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Preview: Journal of Semitic Studies - current issue

Journal of Semitic Studies Current Issue





Published: Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:54:40 GMT

 



JoAnn Scurlock, Sourcebook for Ancient Mesopotamian Medicine

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

ScurlockJoAnn, Sourcebook for Ancient Mesopotamian Medicine (Writings from the Ancient World). Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta2014. Pp. xix + 764. Price: $84.95 paperback. ISBN: 978-1-58983-969-4.



Saqer Salah, Die Mittelassyrischen Personen- und Rationenlisten aus Tall Šêh Ḥamad/Dūr-Katlimmu

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

SalahSaqer, Die Mittelassyrischen Personen- und Rationenlisten aus Tall Šêh Ḥamad/Dūr-Katlimmu (Berichte der Ausgrabung Tall Šëḫ Ḥamad/Dür-Katlimmu 18). Harrassowitz Verlag, Wiesbaden2014. Pp. lxxiv + 460. Price: €118.00 hardback. ISBN: 978-3-447-10243-8.



Hélène Dallaire, The Syntax of Volitives in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite Prose

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

DallaireHélène, The Syntax of Volitives in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaan- ite Prose (Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic 9). Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake, IN2014. Pp. xii + 250. Price: $49.50 hardback. ISBN: 978-1-57506307-2.



Peter Bekins, Transitivity and Object Marking in Biblical Hebrew

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

BekinsPeter, Transitivity and Object Marking in Biblical Hebrew (Harvard Semitic Studies 64). Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake, IN2014. Pp. xx + 234. Price: $44.50 hardback. ISBN: 978-1-57506-948-7.



Kenneth H. Cuffey, The Literary Coherence of the Book of Micah: Remnant, Restoration, and Promise

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

CuffeyKenneth H., The Literary Coherence of the Book of Micah: Remnant, Restoration, and Promise (Library of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies 611). Bloomsbury T&T Clark, London2015. Pp. xix + 379. Price $120.00 hardback. ISBN: 978-0-567-00164-1.



Simon Chi-Chung Cheung, Wisdom Intoned: A Reappraisal of the Genre ‘Wisdom Psalms’

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

CheungSimon Chi-Chung, Wisdom Intoned: A Reappraisal of the Genre ‘Wisdom Psalms’ (The Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies 613). Bloomsbury T&T Clark, London2015. Pp. xvi + 229. Price: £65.00 hardback. ISBN: 9780-567-66152-4.



A.M. Butts (ed.), Semitic Languages in Contact

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

ButtsA.M. (ed.), Semitic Languages in Contact (Studies in Semitic Languages and Linguistics 82). Brill, Leiden2015. Pp. 420. Price: €150.00/US$194.00 hardback. ISBN: 978-90-0430014-9.



Miriam J. Bier, ‘Perhaps there is Hope’: Reading Lamentations as a Polyphony of Pain, Penitence, and Protest

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

BierMiriam J., ‘Perhaps there is Hope’: Reading Lamentations as a Polyphony of Pain, Penitence, and Protest (The Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies 603). Bloomsbury, London2015. Pp. xv + 249. Price: £70.00 hardback. ISBN: 9780-56765-838-8.



Athalya Brenner-Idan and Helen Efthimiadis-Keith (eds) A Feminist Companion to Tobit and Judith

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Brenner-IdanAthalya and Efthimiadis-KeithHelen (eds) A Feminist Companion to Tobit and Judith (Feminist Companion to the Bible: Second Series). Bloomsbury, London2015. Pp. xix + 277. Price. $29.95 paperback. ISBN: 9780-567-65601-8.



R. Timothy McLay (ed.), The Temple in Text and Tradition: A Festschrift in Honour of Robert Hayward

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

McLayR. Timothy (ed.), The Temple in Text and Tradition: A Festschrift in Honour of Robert Hayward (Library of Second Temple Studies 83). Bloomsbury, London2014. Pp. xxiii + 316. Price: £74.99 hardback. ISBN: 978-0-567-06269-7.



Ángel Sáenz-Badillos Pérez, Lengua y literature de los judíos de al-Andalus (siglos X—XII)

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

PérezÁngel Sáenz-Badillos, Lengua y literature de los judíos de al-Andalus (siglos X—XII), Edición de José Martínez Delgado. Editorial Universidad de Granada, Granada2015. Pp. 390. Price: € 22.00 paperback. ISBN: 978-84-338-5731-6.



