-and-a-half-day course offers expert guidance on the core areas of critical care medicine. Whether you need to certify, recertify or simply review, MCCBRC provides an excellent update and thorough overview of the field...



Is Measuring Gastric Residual Volume Necessary?

Fri, 8 Feb 2013 09:02:11 -0600

Monitoring gastric residual volume (GRV), a common practice in intensive care units (ICUs), is believed to decrease the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Jean Reignier and members of the Clinical Research in Intensive Care and Sepsis (CRICS) Group sought to test this belief and published their results in the January 16, 2013, issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association. The results of this study challenge the practice of routinely checking GRVs in all mechanically ventilated patients receiving gastric feeds. A GRV cutoff of 250 mL was used; several other studies have evaluated higher GRVs (up to 500 mL). It is possible that more complications might occur at higher GRVs, but previous work has not shown VAP rates to be greater. Hence, the results are not necessarily externally generalizable to all ICU populations, including surgical and trauma populations. Based on the results of this study, the routine stopping of enteral nutrition for GRVs < 250 mL should be reconsidered in medical ICU patients receiving gastric feeds. Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal...



Surviving Sepsis: Renewed Commitment

Fri, 8 Feb 2013 09:01:46 -0600

The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines were published jointly in the February issues of Critical Care Medicine and Intensive Care Medicine, providing an update on best clinical practices for patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guidelines were unveiled at a session during the 42nd Critical Care Congress, where leaders of the Campaign championed for a renewed commitment, seeking to increase the number of hospitals contributing data to the Campaign to 10,000 worldwide, to apply the guidelines to 100% of patients in whom the diagnosis is suspected, and to develop a strategy to improve the care of septic patients where healthcare resources are limited...



New USP Label Standard for Heparin Products

Fri, 8 Feb 2013 09:01:23 -0600

The U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) has changed the labeling standard for heparin sodium injection and heparin lock flush solution. The new standard requires manufacturers to clearly state on the label the strength of the entire container of the medication, followed closely by how much of the medication is in each milliliter. The standard will become official in May 2013.To assist physicians in transitioning through this change, USP has updated the resources page of their website with additional information on the new standard...



Embark on a Study Mission to South Africa

Fri, 8 Feb 2013 09:01:00 -0600

Visit critical care units in South Africa for an amazing opportunity to expand your knowledge of the scope and practice of care during the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Study Mission to South Africa, August 25 to September 2, 2013. South Africa is one of the most diverse and enchanting countries in the world. Participants will enjoy great amenities, outstanding sightseeing and exotic adventures throughout the trip...



Restrictive vs. Liberal Transfusion

Fri, 25 Jan 2013 09:06:07 -0600

Current guidelines for the management of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding recommend a transfusion threshold hemoglobin (hgb) level of 7 g/dL. However, evidence for a restrictive transfusion strategy in acute GI bleeding is lacking. Càndid Villanueva and investigators performed a randomized clinical trial to assess whether a restrictive versus liberal blood transfusion strategy was safer for patients with acute GI hemorrhage. Their results were published in the January 3, 2013, issue of The New England Journal of Medicine...



CCM and PCCM Debut New Look

Fri, 25 Jan 2013 09:05:49 -0600

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s journals, Critical Care Medicine and Pediatric Critical Care Medicine have a fresh new look. The redesign offers an easy to read two-column page layout with more enhanced tables and figures...



Registration Deadline Approaching for MCCKAP

Fri, 25 Jan 2013 09:05:23 -0600

Friday, February 1, 2013, is the deadline to take advantage of reduced rates for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 2013 Multidisciplinary Critical Care Knowledge Assessment Program (MCCKAP). Administered online February 28 to March 8, 2013, the MCCKAP exam is used by critical care program directors to assess the strengths and weaknesses of their fellowship program participants. Available in both adult and pediatric formats, the exam allows program directors...



Are More Patients Surviving In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests?

