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Preview: Design - Emotion

Design & Emotion





Updated: 2016-01-18T09:17:14Z

 



The Emotional City – the future of the (smart) city from an affective point of view

2013-08-14T08:02:19Z

These days designers, technologists, hacktivists, urbanists, architects and journalists are all exploring how the urban environment is going to change in coming years, facing challenges and opportunities related to the upcoming megapolis, connected city and smart city.  In their experiments and discussions, you see an increase in attention for an affective approach and perspective. Here’s […]These days designers, technologists, hacktivists, urbanists, architects and journalists are all exploring how the urban environment is going to change in coming years, facing challenges and opportunities related to the upcoming megapolis, connected city and smart city.  In their experiments and discussions, you see an increase in attention for an affective approach and perspective. Here’s why. Technology as enabler of happiness and subjective wellbeing in cities Technology will be able to help us build solutions that will help simplify the increasingly complex environment and context in cities. However, will these technological advances be able to also increase happiness and subjective wellbeing? According to Mathieu Lefevre “technology has the potential to make the mega city more human or certainly to allow humans to connect more. One of the factors most closely associated with the experience of the megapolis in surveys is loneliness. Technology, while it does not replace human contact, can help connect city dwellers and certainly navigate the immensity of the megacity.” In this sense, technology serves as an enabler of connectivity and contact which may form the basis for meaningful connections between people, leading to positive emotional experiences. Technology can also have a more direct affective impact, which can be seen for example in the architectural installation Hylozoic Ground, a finalist for the Katerva Award insustainability. This jungle-like technology is a prototype for living building surfaces that combine cybernetics with smart chemistry. The immersive, evolving technology offers a responsive framework for a new kind of architectural experience that senses people and the environment and whose principles may be applied in other contexts, such as gardens. Hylozoic Ground could even offer its inhabitants positive emotional experiences similar to being close to nature. The city you love to hate: exploring affective approaches to the smart city This is the title of a very interesting paper by Michiel de Lange of The Mobile City. In it, he sketches a framework for what he calls the ‘affective smart city’. A short excerpt: Looking back to how the city has been understood as a hybrid form, we can identify three more or less successive conceptual foundations. In the first, which I call the ecosystem view, the early modern metropolis is theorized as a distinct socio-environmental combination that mediates people’s behavior and mentality. The second, which I call the phenomenological view, tries to bridge spatial and mental domains by focusing on people’s sensory and cognitive experiences of cities. The third, which I call the affective view, shifts attention to emotional relationships between people and hybrid techno-urban environments. Recently, the city is increasingly often conceptualized in affective terms. We see this view emerging in locative media art and its tight intellectual ties with actor-network theory, as it seeks to trace and map complex relationships between places, people, technologies in ‘emotional cartographies’ (Nold 2009). Ubicomp and urban informatics researchers are developing similar ideas about city possessing some form of ‘sentience’ (Shepard 2011). Affect is also central in recent explorations of how digital media can strengthen citizen engagement by fostering feelings of ‘ownership’ (de Lange & de Waal 2012). Contemporary experimental urban design interventions frequently target this affective realm, oftentimes by stirring emotions and desires though play and gamification, or through po[...]



Mini ‘Art Beat’ full of LED’s serves as mobile urban screen, adding (your) personality

2013-08-12T09:17:11Z

Not that the Mini was lacking it, but the 48000 LED’s that were incorporated in this campaign model give a whole new dimension to its already striking personality. Plus, it enables you to give it your own personality! Awesome, and inspiring to look beyond the typical car surface and the typical ways of using urban […]

Not that the Mini was lacking it, but the 48000 LED’s that were incorporated in this campaign model give a whole new dimension to its already striking personality. Plus, it enables you to give it your own personality! Awesome, and inspiring to look beyond the typical car surface and the typical ways of using urban screens and façades.