Subhi Ali Adawi (translator), The Qur'an in Another Language, Translated to Hebrew

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Ali AdawiSubhi (translator), The Qur'an in Another Language, Translated to Hebrew. The Bayinat Center for Quranic Studies, The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Amman, 2015. Pp. 528. Price: $69.95 hardback.



Giancarlo Toloni (ed.), L'opera di Francesco Vattioni

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

ToloniGiancarlo (ed.), L'opera di Francesco Vattioni. Paideia Editrice, Brescia2016. Pp. 138. ISBN: 978-88-394-0895-2.



Michael D. Coogan with Cynthia R. Chapman, A Brief Introduction to the Old Testament: The Hebrew Bible in Its Context

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

CooganMichael D. with ChapmanCynthia R., A Brief Introduction to the Old Testament: The Hebrew Bible in Its Context (Third Edition). Oxford University Press, New York2016. Pp. xxii + 468. Price: £41.99 paperback. ISBN: 978-019-023859-9.



Cynthia Edenburg, Dismembering the Whole. Composition and Purpose of Judges 19–21

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

EdenburgCynthia, Dismembering the Whole. Composition and Purpose of Judges 19–21 (AIL 24). SBL Press, Atlanta2016. Pp. xiv + 424. Price: $51.95 paperback. ISBN: 978-1-62837-124-6.



April D. Westbrook, ‘And He Will Take Your Daughters…’: Woman Story and the Ethical Evaluation of Monarchy in the David Narrative

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

WestbrookApril D., ‘And He Will Take Your Daughters…’: Woman Story and the Ethical Evaluation of Monarchy in the David Narrative (The Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies 610). Bloomsbury, London2015. Pp xii + 269. ISBN: 978-0-56765-852-4.



Michael Knibb, The Ethiopie Text of the Book of Ezekiel: A Critical Edition

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

KnibbMichael, The Ethiopie Text of the Book of Ezekiel: A Critical Edition. Oxford University Press. Pp. 231. Price: £120.00 hardback. ISBN: 978-0-19-826184-1.



Christopher R. Seitz, Joel

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

SeitzChristopher R., Joel (The International Theological Commentary). Bloomsbury T&T Clark, London2016. Pp. Xii + 239. Price: £55.00. ISBN: 978-0-56757073-4.



Mark Sneed (ed.), Was There a Wisdom Tradition? New Prospects in Israelite Wisdom Studies

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

SneedMark (ed.), Was There a Wisdom Tradition? New Prospects in Israelite Wisdom Studies (Ancient Israel and its Literature 23). Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta2015. Pp. xi + 325. Price: $40.95 paperback. ISBN: 978-1-62837-099-7.



Muḥammad B. ‘Abd Al-Raḥmān Rāšid Al-ṯanyān, Nuqüš al-qarn al-hijrï al-’awwal (al-qarn al-säbi‘ al-mïlâdï) al-mu’arraḫa fī al-mamlaka al-‘arabiyya al-sa‘üdiyya: diräsa taḥlïla jadïda

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

‘Abd Al-Raḥmān Rāšid Al-ṯanyānMuḥammad B., Nuqüš al-qarn al-hijrï al-’awwal (al-qarn al-säbi‘ al-mïlâdï) al-mu’arraḫa fī al-mamlaka al-‘arabiyya al-sa‘üdiyya: diräsa taḥlïla jadïda. King Saud University, Riyadh2015. Pp. 178. Paperback. ISBN: 987-603-90356-5-7.



A Bird's-Eye View of Personal Pronouns and Accusative Markers in Ancient Semitic Languages

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
In this comparative study of ancient Semitic languages, I present data on the development of personal pronouns and accusative markers. My meta-analysis combines what is known about the major representative languages from both East and West Semitic languages in order to focus on three gradual, corresponding developments: (1) the erosion of inflected oblique independent personal pronouns; (2) the disappearance of the case-ending system; and (3) the emergence of the independent object marker. A bird's-eye view of the documented evidence on Semitic languages suggests that in West Semitic languages, both the oblique independent personal pronoun and the case-ending system gradually disappeared. In parallel, a set of object markers was introduced into West Semitic. This process will be shown to progress at a different pace for the various languages in this branch, and to be relevant not only to the North-west Semitic branch, but rather to the span of old West Semitic languages.