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 13:42:37 -0600

Despite the increase in evidence-based guidelines for advanced cardiac life support and resuscitation care during the past decade, it is not clear whether survival and neurologic function after in-hospital cardiac arrest have improved. In the November issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, investigators with the American Heart Association’s Get with the Guidelines® (GWTG)-Resuscitation used clinical registry data to examine trends in rates of survival to hospital discharge. The authors concluded that both survival and neurological outcomes improved substantially from 2000 to 2009. While improved survival for in-hospital cardiac arrest is encouraging, future confirmatory studies are indicated to identify the specific aspects responsible for this positive trend. Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal. Additional resources related to critical care cardiac issues are available in the Cardiovascular Knowledge Line of LearnICU.org.



Access Free Webcasts from the 41st Critical Care Congress

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 13:42:20 -0600

Webcasts featuring the sponsored sessions from the Society’s Critical Care Congress in Houston, Texas, USA, still are available for free at LearnICU.org. Access these presentations and earn continuing education credit before they expire: Sedation and Delirium in the ICU - Supported by Hospira, Inc. Sodium Challenges in the Critical Care Patient - Supported by Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. Hypercoagulopathy and Hypocoagulopathy - Supported by The Medicines Company Who Needs Renal Support? - Supported by Gambro



PDR Drug Alert Issued on Rheumatoid Arthritis Agent

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 13:42:02 -0600

PDR Drug Alerts sent an alert to the critical care community regarding the drug Xeljanz (tofacitinlib), which is used to treat adults with moderate to severe active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have had an inadequate response or intolerance to methotrexate. Xeljanz, which is marketed by Pfizer Inc., was associated with an increased risk of serious infections, including opportunistic infections (which occur primarily when the immune system is suppressed), tuberculosis, cancers and lymphoma. Xeljanz treatment is also associated with increases in cholesterol and liver enzyme tests and decreases in blood counts. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy is necessary for Xeljanz to ensure that the benefits of the drug outweigh the potential risks...



NQF Endorses Stroke Rehabilitation Measures

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 13:41:45 -0600

The National Quality Forum (NQF) has endorsed 14 stroke and stroke rehabilitation measures developed by the American Medical Association (AMA)-convened Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement (PCPI) in collaboration with the American Academy of Neurology, American College of Radiology and the National Committee for Quality Assurance. The Society of Critical Care Medicine contributed to the development and revision of these measures through liaison Thomas Bleck, MD, FCCM. The revised measures are focused on issues related to ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage and transient ischemic attack and are designed to evaluate processes that have been demonstrated to improve outcomes. The revised measures can be downloaded from the AMA website.



Assess Your Fellowship Program with the MCCKAP Exam

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 13:41:24 -0600

Administered online February 28 to March 8, 2013, the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 2013 Multidisciplinary Critical Care Knowledge Assessment Program (MCCKAP) exam is used by critical care program directors to assess the strengths and weaknesses of their fellowship program participants. Available in both adult and pediatric formats, MCCKAP consists of approximately 200 multiple-choice questions pertaining to critical care knowledge and patient management based on national standards. The MCCKAP exam allows program directors to: Prepare fellows for the subspecialty board examinations in critical care Identify specific knowledge areas of strength and weakness with a list of key terms and references provided for missed questions Receive results for individual fellows and the overall program as well as the institution’s national ranking Assess preliminary scores and analysis immediately upon completion of the test Register before February 1, 2013, to take advantage of discounted rates.



Advance Registration for Congress Ends Next Week

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 13:41:00 -0600

December 12 is the last day to take advantage of advance registration discounts for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 42nd Critical Care Congress, to be held in sunny San Juan, Puerto Rico, January 19 to 23, 2013. Thereafter, registration will be accepted on site only. Additional hotels have just been added in Puerto Rico. Visit the Congress housing Web page and make your hotel reservation today! Register online using your Customer ID (INSERT_CUSTOM02) and password, or call SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888. Download the Congress App Prepare for the 42nd Critical Care Congress by downloading the Congress App to access the complete schedule of events, create your schedule, view the list of speakers and much more. Point your mobile web browser to www.sccm.org/ccc42app to access this handy tool. Apps designed specifically for the iPhone, iPad, Android are available now! Search "SCCM" in Google Play or the iTunes store. Blackberry is coming soon.