Have a look at the effect in the video’s below:

 

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width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/-8vyCpjmjuw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>




Coca Cola launches ‘Happy Places’ photo app

2012-11-07T14:47:00Z

Coca-Cola launches a photo app and social network called Happy Places, with the angle that photo sharing is more about sharing happy moments. The emphasis is therefore on the emotional content and context of the photo. I think it is an interesting concept, but it may lack richness with the mere emphasis on ‘happiness’. Via […]Coca-Cola launches a photo app and social network called Happy Places, with the angle that photo sharing is more about sharing happy moments. The emphasis is therefore on the emotional content and context of the photo. I think it is an interesting concept, but it may lack richness with the mere emphasis on ‘happiness’. Via Brandchannel: Coca-Cola has long made happiness part of its brand DNA. Now extending that joy into social, the iconic brand‘s Happy Places photo app and social network is encouraging people to share their happy moments with a new photo-sharing social network, Happy Places, and a free mobile app to enable it. The launch comes as Twitter is rumored to be ready to launch a photo filter, a move that Instagram’s CEO says doesn’t scare him. While the website’s domain name was registered in June it’s not yet activated, although its free iOS app was released November 1st, described as: “that place where you can upload photos of your happy moments, share them, and remember them any time you want. Take a picture or pick one from your albums, add it to your profile, and share that moment of happiness with your followers in Happy Places, or your friends in Facebook or Twitter.” Users can view and comment on other’s pictures and follow hashtags like #music, #joy and #girlfriends to keep up-to-date with new uploads that fit with these “moments.” A earlier version of the app was released for Android and BlackBerry devices. While it likely won’t make inroads into the Instagram, Flickr and Facebook photo app space, AppSide notes that “Coke’s mighty marketing muscle and impressive global reach means that it has the ability to reach out to whole new audiences that most photo-sharing services could never even dream of.” [...]



Socially Responsive Design – an interview for Connecting the Dots

2012-11-02T11:49:50Z

For the London Design Week special issue of Connecting the Dots (September 2012), I was interviewed on the topic of Socially Responsive Design: INTRO: What happens when designers shift their focus from satisfying consumer desires, to facilitating new social possibilities? In recent design history, different labels have popped up to describe design research practices that […]For the London Design Week special issue of Connecting the Dots (September 2012), I was interviewed on the topic of Socially Responsive Design: INTRO: What happens when designers shift their focus from satisfying consumer desires, to facilitating new social possibilities? In recent design history, different labels have popped up to describe design research practices that engage with social issues. These include participatory design, service design, transformative design, metadesign and social design. This article explores the notion of socially responsive design, a term coined by design researchers Adam Thorpe and Lorraine Gamman based in the Design Against Crime Research Centre, London, UK. It describes design that makes a social impact, is driven by social issues and delivers social change. Design researchers Hannah Jones and Anette Lundebye attempt to ‘connect the dots’ between a range of socially responsive design approaches taking place in the UK, Netherlands and Norway. They set out to interview six design experts from their network to discover how they define socially responsive design, what it feels like to be involved in this practice; and how it’s likely to impact on design in the future. I was interviewed by Hannah and Anette, an excerpt of my answers that made it to the final article: CD: What is Socially Responsive Design? We kicked off our interviews by asking our different design researchers, educators and practitioners if they consider themselves as socially responsive designers and how they understand this term. MvH: I see an increasing interest in socially responsive design within the context of experience-driven design. In fact, I believe they are interdependent and they share the concept of emotion. Emotions are the drivers behind (social) behaviour as well as behind the experiences we the dots #545socially responsive designhave in general. Something that is becoming more important in experience design is the impact of products on people’s general health, well-being and happiness. In the past decade or so, the Internet and developments in mobile technology have completely changed our perspectives of the world and our social environment. Take the recent events in the Middle East for example. It made us feel closer to the people actually fighting for change far, far away and made us feel a shared responsibility. CD: Can you give us a practical example of socially responsive design?Each of our experts were asked to come up with examples of socially responsive design from their own practice or inspiring examples from the work of others. MvH: An example that immediately comes to my mind is a prototype concept for an app that we created some years ago called ‘Snapje’. This app engages both parents and children with autism. The Snapje concept has been developed to enable children to get skills in emotion recognition in relation to the context. A parent can take photos of situations that have an emotional meaning. Photos can be taken of familiar people, but also from the child itself. On the one hand it is very useful to learn from emotions of others in relation to the context. On the other hand, it is useful to learn the relation between the context and an emotion through own experiences of the emotion. (www.emotiondiary.com/snapje/) CD: What does it feel like to participate in socially responsive design? We wanted to understand from our interviewees how being involved in socially responsive design is different to traditional design in terms of the emotional feedback from the process. MvH: Engaging people, makin[...]