The Syntax of Cardinal Numerals in Judges, Amos, Esther and 1QM*

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
The studies currently available on the syntax of cardinal numerals are either too narrow, too brief, or significantly dated. In this study, I establish a new methodology for considering cardinal numerals and provide a preliminary description of numeral syntax based on evidence in the Books of Judges, Amos, Esther and 1QM. I also explore the potential for identifying diachronic change in Ancient Hebrew on the basis of numeral syntax.



The Mawwāl about the Snare and the Sparrow: A Late Medieval Colloquial Egyptian Verse Adaptation of Narrative(s) in Prose Rooted in Arabic Classical Literature

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
The paper presents a study and critical edition of an Egyptian mawwāl about a hunter, a snare and a sparrow, contained in the seventeenth- century ce BNF, ms. arabe, 3571. It is a verse piece composed in colloquial Egyptian Arabic, whose narrative was known in a number of popular versions in prose mostly in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries ce. This narrative has deep roots in classical Arabic literature.



Some Linguistic and Stylistic Observations on a Yemeni Late Judaeo-Arabic Text – Ḥabšūš's Nineteenth-Century Ru’yā al-Yaman1

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
In 1870, a Ṣan‘ānī coppersmith by the name Ḥabšūš acted as the guide for the French orientalist Joseph Halévy during his expedition in the Jawf, the north-eastern Zaydī tribal area of the Yemen, Najrān and Mārib in order to collect and copy pre-Islamic inscriptions. In 1893, Ḥabšūš was persuaded by the Austrian scholar Eduard Glaser, whose guide he had also been, to put into writing an account of his journeyings with Halévy 23 years before. Ḥabšūš began his narrative in Hebrew, but was later prevaled upon by Glaser to finish the text in Arabic. The result is this fascinating Literary Mixed Arabic text which, although translated into Hebrew, Italian and French, has been as yet the subject of no in-depth linguistic study. Such a study is now under way which includes also by way of comparison a contemporary Muslim text written in Literary Mixed Arabic. This article highlights in thirteen passages some of the interesting linguistic and stylistic features of Ḥabšūš's text which will eventually form part of the ongoing study referred to above.



Amorite: A Northwest Semitic Language?

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
The present paper discusses the problem of the classification of Amorite within the Semitic family. After testing the Amorite corpus of personal names and toponyms for the presence of sixty features that have been proposed as characteristic of the Central, Northwest and East Semitic branches — and viewed as necessary conditions for establishing the relation of a language to one of these sub-groups — the authors conclude that the existing data fail to be conclusive. Since, on the one hand, the available data can link Amorite to the Central, Northwest and East Semitic branches and, on the other hand, as various pieces of evidence are either missing or their interpretation is uncertain, the definite answer to the question of the genetic filiation of Amorite seems to remain beyond the reach of Semitic linguistics. This, in turn, implies that several theories concerning the place of Amorite among Semitic languages should be treated with more caution.



The Language of Musta’rab Jews: The Names of the Holidays in Peqtʿin as a Test Case

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
This article treats the Arabic-Hebrew interlingual contact that emerges from examination of the language of the Musta‘rab community in Israel. Based on a linguistic field study carried out among the Jews of Peqi‘in, it examines a unique phenomenon in their spoken dialect: the penetration of Arabic and Islamic terms into the Jewish religious sphere as exemplified in their designations for the Jewish holidays.This study shows that the Jews of Peqi‘in preferred the Arabic names of the holidays to the Hebrew ones; some of these names are ancient and are attested in medieval Jewish texts; others are late. It also shows that some of their Judaeo-Arabic expressions are identical to those used by their non-Jewish neighbours. Moreover, Peqi‘in Jews do not hesitate to use the designations for the non-Jewish holidays. Their adherence to Arabic is also exemplified by the use of unique Arabic words and expressions, not found in the surrounding dialects, which carry specifically Jewish meanings. Another intriguing finding was that the Jewish dialect of Peqi‘in has preserved unique Arabic configurations not found in the general spoken Arabic dialect. The roots of this phenomenon's anomalous nature, as compared to what is known of other Jewish communities, probably lie in the preservation in the vernacular of Peqi‘in Jews of an ancient path in use in medieval Judaeo-Arabic in the Fertile Crescent.