Get an Inside View of South Africa’s Healthcare System

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 13:40:41 -0600

Expand your knowledge of the scope and practice of critical care during the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 2013 Study Mission to South Africa, August 25 to September 2, 2013. Participants of SCCM’s 2013 Study Mission will experience: Daily visits to local private and public hospitals in Johannesburg and Durban, as well as a community clinic in Zululand Sunrise and afternoon safaris through a 55,000 acre wildlife reserve, populated with buffalos, elephants, leopards, rhinos, lions, cheetahs, and more An afternoon of attendance at the 2013 World Congress Meeting in Durban Breathtaking tours to such famous sites as the Apartheid Museum, Nelson Mandela’s house in Soweto, the Voortrekker Monument and Paul Kruger House Museum in Pretoria, Lesedi Cultural Village, and the Zamapilo Craft Market Following the Study Mission is an optional excursion to Cape Town, from September 2 to 6, 2013. During this trip, participants will retreat to a luxury waterfront resort and enjoy tours to Table Mountain, the Groote Schuur Heart Transplant Museum, Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, and more.



Intra-Aortic Balloon Support for Cardiogenic Shock, AMI

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:12:18 -0500

Despite relative scarce evidence to support their use, intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs) have received high-grade recommendations in both U.S. and European guidelines for use in the management of cardiogenic shock. In the October issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, Holger Thiele, MD, and the IABP-SHOCK II trial investigators conducted a controlled study to see whether IABP counterpulsation is associated with improved survival for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and cardiogenic shock...



NQF Seeks Comment on Infectious Disease Standards

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:12:01 -0500

The National Quality Forum (NQF) reviews, endorses and recommends healthcare performance measures in an effort to improve care. Two importance measures related to infectious disease should garner special attention from the critical care community. The NQF is seeking public comment on its consensus standards for central line bundle compliance by November 9, 2012. The NQF has voted not to recommend this compliance measure, as it did not pass importance criteria to measure and report. This is related to the drastic improvement in central line infections that have been noted over time and the robust reporting structure currently in place. Measures can be retired when they have met their intended purpose...



SCCM Member Appointed Liaison of NQF

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:11:43 -0500

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) congratulates member Jason M. Kane, MD, MS, for his recent appointment as liaison to the National Quality Forum (NQF). Kane, who serves as assistant professor of pediatrics and as a pediatric intensivist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois, brings important expertise in patient safety having completed a master’s of science degree in patient safety and healthcare quality at Northwestern University. In his new role, Kane will serve on the Health Professionals Council, providing information on performance measurement and public reporting to SCCM’s leadership and membership...



New Drugs Tied to Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:11:27 -0500

The Society of Critical Care Medicine is staying apprised of the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak stemming from steroid injections. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has noted two additional tainted drugs. A cooling cardioplegia solution made by New England Compounding Center (NECC), used in heart surgery; and triamcinolone acetonide, utilized for skin conditions, have been implicated. While the FDA hasn’t confirmed that the two products are to blame, it has issued a warning...



New Webcast Series Offers Sepsis Care Strategies

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:11:07 -0500

Please join us on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, for the first event in a newly developed free webcast series that provides strategies for successful implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). The SSC, an initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), aims to improve the management, diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in order to reduce the high mortality rate associated with the condition. The SSC’s guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock involve the implementation of process improvement initiatives via care bundles...



