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Preview: Journal of Refugee Studies - current issue

Journal of Refugee Studies Current Issue





Published: Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Thu, 14 Dec 2017 05:45:54 GMT

 



Refugees, Regionalism and Responsibility. By Penelope Mathew & Tristan Harley

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Refugees, Regionalism and Responsibility. By MathewPenelope & HarleyTristan, Northampton: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016. 320 pp. £85. ISBN 9781782547280



The Concept of Climate Migration. By Benoît Mayer

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

The Concept of Climate Migration. By MayerBenoît. Cheltenham and Northampton: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016. 374 pp. £95.00. ISBN 978 1 78643 172 1



Fleeing Homophobia: Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Asylum. By Thomas Spijkerboer (ed)

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Fleeing Homophobia: Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Asylum. By SpijkerboerThomas (ed), Abingdon: Routledge (hb 2013, pb 2015). XVIII + 239 pp. £76.00 ISBN 978-0-415-62817-4 (hbk); £32.99 ISBN 9781138930131 (pb)



Troubled Transit: Asylum Seekers Stuck in Indonesia. By Antje Missbach

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Troubled Transit: Asylum Seekers Stuck in Indonesia. By MissbachAntje. Singapore: ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute, 2015. 289 pp. $29.90. ISBN: 978-981-4620-56-7



The New Humanitarians in International Practice: emerging actors and contested principles. By Zeynep Sezgin & Dennis Dijkzeul (eds)

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

The New Humanitarians in International Practice: emerging actors and contested principles. By SezginZeynep & DijkzeulDennis (eds), Oxford: Routledge, 2015. 384 pp. £110. ISBN 9781138829718 (hbk); £35.99. ISBN 9781315737621 (Ebook)



Refugees in Extended Exile: Living on the Edge. By Jennifer Hyndman and Winona Giles

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Refugees in Extended Exile: Living on the Edge. By HyndmanJennifer and GilesWinona, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016. 164 pp. £110. ISBN 9781138669734 (hbk); £35.99. ISBN 9781315618029 (Ebook)



Refugee Resettlement in the United States: Language, Policy, Pedagogy. By Emily Feuerherm & Vaidehi Ramanathan (eds)

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Refugee Resettlement in the United States: Language, Policy, Pedagogy. By FeuerhermEmily & RamanathanVaidehi (eds), Towanda, NY: Multilingual Matters, 2015. 205 pp. £29.95. ISBN 978178309456 (hbk)



South-South Education Migration, Humanitarianism and Development: Views from the Caribbean, North Africa and the Middle East. By Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

South-South Education Migration, Humanitarianism and Development: Views from the Caribbean, North Africa and the Middle East. By Fiddian-QasmiyehElena. Oxford: Routledge, 2015. ix + 157 pp, £65.00 ISBN 978-0-415-81478-2 (hbk), ISBN 978-0-203-06685-0 (Ebook)



The Law of Refugee Status, second edition. By James C. Hathaway and Michelle Foster

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 GMT

The Law of Refugee Status, second edition. By HathawayJames C. and FosterMichelle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014 (4th printing 2015). lxxxi + 693 pp. $180.00 (hbk); $65.00 (pb); $52.00 (Ebook)



Urban Resettlement in Colombo from a Wellbeing Perspective: Does Development-Forced Resettlement Lead to Improved Wellbeing?

Wed, 10 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
For almost a decade, Colombo has been the site of a massive urban regeneration programme driven by the public and the private sectors. One of the main components of this regeneration programme has been the involuntary acquisition of land from slum communities and subsequent resettlement of slum dwellers in multi-storied housing complexes. How does such rapid resettlement in high-rise apartments impact the slum dwellers who are subjected to such treatment. This article tries to determine how resettlement and associated social, cultural and economic transformations impact on beneficiaries’ sense of wellbeing in the medium term. While the concept of wellbeing is broad and has been applied by scholars in various fields of scholarship, this article utilizes the concept in the specific context of development-forced displacement and resettlement (DFDR). We examine how displacement and resettlement determine material, relational and subjective dimensions of wellbeing among the affected communities.



Refugee Youth in Sweden Who Arrived as Unaccompanied Minors and Separated Children

Tue, 09 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
The number of children fleeing and/or seeking asylum alone without parents or guardians has been increasing during the last decade worldwide, where Sweden has been receiving the largest number of asylum claims by unaccompanied minors in Europe. Despite the growing interest in the situation of this group in destination countries, there is a lack of research articles that address this group with nationwide comprehensive data. This study examines the labour-market situation of the whole population of the refugee youth who entered Sweden as unaccompanied minors or separated children and were registered during the years 2003–12. We investigate whether this group is in a disadvantageous situation regarding labour-market incorporation compared to their counterparts who arrived with their families due to their specific marginalized and vulnerable position within society. The results show that this group exhibits capacity and resilience in terms of finding employment and willingness to work. The results are discussed with a structural incorporation framework from a reception and integration policy perspective as well as from an immigrant wellbeing and a ‘whole-child’ approach.



