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MAP - Drugnews - Somalia



Media Awareness Project Drug News



Published: Sat, 16 Dec 2017 12:51:14 -0800

Last Build Date: Sat, 16 Dec 2017 18:10:01 GMT

 



Somalia: 'Paradise Flower' Chewers Savor Low-Price Bliss After

Thu, 28 Aug 2014 07:00:00 GMT

Sun-Sentinel, 28 Aug 2014 - MOGADISHU, Somalia - "The president has arrived, the president has arrived," chant youths in Mogadishu's Beerta Khaatka market, as armed men in trucks mounted with machine guns escort lorries with horns blaring through the throng. The joking salutation is not for Somalia's president, but hails a national institution nonetheless: white sacks brimming with leafy sprouts of khat, the narcotic shrub chewed across the Horn of Africa and Yemen in a tradition dating back centuries.



Somalia: How the UK's Ban on Khat Brought 'Bliss' To Somalia

Thu, 28 Aug 2014 07:00:00 GMT

Independent, 28 Aug 2014 - IN MOGADISHU - "The president has arrived, the president has arrived," chant youths in Mogadishu's Beerta Khaatka market, as armed men in trucks mounted with machine guns escort lorries with horns blaring through the throng. The joking salutation is not for Somalia's president, but hails white sacks brimming with leafy sprouts of khat, the narcotic shrub chewed across the Horn of Africa and Yemen in a tradition dating back centuries, which has recently been banned in the UK.



Somalia: OPED: The Khat Effect: The Last Battle Of Somalia's

Mon, 18 Dec 2006 08:00:00 GMT

Khaleej Times, 18 Dec 2006 - THE Mogadishu Islamists' decision to ban Khat, the narcotic stimulant that millions of Sumalis use, seemed to run on the lines of the old maxim, "A word of truth used with an ill intention". For long, Somalis have been using Khat as a pastime and for generating income to feed millions of children in a country where more than 43 per cent of the population lives on less than a dollar a day. Yes, Khat is a curse on the economy, health and family fabric of the Somali people. It props the economies of Somalia's neighbouring countries; with Kenya exporting $250 millions worth of Khat to Somalia annually and Ethiopia earning $60 million a year from Somaliland alone. Most of this money is the remittances sent by overseas Somalis to feed their loved ones back home. In addition to its financial burden, the Khat causes numerous health problems; causes family break ups, wastes people's time and energy and increases the ranks of the country's unemployed as addiction forces millions of productive countryside people to quit their farms and livestock to Khat markets, towns and villages.



Somalia: Web: Somali Islamists Ban Popular Drug

Fri, 17 Nov 2006 08:00:00 GMT

BBC News, 17 Nov 2006 - The Islamist group which controls much of southern Somalia has banned the popular stimulant khat, a day after protests in which one person died. Islamist leader Sheikh Sharif Sheikh Ahmed said khat was a bad influence. Many Somali men, especially gunmen, spend hours chewing it each day.



Somalia: Web: Somali Woman Is Flogged for Drugs

Thu, 24 Aug 2006 07:00:00 GMT

BBC News, 24 Aug 2006 - MOGADISHU, Somalia - Islamic leaders in Mogadishu on Thursday gave a woman 11 lashes for selling cannabis, the first female to receive such punishment since the fundamentalist rulers took over the capital in June. The woman, who throughout the beating insisted she was innocent, was flogged alongside five other men at the Yassin Square in Mogadishu in front of several hundred people. The small bundle of cannabis, worth around $1 on the streets of the capital, was burned before the crowd.



Somalia: Khat Trade Rules In Somalia

Sun, 16 Apr 2006 07:00:00 GMT

Washington Post, 16 Apr 2006 - Since Fall of Government, Warlords Finance Fiefdoms With Control of Narcotic Imports, Street Sales to 75 Percent of Adult Men WAJID, Somalia -- Before Somalia's government collapsed in 1991, Maryann Ali was an elementary school teacher who spent her days giving fifth-graders geography and math lessons. Now she earns a living dealing khat, a narcotic plant that when chewed yields a jittery high and feelings of invincibility that later melt into a lethargic stupor.



Somalia: Islamic Courts Demolish Stalls In Somalia

Tue, 23 Aug 2005 07:00:00 GMT

The Ledger, 23 Aug 2005 - MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Militias of Islamic courts on Tuesday began pulling down stalls suspected of selling wine, marijuana and other drugs in Somalia's capital, a militia leader and an Islamic court official said. Witnesses said the militiamen also confiscated equipment from two video halls during their effort to enforce sharia - or Islamic law.