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Hackaday



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Last Build Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2017 09:01:53 +0000

 



FatPiBoy: Respin Game Boy with a Pop-Out Controllerfatboy_feattomnardi

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 09:01:48 +0000

Have you ever found yourself wishing you had a clone of the Game Boy, except it was actually twice as wide, and instead of holding it in your hands you pop a tiny separate controller out of the middle and play it that way? No? Well, neither have we. But that didn’t stop [Christian Reinbacher] from designing and building exactly that, and by the looks of the finished product, we have to say he might be onto something.

To be fair, the charmingly-named FatPiBoy is not really meant to be played like the GameBoy of yesteryear. It’s more like a …read more

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Gorgeous Engineering Inside Wheels of a Robotic Trail BuddyRover Featureddp2cnk

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 06:01:39 +0000

Robots are great in general, and [taylor] is currently working on something a bit unusual: a 3D printed explorer robot to autonomously follow outdoor trails, named Rover. Rover is still under development, and [taylor] recently completed the drive system and body designs, all shared via OnShape.

Rover has 3D printed 4.3:1 reduction planetary gearboxes embedded into each wheel, with off the shelf bearings and brushless motors. A Raspberry Pi sits in the driver’s seat, and the goal is to use a version of NVIDA’s TrailNet framework for GPS-free navigation of paths. As a result, [taylor] hopes to end up with …read more

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Turn Command Lines into Web Appsjobson-custom-webapps-feturedwd5gnr1

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 03:01:43 +0000

Even if you like using a graphical user interface, you can probably agree that writing a graphical program is usually harder than writing an old-fashioned text-based program. Putting that GUI into an online format means even more to think about. [Adam Kewley] has the answer to that problem: Jobson. As you can see in the video below, the program is a web server that runs command line programs as jobs.

Simply write a YAML file to describe the program’s inputs and outputs and Jobson will create input fields for arguments and display the output in a web page. Any files …read more

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Hackaday Links: November 19, 2017Hackaday Linksbrianbenchoff

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:37 +0000

[Peter]’s homebuilt ultralight is actually flying now and not in ground effect, much to the chagrin of YouTube commenters. [Peter Sripol] built a Part 103 ultralight (no license required, any moron can jump in one and fly) in his basement out of foam board from Lowes. Now, he’s actually doing flight testing, and he managed to build a good plane. Someone gifted him a ballistic parachute so the GoFundMe for the parachute is unneeded right now, but this gift parachute is a bit too big for the airframe. Not a problem; he’ll just sell it and buy the smaller model. …read more

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Homemade Test Jig Is Cheaper Than Outsourcingjig_feattomnardi

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 21:01:59 +0000

In the past, [Sjaak] has had his testing and programming jigs made for him in Shenzhen, but realized they weren’t that great of a value. They weren’t terribly expensive in the grand scheme of things, but they didn’t include any wiring, so he was still spending his own time and money. His quest to develop his own in-house jigs not only netted him a considerable cost savings in the end, but also produced a nicely detailed post on his site for anyone else who may be heading down the same path. That’s a win-win in our book.

The idea behind …read more

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Tips For Basic Machining on a Drill Pressdrillpress_feattomnardi

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 18:01:20 +0000

It’s safe to say most Hackaday readers would love to have a mill at home, or a nice lathe, but such equipment isn’t always practical for the hobbyist. The expense and amount of room they take up is a hard sell unless you’re building things on them regularly, so we’re often forced to improvise. In his latest video, [Eric Strebel] gives some practical advice on using a standard drill press to perform tasks you would normally need a mill or lathe for; and while his tips probably won’t come as a surprise to the old-hands out there, they might just …read more

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Real-Life Electronic NeuronsNeuronsHeaderbrianbenchoff

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 15:01:56 +0000

All the kids down at Stanford are talking about neural nets. Whether this is due to the actual utility of neural nets or because all those kids were born after AI’s last death in the mid-80s is anyone’s guess, but there is one significant drawback to this tiny subset of machine intelligence: it’s a complete abstraction. Nothing called a ‘neural net’ is actually like a nervous system, there are no dendrites or axions and you can’t learn how to do logic by connecting neurons together.

NeruroBytes is not a strange platform for neural nets. It’s physical neurons, rendered in PCBs …read more

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