Introducing D&E2012 conference keynote speaker: Bernardo Fleming (IFF)

2012-09-06T17:18:45Z

Bernardo Fleming is the head of the Olfactive Design Studio (ODS) at International Flavors and Fragrances (IFF) for the EAME region (Europe, Africa and Middle East). As a fairly young department for IFF, Bernardo was one of the pioneers responsible for the strategic vision of the department. Today he is responsible for evolving the function […]

(image) Bernardo Fleming is the head of the Olfactive Design Studio (ODS) at International Flavors and Fragrances (IFF) for the EAME region (Europe, Africa and Middle East). As a fairly young department for IFF, Bernardo was one of the pioneers responsible for the strategic vision of the department. Today he is responsible for evolving the function and bringing to life new fragrance solutions that capture emotion into functional products for the FMCG industry. He is based out of the Creative Centre in Hilversum in The Netherlands.

Originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Bernardo has been working over the last 12 years within the fragrance industry, developing a unique and fresh approach to fragrance design. He combines a strong strategic vision with innovative thinking, endless curiosity, a keen eye for market trends, and a high level of execution. For him, his work is integrated into everything he does. He loves to travel and considers himself an explorer always looking for new ideas, ways of thinking and inspiration.

Bernardo has worked across a wide spectrum of projects with varied priorities; from developing innovative fragrance delivery systems for the laundry category, to “time travelling” for the olfactive future in toilet care products, and most recently partnering with artists and designers to enrich sensorial experiences by adding the dimension of scent.

Yesterday I caught up with Bernardo at the beautiful office of IFF in Hilversum, The Netherlands. He showed me around, I had a sniff at the wonderful D&E2012 fragrance he developed especially for the conference with this team, and he showed the vast library of IFF developed products. An intense experience for the senses. I also took the opportunity to ask Bernardo how he interprets ‘design for emotion’, what it means in his field of work and how he goes ‘out of control’.

To me ‘design for emotion’ stands for…

src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/_0VivmBT6yc" frameborder="0" width="560" height="315">

“Out of Control”

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IFF

IFF is a leading global creator of flavours and fragrances used in a wide variety of consumer products. Millions of consumers around the world enjoy these products on a daily basis without ever knowing that they are a key component to the unique scent and taste experiences people love. For more information about the company, visit the website at www.iff.com




New book ‘Design for Emotion’ by Van Gorp & Adams, now available

2012-07-11T14:37:28Z

Ever since I met Trevor van Gorp at the 6th International Conference on Design & Emotion in Gothenburg, Sweden, I knew he was passionate about this topic. Now he co-authored (alongside Edie Adams of Microsoft) a brand new book “Design for Emotion” to share his passion with the world. The book provides a very nice […]Ever since I met Trevor van Gorp at the 6th International Conference on Design & Emotion in Gothenburg, Sweden, I knew he was passionate about this topic. Now he co-authored (alongside Edie Adams of Microsoft) a brand new book “Design for Emotion” to share his passion with the world. The book provides a very nice overview of the theory, psychology and concepts behind ‘design for emotion’. I highly recommend it, especially for professionals that haven’t studied this topic too much yet. The book offers a rich amount of background information and examples that will help you to better understand the concept of emotional design. Furthermore Van Gorp & Adams illustrate their framework A.C.T. to put ’emotional design’ into practice. I am also very happy to have contributed to the book with an interview on the LEMtool. Official announcement by Trevor on his website Affective Design: After seven years of research and almost one and a half years of writing, I’m very pleased to announce that the book I’ve co-authored with Microsoft’s Edie Adams on designing for emotion and personality is available on Amazon. Drawing on our combined experience of over 30 years in graphic, interactive and industrial design, human factors, and product management, Design for Emotion explores the what, when, where, why and how of designing emotion and personality. We define and model emotion and personality in a way that relates directly to design practice. To help illustrate how emotion and personality can be applied across different design disciplines, marketing and communications, we’ve also included practical case studies and interviews with some of the brightest minds utilizing emotion in design, including: Interviews Stephen P. Anderson – author of Seductive Interaction Design Aarron Walter – head of UX for Mailchimp, author of Designing for Emotion Patrick Jordan – author of Designing Pleasurable Products Marco van Hout – co-founder and creative director, SusaGroup, developers of the LEMtool Trish Miner – co-creator of the Microsoft Desirability Toolkit Case Studies Microsoft Windows Phone 7 Reference Designs – by Moni Wolf PICO™  (Negative Pressure Wound Therapy) - by Matt Pattison, Shayal Chhibber, Damian Smith and Chris Fryer For more information about the book, head on over to the new Design for Emotion site, or buy the book on Amazon.com [...]