Pro/Con: Deactivating Durable Mechanical Support Devices

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:10:48 -0500

Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) and total artificial hearts (TAH) are surgically implanted as a permanent treatment of unrecoverable heart failure. Both are durable mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices that can prolong patient survival but can also influence the end-of-life trajectory. Discontinuing assisted circulation is a prevalent ethical challenge because device deactivation is a life-ending intervention. The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) November 15 webcast, When Is Deactivating Durable MCS Devices Physician-Assisted Death?, will present a pro/con debate on the permissibility of end-of-life deactivation of durable MCS devices...



Cue the Calypso Music and Register for Congress Today

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:10:31 -0500

Surrender to the charm of island life, and experience the true beauty of the Caribbean at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 42nd Critical Care Congress, to be held January 19 to 23, 2013, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where attendees will encounter new health principles that can be integrated into patient care and utilized to create healthier, safer work environments...



Embark on a Unique Critical Care Study Mission to South Africa

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:10:14 -0500

Expand your knowledge of the scope and practice of critical care during the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Study Mission to South Africa, to be held August 25 to September 2, 2013. South Africa is one of the most diverse and enchanting countries in the world. Exotic combinations of landscapes, people, history and culture offer a unique and inspiring setting...



Increased Risk of Death with Insulin Control and Hypoglycemia

Thu, 4 Oct 2012 14:44:02 -0500

The Normoglycemia in Intensive Care Evaluation-Survival Using Glucose Algorithm Regulation (NICE-SUGAR) trial recruited 6,104 intensive care unit (ICU) patients in 24 hospitals. In this post hoc analysis of the trial’s database, the NICE-SUGAR investigators explored the association between different levels of hypoglycemia and death. Findings were published in the September 20 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. Forty-five percent of patients had moderate hypoglycemia, including 74.2% of patients in the intensive glucose control group. In the intensive glucose control group, 6.9% of patients had severe hypoglycemia (n=208/3013). Patients with moderate hypoglycemia were more likely to have severe sepsis, trauma, diabetes, and cardiovascular failure...



10 Ethical Rules for Hospitals During a Drug Shortage

Thu, 4 Oct 2012 14:43:45 -0500

A group of clinicians at Duke University Medical Center have published a drug rationing plan to help healthcare providers make fair and equitable choices when medications run low. “Coping with Critical Drug Shortages: An Ethical Approach for Allocating Scarce Resources in Hospitals,” published in the Archives of Internal Medicine outlines 10 ethical rules for hospitals. In an accompanying editorial, Paula Rochon, MD, MPH, FRCPC, and Jerry Gurwitz, MD, called the article a wake-up call to clinicians to become better educated about and more engaged in the issue of drug shortages. "Clinicians need to be vigilant about reviewing the drug shortage alert they receive because these alerts may directly affect their patients and their plans for patient care," they wrote...



SCCM Member Receives National Pharmacy Research Grant

Thu, 4 Oct 2012 14:43:24 -0500

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) congratulates Pamela L. Smithburger, PharmD, BCPS, one of only two pharmacist investigators to receive the New Investigator Research Grant from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation. The grant helps ensure that pharmacists participate on interdisciplinary patient care teams by accounting for patients’ medication outcomes. The $20,000 grant will be used to conduct Smithburger’s research related to off-label medication use and adverse drug events in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients, with guidance from senior investigator and fellow SCCM member Sandra Kane-Gill, PharmD, MS, FCCM...



Optimize Airway Functions in Critically Ill Patients

Thu, 4 Oct 2012 14:43:06 -0500

Reducing potential complications associated with airway devices in critically ill patients requires a thorough understanding of current airway management practices and trends. Utilizing research-based protocols is an important way in which critical care practitioners may contribute to improving patient care and outcomes. The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) October 18 webcast, Airway Complications and Management, will provide strategies on how to assess for airway problems before intubation and how to manage an intubated patient.



On-Site Registration Available for Pharmacotherapy Course

Thu, 4 Oct 2012 14:42:49 -0500

Registration will be available on site for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Pharmacotherapy in Critical Illness conference, to be held October 19 and 20, 2012, at the Loews New Orleans Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. An SCCM member will be available to assist you starting Friday, October 19, from 7:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the SCCM registration desk in Parish Hall. Participate in thought-provoking discussions on effective drug therapies for challenges that arise in the pharmacological treatment of critically ill patients. This conference will feature didactic sessions, case presentations, pro/con debates, audience participation, and question-and-answer sessions...



