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The British Journal of Social Work Advance Access





Published: Mon, 12 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2018 08:52:41 GMT

 



Integrating Attachment Theory into Probation Practice: A Qualitative Study

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
This research examined how a sample of English probation officers (POs) applied attachment theory as they supervised service users. Using an action research methodology over six months, the research identified aspects that were readily utilised (the idea that POs can sometimes represent a secure base figure and that attachment histories were significant). However, others offered little utility (the concept of mentalisation as a facility rooted in early attachment and the classification of attachment style). The reasons for this are explored and the process by which specialist research knowledge is applied by non-specialist practitioners is considered.



Becoming a Social Worker: Realising a Shared Approach to Professional Learning?

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Social work education has again been subject to scrutiny and review across the UK. Different countries have set about this task in different ways. In England, we can observe a top-down process driven by government; in Scotland, the approach has evolved more collaboratively. This paper discusses the recent Review of Social Work Education in Scotland within the broader pressures and opportunities of public service reform. At the heart of the review findings is a simple but timely conclusion: we need to realise a shared approach to professional learning, across the social work career path. This means moving beyond recent preoccupations with social work education, and polarising approaches to reform, towards a genuinely co-owned approach in which professional learning is a shared responsibility and a central feature of what it is to be a social work professional. In closing, the paper considers how we might realise a shared approach to professional learning in Scotland and beyond.