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Cardiomyopathies [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

The nonischemic cardiomyopathies are a diverse group of cardiac disorders that frequently cause heart failure and death and are now recognized with increasing frequency. There has been substantial progress in the clinical recognition and understanding of the natural history of these conditions. Well-established and new techniques of cardiac imaging are also helpful in this regard. Basic scientists are elucidating the pathogenesis and pathobiology of individual cardiomyopathies. In this compendium, some of the most important advances in this field are reviewed. Scientific opportunities to enhance further collaborative research to accelerate progress are identified.



Classification, Epidemiology, and Global Burden of Cardiomyopathies [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

In the past 25 years, major advances were achieved in the nosography of cardiomyopathies, influencing the definition and taxonomy of this important chapter of cardiovascular disease. Nearly, 50% of patients dying suddenly in childhood or adolescence or undergoing cardiac transplantation are affected by cardiomyopathies. Novel cardiomyopathies have been discovered (arrhythmogenic, restrictive, and noncompacted) and added to update the World Health Organization classification. Myocarditis has also been named inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Extraordinary progress accomplished in molecular genetics of inherited cardiomyopathies allowed establishment of dilated cardiomyopathy as mostly cytoskeleton, force transmission disease; hypertrophic–restrictive cardiomyopathies as sarcomeric, force generation disease; and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy as desmosome, cell junction disease. Channelopathies (short and long QT, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia syndromes) should also be considered cardiomyopathies because of electric myocyte dysfunction. Cardiomyopathies are easily diagnosed but treated only with palliative pharmacological or invasive therapy. Curative therapy, thanks to insights into the molecular pathogenesis, has to target the fundamental mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of these conditions.



Dilated Cardiomyopathy [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

Nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) often has a genetic pathogenesis. Because of the large number of genes and alleles attributed to DCM, comprehensive genetic testing encompasses ever-increasing gene panels. Genetic diagnosis can help predict prognosis, especially with regard to arrhythmia risk for certain subtypes. Moreover, cascade genetic testing in family members can identify those who are at risk or with early stage disease, offering the opportunity for early intervention. This review will address diagnosis and management of DCM, including the role of genetic evaluation. We will also overview distinct genetic pathways linked to DCM and their pathogenetic mechanisms. Historically, cardiac morphology has been used to classify cardiomyopathy subtypes. Determining genetic variants is emerging as an additional adjunct to help further refine subtypes of DCM, especially where arrhythmia risk is increased, and ultimately contribute to clinical management.



Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disorder that is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy unexplained by secondary causes and a nondilated left ventricle with preserved or increased ejection fraction. It is commonly asymmetrical with the most severe hypertrophy involving the basal interventricular septum. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is present at rest in about one third of the patients and can be provoked in another third. The histological features of HCM include myocyte hypertrophy and disarray, as well as interstitial fibrosis. The hypertrophy is also frequently associated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. In the majority of patients, HCM has a relatively benign course. However, HCM is also an important cause of sudden cardiac death, particularly in adolescents and young adults. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, syncope, a family history of sudden cardiac death, and severe cardiac hypertrophy are major risk factors for sudden cardiac death. This complication can usually be averted by implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator in appropriate high-risk patients. Atrial fibrillation is also a common complication and is not well tolerated. Mutations in over a dozen genes encoding sarcomere-associated proteins cause HCM. MYH7 and MYBPC3, encoding β-myosin heavy chain and myosin-binding protein C, respectively, are the 2 most common genes involved, together accounting for ≈50% of the HCM families. In ≈40% of HCM patients, the causal genes remain to be identified. Mutations in genes responsible for storage diseases also cause a phenotype resembling HCM (genocopy or phenocopy). The routine applications of genetic testing and preclinical identification of family members represents an important advance. The genetic discoveries have enhanced understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of HCM and have stimulated efforts designed to identify new therapeutic agents.



Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disorder characterized by marked hypertrophy of the myocardium. It is frequently accompanied by dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and symptoms of dyspnea, angina, and syncope. The initial therapy for symptomatic patients with obstruction is medical therapy with β-blockers and calcium antagonists. However, there remain a subset of patients who have continued severe symptoms, which are unresponsive to medical therapy. These patients can be treated with septal reduction therapy, either surgical septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation. When performed by experienced operators working in high-volume centers, septal myectomy is highly effective with a >90% relief of obstruction and improvement in symptoms. The perioperative mortality rate for isolated septal myectomy in most centers is <1%. Alcohol septal ablation is a less invasive treatment. In many patients, the hemodynamic and clinical results are comparable to that of septal myectomy. However, the results of alcohol septal ablation are dependent on the septal perforator artery supplying the area of the contact between the hypertrophied septum and the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. There are some patients, particularly younger patients with severe hypertrophy, who do not uniformly experience complete relief of obstruction and symptoms. Both techniques of septal reduction therapy are highly operator dependent. The final decision as to which approach should be selected in any given patient is dependent up patient preference and the availability and experience of the operator and institution at which the patient is being treated.



Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy is an inherited heart muscle disorder, predisposing to sudden cardiac death, particularly in young patients and athletes. Pathological features include loss of myocytes and fibrofatty replacement of right ventricular myocardium; biventricular involvement is often observed. It is a cell-to-cell junction cardiomyopathy, typically caused by genetically determined abnormalities of cardiac desmosomes, which leads to detachment of myocytes and alteration of intracellular signal transduction. The diagnosis of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy does not rely on a single gold standard test but is achieved using a scoring system, which encompasses familial and genetic factors, ECG abnormalities, arrhythmias, and structural/functional ventricular alterations. The main goal of treatment is the prevention of sudden cardiac death. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the only proven lifesaving therapy; however, it is associated with significant morbidity because of device-related complications and inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator interventions. Selection of patients who are the best candidates for implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation is one of the most challenging issues in the clinical management.



Inflammatory Cardiomyopathic Syndromes [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

Inflammatory activation occurs in nearly all forms of myocardial injury. In contrast, inflammatory cardiomyopathies refer to a diverse group of disorders in which inflammation of the heart (or myocarditis) is the proximate cause of myocardial dysfunction, causing injury that can range from a fully recoverable syndrome to one that leads to chronic remodeling and dilated cardiomyopathy. The most common cause of inflammatory cardiomyopathies in developed countries is lymphocytic myocarditis most commonly caused by a viral pathogenesis. In Latin America, cardiomyopathy caused by Chagas disease is endemic. The true incidence of myocarditis is unknown to the limited utilization and the poor sensitivity of endomyocardial biopsies (especially for patchy diseases such as lymphocytic myocarditis and sarcoidosis) using the gold-standard Dallas criteria. Emerging immunohistochemistry criteria and molecular diagnostic techniques are being developed that will improve diagnostic yield, provide additional clues into the pathophysiology, and offer an application of precision medicine to these important syndromes. Immunosuppression is recommended for patients with cardiac sarcoidosis, giant cell myocarditis, and myocarditis associated with connective tissue disorders and may be beneficial in chronic viral myocarditis once virus is cleared. Further trials of immunosuppression, antiviral, and immunomodulating therapies are needed. Together, with new molecular-based diagnostics and therapies tailored to specific pathogeneses, the outcome of patients with these disorders may improve.



Restrictive Cardiomyopathy [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is characterized by nondilated left or right ventricle with diastolic dysfunction. The restrictive cardiomyopathies are a heterogenous group of myocardial diseases that vary according to pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and criteria, treatment, and prognosis. In this review, an overview of RCMs will be presented followed by a detailed discussion on 3 major causes of RCM, for which tailored interventions are available: cardiac amyloidosis, cardiac sarcoidosis, and cardiac hemochromatosis. Each of these 3 RCMs is challenging to diagnose, and recognition of each disease entity is frequently delayed. Clinical clues to promote recognition of cardiac amyloidosis, cardiac sarcoidosis, and cardiac hemochromatosis and imaging techniques used to facilitate diagnosis are discussed. Disease-specific therapies are reviewed. Early recognition remains a key barrier to improving survival in all RCMs.