Get in the Spirit of Puerto Rico

Thu, 4 Oct 2012 14:42:31 -0500

The production of "Ron" (Spanish for Rum) has been a stalwart of the Puerto Rican economy since the 16th century. Rum production began in the 1650s, a byproduct of the sugar cane industry on which Puerto Rico made its early living. Today, Puerto Rico produces approximately 70% of the rum consumed in the United States and boasts internationally recognized and celebrated brands that have garnered countless awards. Here’s an introductory “rumdown” on which rum to use for a particular occasion: Light or Silver Rum Subtle flavor and delicate aroma. Ideal to mix with fruit juices. Gold or Amber Rum Full-bodied with a deep, mellow flavor. Perfect with seafood dishes. Dark or Black Rum Full-bodied with a deep taste and a complex flavor. Pairs well with steak. Premium Aged Rums Specially aged to provide a slight twist in flavor. The perfect after-dinner sip.



Is Too Much Fluid Bad for Patients With SAH?

Fri, 28 Sep 2012 09:07:43 -0500

Induced hypertension, hypervolemia and hemodilution (triple-H) therapy has historically been considered to be beneficial for the treatment of vasospasm in patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In the October issue of Neurocritical Care, Martini and colleagues from the Oregon Health and Science University and University of Washington sought to determine the association between early fluid balance and outcomes for patients with SAH. They reviewed 356 patients with SAH in a retrospective trial at a level I trauma and stroke referral center in Seattle, Washington...



Read Pediatric Critical Care Medicine on Your iPad

Fri, 28 Sep 2012 09:07:27 -0500

The September issue of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (PCCM) is now available online. The issue includes an article by Katri Typpo, MD, MPH, titled “Impact of Resident Duty Hour Limits on Safety in the ICU: A National Survey of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensivists.” Read the article and then listen to an in-depth interview with the author in SCCM Pod-192 PCCM: Residents Reveal Patient Safety Perceptions. Subscribe to the iCritical Care podcasts at iTunes or download episodes at www.sccm.org/iCriticalCare...



Critical Connections Highlights Palliative Care, ACCM Guidelines

Fri, 28 Sep 2012 09:07:11 -0500

The August/September issue of Critical Connections focuses on the importance of providing quality palliative care in the intensive care unit. Find practical tools for integrating palliative care professionals into the emergency department, learn more about palliative care in the pediatric intensive care unit, and gain insight into the chaplain’s perspective...



New Webcast Provides Strategies to Prevent Airway Issues

Fri, 28 Sep 2012 09:06:52 -0500

Airway complications are among the most common issues reported in the intensive care unit, with human error playing the most important role. Although airway control is often a challenging task, research indicates the following strategies can help minimize the risks associated with intubation: a thorough airway assessment, use of continuous capnography and suitably trained operators and assistants...



Pharmacotherapy On-Site Registration Available

Fri, 28 Sep 2012 09:06:35 -0500

Join your colleagues October 19 and 20, 2012, in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) conference, Pharmacotherapy in Critical Illness. Registration will be available on site at Loews New Orleans Hotel. An SCCM member will be available to assist you starting Friday, October 19, from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the SCCM registration desk in Parish Hall. To take advantage of the exclusive discounted hotel rate for attendees, make your hotel reservation by Wednesday, September 26, 2012...



Explore the Latest Developments in Critical Care at Congress

Fri, 28 Sep 2012 09:06:13 -0500

From the breathtaking sunsets and shimmering beaches, to the ancient caves and cool, mountainous, subtropical rainforests, Puerto Rico provides a canvas of diverse environments and unrivaled natural wonders. Experience paradise perfected at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 42nd Critical Care Congress, to be held January 19 to 23, 2013, at the Puerto Rico Convention Center in San Juan, Puerto Rico. This five-day event will offer opportunities to make valuable connections and draw diverse perspectives from all members of the multiprofessional critical care team. Learn about the latest developments in critical care by attending the always-popular abstract presentations and Poster Hall events offered at Congress...