The Politics of Food and Hospitality: How Syrian Refugees in Belgium Create a Home in Hostile Environments

Fri, 05 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
While eating practices fulfil a central role in expressing collective identities, they potentially turn into sites of contention when individuals are forced to migrate. By drawing upon semi-structured interviews and informal observations with Syrian refugees in Belgium, this article describes the politics of food and hospitality through which wider socio-political subjectivities are renegotiated. More precisely, I argue that three sets of meanings are crucial to understand the symbolic importance of food and hospitality, and the conditions under which it feeds into a series of micro-political struggles: (i) the power-infused relations between hosting and being hosted or between giving and receiving; (ii) a sense of individual autonomy and dignity; and (iii) the revitalization of collective selves. By putting these three sets of meanings into practice, Syrian refugees create intimate bubbles of homeliness that are often subversive to the hostile environment in which they find themselves.



Being a Refugee University Student: A Collaborative Auto-ethnography

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
In this article, we adopt a collaborative auto-ethnographic approach to explore the experiences of one refugee university student. Our method involved all three authors systematically analysing narratives written by one of us: R Student. These accounts provide deep descriptions of his life while studying at three different United Kingdom universities and our analysis of them demonstrates that higher education was a double-edged sword for R Student. Our research illuminates how R Student’s past as a survivor of genocide and forced migration, his corrosive and supportive relationships, and neo-liberal policies and practices all intersected in complex ways to circumscribe his agency and inform his experience as a refugee student. This understanding runs counter to neo-liberal policies and practices within higher education which often blame individuals for the problems they encounter and obscure social and relational forces. In describing the operable effects of abstract policies and concepts upon R Student, our study provides a counter-narrative to neo-liberal discourse and identifies systemic issues that may affect other students, too.



Refugees’ ‘Journeys of Trust’: Creating an Analytical Framework to Examine Refugees’ Exilic Journeys with a Focus on Trust

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
This article presents a novel analytical framework to examine refugees’ journeys to exile from the perspective of ‘trust‘. I define trust as a positive feeling about or evaluation of the intentions or behaviour of another, and conceptualize it as a discursively created emotion and practice which is based on the relations between the ‘trustor’ and the ‘trustee‘. I create a novel analytical framework for the study of refugees’ ‘journeys of trust’ that consists of the temporal characteristics, the drivers and contexts, and the contents and orientations of ‘journeys of trust’, and the characteristics of the voyagers and their intersectionality. This analytical framework is applied in this article regarding Congolese refugees’ journeys to Kampala, Uganda. Conceptually, I suggest that refugees’ exilic journeys in this context need to be investigated by linking the trust-based discourses of their reasons to flee, their travel from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to Uganda and, finally, their arrival to their city of exile, Kampala. The usefulness of this trust-focused analytical framework for the study of refugee journeys is reflected in the conclusion.



The Interconnection between Acculturation and Subjective and Social Wellbeing among Refugee Youth in Australia

Mon, 26 Dec 2016 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
In Australia, the number of refugee youth has increased significantly over the last five years. Australia presents a unique resettlement context for refugees due the country’s simultaneous adoption of positive multicultural policies yet hard-line immigration laws and negative popular opinion towards refugees. Little is known about the acculturation experiences and wellbeing of refugee youth in Australia. The present study investigated refugee youth’s acculturation preferences, measured through the vignettes and bilineal methods, and how these preferences comparatively relate to refugee youth’s subjective and social wellbeing. One hundred and six first-generation refugee youth participated in this study. Participants ranged in age from 13 years to 21 years (M = 16.82; SD = 1.91) and completed self-report questionnaires. Results revealed a strong endorsement of the integration acculturation preference among refugee youth, as measured by both the vignette and bilineal methods. Interestingly, results revealed a positive association between the two underlying acculturation dimensions (ethnic and Australian), which is in contrast to Berry’s (1997) original acculturation model which posits that the two dimensions should be independent. This suggests refugee youth may have two primary acculturation options: integration or marginalization. Moreover, results also suggested these acculturation preferences might be differentially related to wellbeing, with integration associated with better social wellbeing and marginalization associated with worse subjective wellbeing. Theoretical and methodological implications of the study are discussed.