Cardiomyopathies Due to Left Ventricular Noncompaction, Mitochondrial and Storage Diseases, and Inborn Errors of Metabolism [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

The normal function of the human myocardium requires the proper generation and utilization of energy and relies on a series of complex metabolic processes to achieve this normal function. When metabolic processes fail to work properly or effectively, heart muscle dysfunction can occur with or without accompanying functional abnormalities of other organ systems, particularly skeletal muscle. These metabolic derangements can result in structural, functional, and infiltrative deficiencies of the heart muscle. Mitochondrial and enzyme defects predominate as disease-related etiologies. In this review, left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy, which is often caused by mutations in sarcomere and cytoskeletal proteins and is also associated with metabolic abnormalities, is discussed. In addition, cardiomyopathies resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction, metabolic abnormalities, storage diseases, and inborn errors of metabolism are described.



Pediatric Cardiomyopathies [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

Pediatric cardiomyopathies are rare diseases with an annual incidence of 1.1 to 1.5 per 100 000. Dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies are the most common; restrictive, noncompaction, and mixed cardiomyopathies occur infrequently; and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is rare. Pediatric cardiomyopathies can result from coronary artery abnormalities, tachyarrhythmias, exposure to infection or toxins, or secondary to other underlying disorders. Increasingly, the importance of genetic mutations in the pathogenesis of isolated or syndromic pediatric cardiomyopathies is becoming apparent. Pediatric cardiomyopathies often occur in the absence of comorbidities, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, renal dysfunction, and diabetes mellitus; as a result, they offer insights into the primary pathogenesis of myocardial dysfunction. Large international registries have characterized the epidemiology, cause, and outcomes of pediatric cardiomyopathies. Although adult and pediatric cardiomyopathies have similar morphological and clinical manifestations, their outcomes differ significantly. Within 2 years of presentation, normalization of function occurs in 20% of children with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 40% die or undergo transplantation. Infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have a 2-year mortality of 30%, whereas death is rare in older children. Sudden death is rare. Molecular evidence indicates that gene expression differs between adult and pediatric cardiomyopathies, suggesting that treatment response may differ as well. Clinical trials to support evidence-based treatments and the development of disease-specific therapies for pediatric cardiomyopathies are in their infancy. This compendium summarizes current knowledge of the genetic and molecular origins, clinical course, and outcomes of the most common phenotypic presentations of pediatric cardiomyopathies and highlights key areas where additional research is required.Clinical Trial Registration:URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT02549664 and NCT01912534.



Modern Imaging Techniques in Cardiomyopathies [Cardiomyopathy Compendium]

2017-09-14T12:44:25-07:00

Modern advanced imaging techniques have allowed increasingly more rigorous assessment of the cardiac structure and function of several types of cardiomyopathies. In contemporary cardiology practice, echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are widely used to provide a basic framework in the evaluation and management of cardiomyopathies. Echocardiography is the quintessential imaging technique owing to its unique ability to provide real-time images of the beating heart with good temporal resolution, combined with its noninvasive nature, cost-effectiveness, availability, and portability. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provides data that are both complementary and uniquely distinct, thus allowing for insights into the disease process that until recently were not possible. The new catchphrase in the evaluation of cardiomyopathies is multimodality imaging, which is purported to be the efficient integration of various methods of cardiovascular imaging to improve the ability to diagnose, guide therapy, or predict outcomes. It usually involves an integrated approach to the use of echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of cardiomyopathies, and, on occasion, single-photon emission computed tomography and such specialized techniques as pyrophosphate scanning.