Corticosteroids and Outcomes for Patients with Pneumonia

Wed, 12 Sep 2012 10:43:26 -0500

Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are often prescribed systemic corticosteroids for a wide variety of indications, including chronic obstructive lung disease and multiple trauma injuries. To assess the characteristics and outcomes of patients with ICU-acquired pneumonia that received steroids, Ranzani and colleagues performed a prospective observational study at a major university teaching hospital in Barcelona, Spain. Their findings were published in the September issue of Critical Care Medicine. Of the 316 consecutive patients included, 125 (40%) received steroids at the time ICU-acquired pneumonia was diagnosed. In the steroid group, unadjusted mortality was 39% (n=49) compared to 28% in the group that did not receive steroids. After adjustment for multiple independent variables, steroid treatment was statistically significantly associated with decreased 28-day survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.503; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-5.33; p=0.017).



FDA Hold Workshops on Safety of Starch IV Drips

Wed, 12 Sep 2012 10:43:11 -0500

Clinicians have debated the safety and efficacy of hydroxyethyl starch, widely used for fluid resuscitation in intensive care units, especially in patients with severe sepsis. A study published in the July New England Journal of Medicine found that after 90 days, 201 patients of 398 given starch had died, compared with 172 of 400 given the fluid Ringer's acetate. Starches have been used in the belief that they are less likely to leach out of the circulatory system than saline. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has convened public workshops this week to discuss whether the use of starches should be discontinued. "The Society is following these developments closely and will keep our members informed as more information becomes available," said SCCM president-elect Carol Thompson, PhD, ACNP, CCRN.



Section and Chapter Grants Support Educational Opportunities

Wed, 12 Sep 2012 10:42:54 -0500

The deadline to apply for travel grants has been extended through Friday, September 14, 2012. Select Society of Critical Care Medicine Specialty Sections are offering $500 to first and presenting authors of accepted abstracts to help offset travel expenses to Congress. For additional information on the grant, please contact Colette Punda at cpunda@sccm.org. In addition, the Northeast Chapter provides grant opportunities to support grand rounds, visiting lecturers and more. Applicants must be members of the Northeast Chapter, allow attendance of fellow chapter members, and advertise events in the chapter’s iRoom. Applications should include a brief statement about an event’s relation to patient care, staff/faculty development, quality and patient safety, or focused critical care populations. For additional information, contact the chapter. The Northeast Chapter serves Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont. Follow the chapter on Twitter.



Upcoming Webcast Will Address Management of IAH and ACS

Wed, 12 Sep 2012 10:42:35 -0500

Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is recognized as the cause and consequence of many adverse events in critically ill patients. While generally occurring in surgical patients, IAH may also occur in medical patients without abdominal conditions and is a potential cause of kidney failure in critically ill patients. The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) September 20 webcast, Managing Intra-abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS), will discuss the current understanding of these conditions, early recognition and assessment, and treatment and preventative measures using the collaborative practices of the intensive care unit clinical staff.



New Orleans is Jazzed Up for the Pharmacotherapy Conference

Wed, 12 Sep 2012 10:42:17 -0500

Hurricane Isaac had no lasting impact on New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, and the city is ready to host the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Pharmacotherapy in Critical Illness conference October 19 and 20, 2012, with its world-class music, piping hot gumbo and sweet beignets. Recent news reports regarding flooding are for regions outside of the metropolitan area and New Orleans remains unaffected. Join your colleagues for a trip to the Big Easy to obtain the latest evidence-based information on how to optimize drug therapy outcomes. Register by Wednesday, September 19, 2012, to take advantage of reduced registration rates.