Measure web emotions with LEMtool

2012-05-23T19:51:00Z

The Internet has evolved from a source of information to a rich media and social experience. Websites no longer just intent to prevent negative emotions (usability), but intent to delight and engage a user. LEMtool is a web based self-report tool (developed by SusaGroup, researched at University of Twente) to run quick studies to uncover […]The Internet has evolved from a source of information to a rich media and social experience. Websites no longer just intent to prevent negative emotions (usability), but intent to delight and engage a user. LEMtool is a web based self-report tool (developed by SusaGroup, researched at University of Twente) to run quick studies to uncover the emotional impact of your website, prototype or visual concept. Now you can start designing for emotion. LEMtool makes it possible to uncover the emotional impact of a design. You can test sketches, mock-ups, early designs, websites or any other image. In other words: testing at any stage in the design process is possible. With LEMtool it is even possible to evaluate live websites or working prototypes on a password protected location. Also, have a look at the LEMtool features. Below, I will describe more extensively what science is behind the development of LEMtool. The science behind LEMtool Optimizing usability is the basis for every great user experience. Apart from the actual usability of a website, there is also the usability as perceived by the user. Several studies indicate a strong relation between perceived usability and the visual appeal of a website (“attractive things appear to work better”). This seems to suggest that the main purpose of visual design in any interface, is a functional one, aimed at improving usability. Emotion is therefore a vital additional dimension to current usability studies. Indeed, efficient and effective communication with the user through the appropriate visual design of an interface, is a goal most designers seek to accomplish. Nonetheless, visual appeal is not purely perceived as functional. Research has indicated that there are attributes in an interface that do not necessarily relate to usability, but to the pleasure that a high visual appeal interface might evoke in its users. What links visual appeal to affect (and emotion) is that objects are not only categorized based on perceived features of the object, but can also be emotionally categorized. This means that objects that evoke similar emotions can be categorized based on the similarity of these emotions. Emotion is therefore a vital additional dimension to current usability studies. Web relevant emotions Identifying specific emotions that are most relevant in web- and media experiences helped build a more relevant basis for the LEMtool. In an experiment using free-response tasks for commenting on website, participants consistently reported most on three areas, namely; aesthetics (visual stimuli pleasuring or offending the senses), usability (perception of effectiveness and efficiency of an interface based on goals and expectations), and liking (an overall judgment of the user’s interactive experiences). Especially the areas of aesthetics and usability are central to the evaluation of interfaces in general. In the table on the right, you see the final eight emotions and to which area they relate. Why work with a cartoon character? The LEMtool has been developed to depict emotions in the clearest, most recognizable way. In order to achieve this, LEM – a cartoon character, has been developed that shows eight caricatured expressions of emotions3. Facial caricaturing (reduction of facial information redundant to the expression and exaggeration of the essential components) has been found to enhance the recognizability of emotions. Why not add the words to explain the expression? We deliberately do not explain which emotions are expressed by the character. This â[...]



