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Occupational Medicine Advance Access





Published: Mon, 18 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Last Build Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2017 11:50:11 GMT

 



Developing a tool for identifying high-risk employers for inspection

2017-09-18

Abstract
Background
Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) data and other information are sometimes used to calculate an ‘Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) index’ as a way of identifying businesses considered ‘high risk’ to be inspected as part of enforcement work. However, no evidence on the validity of this index exists.
Aims
To evaluate the performance of the Alberta OHS index, a ‘score’ based largely on WCB claims data, and to see if an index calculated using different information could perform better.
Methods
Data from the Alberta Compliance Management Information System database, 2011–2015, and WCB claim database, 2007–2014, were retrieved. Issuing ‘stop work’ or ‘stop use’ orders in inspections was defined as a proxy of high-risk outcome. The performance of the current and a modified OHS index were assessed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and regression analyses.
Results
In large employers, neither the current nor the modified OHS index was particularly effective in identifying ‘high risk’ employers with the area under the ROC curve (AROC) of 0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.52–0.57; P < 0.001) and 0.59 (95% CI 0.57–0.62; P < 0.001), respectively. In small employers, neither index seemed very effective with an AROC of 0.54 (95% CI 0.53–0.56; P < 0.001) and 0.55 (95% CI 0.53–0.56; P < 0.001), respectively. These results were consistent in subgroup analyses of assignments without specific initiatives, both in large and small employers.
Conclusions
Neither the current nor a modified OHS index seemed to effectively identify high-risk employers. Heterogeneous results in large and small employers suggest that approaches to different-sized employers are appropriate.



Perceived effect of deployment on families of UK military personnel

2017-09-15

Abstract
Background
In the UK, little is known about the perceived effects of deployment, on military families, from military personnel in theatre.
Aims
To investigate military personnel’s perceptions of the impact of deployment on intimate relationships and children.
Methods
Deployed service personnel who were in a relationship, and who had children, completed a survey while deployed on combat operations. Data were taken from four mental health surveys carried out in Iraq in 2009 and Afghanistan in 2010, 2011 and 2014.
Results
Among 4265 participants, after adjusting for military and social-demographic covariates, perceiving that deployment had a negative impact on intimate relationships and children was associated with psychological distress, and traumatic stress symptoms. Military personnel who reported being in danger of being injured or killed during deployment, were more likely to report a perceived negative effect of deployment on their intimate relationships. Reservists were less likely to report a perceived negative impact of deployment on their children compared with regulars. Military personnel who themselves planned to separate from their partner were more likely to report psychological distress, and stressors at home. Perceived insufficient support from the Ministry of Defence was associated with poor mental health, and holding a junior rank.
Conclusions
Deployed UK military personnel with symptoms of psychological distress, who experienced stressors at home, were especially likely to perceive that their family were inadequately supported by the military. Those planning to separate from their partner were at increased risk of suffering with mental health problems while deployed.