The Evolution of the rajaz Meter in Modern Arabic Poetry, As Reflected in the Works of Amal Dunqul

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
There is a close relationship between prosodic poetry and folk literature, if not one of harmony then at least one of tension.1 In the present study, this claim may be read between the lines, in the sense that prosodic poetry has not been granted a great deal of ‘legitimacy’ since it has been perceived as having distanced itself from the concepts of traditional poetry. A tension thus exists between the prosaic, the poetic and the folk aspects of the text, which the poet attempts to put into equilibrium. In this study we shall see that metrical feet used by the poet serve the content and also the creation of the images that he imagines and presents to the reader. This can be seen quite clearly in the novel feet he uses as well as in the changes that he adds to the original feet of the rajaz meter. The foot thus becomes a stylistic device that serves the image or the topic with which the poem deals. This relationship is reflected in both the style, namely the meter, and the content, which is the image painted by the poet.



The Dialectic of ‘Staying and Emigration’ in Emily Nasrallah's Novel Flight Against Time

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Research on the dialectic of ‘staying and emigration’ in the shadow of the Lebanese civil war (1975–90) suggests an overt correlation between the ongoing debate and the truth about that war, with such a dialectic being an outcome of the ravages of that cruel war. By unveiling the internal conflict, the present study seeks to examine that correlation and how it was portrayed in the literary works of the period. War is a key driver for emigration, and perhaps its impact is much greater than the repercussions of other possible factors, such as economic and social motives. In the dialectic of staying and emigration, the latter motives are only marginal compared with the impact of the war. The present study designs a tripartite model for emigration in time of war: the psychological phase, the implementation phase and the return phase, with an emphasis on the third stage which, at the end of the day, resolves the dispute between the conflicting parties. The study manifests the perception of an ironic return of the character during the war, which, in turn, furthers the writer's position on this dialectic. Radwan, the central character in Emily Nasrallah's Flight against Time, establishes the idea of the pressing need to return to the homeland, particularly in times of ordeal, when most people seek to emigrate in search of safety and security. It is a return that chooses the homeland, with a solid position that refuses emigration. As such, the return to the homeland in times of distress becomes an indispensable national requirement. Despite the radical changes the war brings about, the return becomes a moral victory in the face of war — a victory that enhances the characters? determination to defy war.



Counting in Ugaritic: A New Analysis of kbd*

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
The use of the notation kbd with numerals in Ugaritic economic texts, where it is typically translated ‘total’ or ‘plus’, appears to be unique among the counting systems of the Semitic languages. Most scholars trace these meanings to the common Semitic root kbd ‘to be heavy’, though other derivations have also been suggested. In this article, I propose a new analysis of kbd based on the Semitic root bdd ‘to be separate, isolated’. This root is attested in nominal forms in multiple Semitic languages; and in some, including Ugaritic, it can be combined with prepositions to convey an adverbial sense. Ultimately, the proper analysis of the term kbd in Ugaritic economic texts has significant implications for understanding the wider semantic range of the Semitic roots kbd and bdd.



The Phoenician Name of Cyprus: New Evidence from Early Hellenistic Times

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
The Phoenician name of Cyprus was not known with certainty until now. From the beginning of the Iron Age to the Hellenistic period the island was divided into independent kingdoms, each kingdom named after its capital. For this reason, only the names of towns or regions appeared in local inscriptions of that period – not the name of the entire island, whose name in Phoenician was therefore unknown. In this paper, we intend to review the entire evidence relating to the question (from both the second and the first millennia BCE, both internal and external sources) and present a new document, definitively solving the problem.



Indefinite Numerical Construct Phrases in Biblical Hebrew1

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
In both Biblical and Modern Hebrew, many of the cardinal numbers have different forms for the absolute and construct states (e.g. vs. ).The construct form is used in complex numbers, as in ‘three thousand’, and as syntactic heads in definite construct phrases, as in . This paper focuses on a third usage of the numerical construct which is not found at all in Modern Hebrew and is unusual in Biblical Hebrew: as syntactic head of indefinite construct phrases, e.g., ‘three days’. Construct phrases share phonological and syntactic traits with compounds, lexical units formed from a multi-word phrase by a diachronic lexicalization process. A compound has the syntactic status of a word, and typically has a semantically opaque, non-compositional meaning. In this study we show that, in addition to the complex numerals, indefinite numerical construct phrases can be grouped into three semantic categories: 1) measure expressions, 2) frequency/duration expressions, and 3) expressions with non-specific quantity reference. We argue that use of the construct state in these expressions emphasizes a semantic and syntactic resemblance to the compound. Just as the compound designates a unitary concept, measure, frequency and duration expressions designate abstract quantities measured in terms of units. The third category resembles the measure expression in that the counted entities are not significant in and of themselves, but only as part of an overall quantity. The systematic use of constructs in numerical phrases suggests that these phrases have undergone a degree of lexicalization.