Wanted: A common understanding of (the term) User Experience

2012-05-22T12:52:08Z

I just came back from UXSpain, the first edition of what hopefully will soon be a household conference for the Spanish UX community. At the conference there were professionals from many different backgrounds, all brought together by the commonly shared term User Experience (UX) which problably all attendents use in their profile. However, in the […]

I just came back from UXSpain, the first edition of what hopefully will soon be a household conference for the Spanish UX community. At the conference there were professionals from many different backgrounds, all brought together by the commonly shared term User Experience (UX) which problably all attendents use in their profile. However, in the various presentations and especially in the round table discussions in which the audience participated very passionately, you could also notice strong differences in opinion and approach (swinging from design-focus, reseach-focus to organisation-focus). I think this was not only due to professional differences of opinion, but I also felt there was a lack of common understanding of the term User Experience.

I would like to point you to a wonderful piece called the “User Experience White Paper – bringing clarity to the concept of user experience“. This was written and put together by a group of 30 experts, as a result of the  Dagstuhl Seminar on Demarcating User Experience, September 15-18, 2010.

Most importantly not a definite document, but according to the experts and also in my opinion, an important step towards a common understanding on user experience. Have a look and tell me what you think.




A call for call bells in restaurants

2012-02-16T08:47:27Z

Last week in Madrid, I had some appetizers in a restaurant with the people of EmotionExplorerLab. I noticed the small device on the table, illustrated on the above photo. It says ‘Pulsa y Voy’ (Spanish for ‘Click and I Go’), and it gives you the option to call on the waiter. And, even better, be […]Last week in Madrid, I had some appetizers in a restaurant with the people of EmotionExplorerLab. I noticed the small device on the table, illustrated on the above photo. It says ‘Pulsa y Voy’ (Spanish for ‘Click and I Go’), and it gives you the option to call on the waiter. And, even better, be specific about your wish, such as for example to call for the check. After the appetizes, one click was enough to have the waitress look on her special watch and come with the check. Timing: 30 seconds. My instant reaction was: wow, this would take me at least 10 minutes in some places in the Netherlands (where the restaurant service in terms of speed and attendance is quite poor overall). It wasn’t my first encounter with this type of devices, as in Korea this is actually a very common restaurant feature. Why Koreans use the call bell? This was nicely explained on a site I found: Why do Korean Restaurants us a call bell? As for the culture of Korean restaurant eating, there is no appetizer, entree, dessert type of menu. You order your meal, and you are given your food + banchan which is the Korean word for side dishes. The banchan is included with your meal. Perhaps you can think of it as small appetizers that come out at the same time as your meal. After you are done eating your food, you are usually given your check with some fruit pieces or even a cup of shik-hae which is a sweet rice drink. That would essentially be your dessert. So most Koreans just eat and leave. We don’t chit chat and linger over dessert wine and creme brulee like Westerners, at least not the older generation. The bell system is put in place so as soon as the meal is over, the customer can press the button to get their check and leave. It’s also a great tool to help restaurants provide quick service to customers without invading their privacy. Haven’t you been in the situation where your waiter comes to check on you and you have a big mouthful of food in your mouth? Wrong timing, right? It’s just an easier way to run business to call your waiter when needed. Wouldn’t a call bell in all restaurants be a welcome relief for all parties? So, despite Spanish eating culture being completely the opposite from the Korean (Spanish take up to 2 hours for lunch ;-)), the call bell also seems to work well within that context. So, I wonder, would such a simple concept work in most cultures? And, if so, why don’t we see them much more often? Similar concepts have proven to be successful within all types of settings (air planes for example, see image) and there are obviously many on the market. So, why isn’t it a common feature, and what is blocking it from becoming a real success in the restaurant business? It would seem to help them work more efficient and creat less irritation among both waiters and clients, wouldn’t it? [...]



Snapshot: unhappy bread

2012-02-14T15:04:20Z

This unhappy bread knew it was going to be bitten in Hotel de Las Letras in Madrid. And it was…

This unhappy bread knew it was going to be bitten in Hotel de Las Letras in Madrid. And it was…

(image)